5

There were two reasons to prohibit -- the possibility of the wine being used for pagan practices, and to avoid intermarriage. The former would prohibit you from selling the wine too, the latter would only prohibit you from drinking it. The Gemara says if a non-Jewish baby touches the wine, that doesn't prohibit it from being sold, as that wasn't used for ...


3

The footnote you mentioned quotes the following opinions as ruling that bediavad one fulfills kiddush if one used stam yeinam: Responsa Kochav MiYaakov 198 Responsa Chesed LeAvraham vol II 31 Machazeh Avraham 49. In contrast, the following opinions are quoting as ruling that even bediavad one has not fulfilled his obligation: Responsa Levushei Mordechai ...


3

See J. David Bleich's article "May a Sabbath-Desecrator Drink Wine?" http://traditionarchive.org/news/article.cfm?id=105659


3

The quick answer is no. In שו"ע יו"ד סימן קכ"ד סעיף ב the Shulchan Aruch says: גר תושב, דהיינו שקבל עליו שבע מצות, וכן גר שמל ולא טבל – מגען אוסר בשתייה Ha-rav Leichtenstien claims that the שו"ע belives that it's not only a question of "What does this man do?" (an idolator), but rather "Who is he?". And that is why we can't drink wine that was opened ...


3

The shulchan aruch in Yoreh Deah siman 124 siff 7 says 'A nonjew who does not worship idols who touches wine without intention, the wine is muttar to drink'. The Shach there #12 actually brings an example of Yishmaelim from the Rambam and says the Mechaber left it because this is not limited to yishmaelim only, but anyone who doesn't worship idols is the ...


2

This depends on how exactly you hold that wine becomes yayin akum. Under the opinion that I personally follow, which I don't actually know the source of but was told by my LOR, the akum just looking at it is enough to make it "treyf vi chazzer" (non-kosher like pork). I've heard that this is actually a stringency, and that it just needs to be served to the ...


1

The vessels definitely can become assur and they can make other wine assur to drink, although they will be muttar bihanaa, i.e. you can sell it. Another difference is this wine which becomes assur from the vessels will be nullified in sixty. There are various details that matter though. See the Shulchan Aruch here. It depends on whether the vessel is made ...


1

The earliest source is the gemarah. Gemarah Shabbat 77a says that the standard ratio for dilution of wine with water (diluting wine was common in those times) was 3:1. The gemarah in Avoda Zara 73b says that if you have two cups of wine, one of which is forbidden and one isn't, and mix the two together, the resulting mixture is permitted. The Raavad and ...


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