15

In every bowling alley I've been to, the operation of the lanes depends on electro-mechanical devices that reset the pins and return the ball. As these actions are triggered by the bowler's bowling and are helpful to the bowler, they'd constitute a "pesik reisha denicha leih" - an expected consequence that's desirable - and would therefore be forbidden as ...


12

Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 421:5 says (in my own translation): Two who wrestled together, and one knocked the other to the ground so that he fell and got blinded, he's not liable. The S'ma explains: The reason for this is: Since they both wrestled willingly, each intending to knock down his fellow, and each knowing that it's impossible to be precise ...


10

This question is related to and emerged from a comment by the OP on whether plastic surgery was allowed. I think the question of which parameters allow us to engage in action/dangerous sports has merit. We can all agree that some sports (e.g., Formula 1 racing, sky-diving, boxing) are more dangerous than others, and as mentioned in a comment are not ...


8

The rolling ball is the "koach" of the original person, analogous to a thrown rock. When the ball then hits the pins/sensors/etc that action is "koach kocho" of the original person, meaning it is twice removed from the person himself (for the definition see the Rambam Hilchos Rotzeach 6:15). Now see the Avnei Nezer OH 230:2 who argues that "koach kocho" is ...


8

Rav Moshe Feinstein in his Igros Moshe Chelek 8:4 YD :11 writes that going to theaters and stadiums do not fall into the prohibition of bechukoseihem lo tolechu. However, he writes that one is prohibited from attending due to moshev letzim, bitul Torah (eventually l'gamri), nivul peh (promiscuity). Rav Moshe is clear that it is a forbidden to attend such ...


8

R Yehoshua Neuwirth in Shmirat Shabbat KeHilchata (vol. 1, p. 189 in the 2002 edition) allows basketball if played on a hard surface such as asphalt or concrete (but not on earth or grass) in an area with an eiruv one doesn't retrieve a ball which would have lodged in a tree (neither by hand, with a stick or by shaking the tree) There is a question whether ...


7

I think the question is the phrase "crying for chinam". My suspicion is it's not "you cried about something unimportant", rather it's "you cried when there was every reason not to." G-d had promised them they'd enter the land, and here they were crying "oh boo hoo we won't enter the land", there was no reason for them to be sad. Whereas if my favorite team ...


6

The Mishnah Brurah (549:1) explains that the main point of a fast is to do teshuvah, and not the fast itself: By Ninveh, concerning G-d undoing the decree to destroy them, it says "And G-d saw their actions," not "And G-d saw their fast." The fast is merely a preparation for the teshuvah. He continues, quoting the Chayei Adam, that those people who spend the ...


6

The Three Weeks by Rabbi Cohen pg 145-146 "One should try not to divert one's mind from mourning on Tishah B'Av. Therefore it is proper to refrain from all pleasurable activities, such as taking a stroll, reading the newspaper, listening to the radio, playing games."


5

The question revolves around whether or not you were מסיח דעת - a mental interruption or not. This question is a dispute among the poskim as to what is considered a hesech hadaas. The Shulchan Aruch (סימן ח' סי"ד) says ואם פשט טליתו אפילו היה דעתו לחזור ולהתעטף בו מיד צריך לברך כשיחזור ולהתעטף בו. If one took his Tallis off, even if he had in mind to ...


5

As far as I know, the reason for women not wearing pants doesn't have to do with their being male garments. Especially today, nobody thinks twice upon seeing a woman wearing pants. I believe that the main reason for wearing skirts over pants is due to tzniut (modesty); however, a large number of modern poskim rule that there is no problem at all with women ...


4

Aside from the fact that most prize fights are on Friday or Saturday night (often before Shabbos is out), I'm not sure there is a problem. Chabad apparently doesn't think so as they have heavily promoted one of their own, welterweight fighter Dmitriy Salita (35-1-1), since he became frum and turned pro 12 years ago. (He's fighting former champion Hector ...


4

From a responsum of R. Yitzchok Abadi (Ohr Yitzchok vol. 1 YD §26) it would seem to be prohibited on the basis of an opinion in the Talmud with regards to images forbidden to gaze upon (Meg. 28a). Additionally, according to his presentation of Rambam (AZ 10:4) it would certainly be prohibited to watch combat sports which is behavior that goes against Jewish ...


4

I found 1 Torah Musings says Minor activities are not considered to be work, nor a fulfillment of one’s own desires, and they are therefore permissible before prayer. For example, a person is permitted to make his bed before praying, and he is permitted to take the garbage from his house to the public garbage bin. Similarly, he is permitted to ...


4

The halachic category allowed to be worn laundered is beged ze'ah -- literally, "sweat clothes." Rabbi Cohen gave the example of undergarments, but a simple translation of the term would give you every indication that athletic clothing that gets truly sweaty would in fact be "sweat clothes." To second user6591's comment above, I have also heard an oral ...


4

If we are talking about somebody who suspects that he may fall to temptation and have inappropriate thoughts about the immodestly attired women there, it is forbidden. There are numerous issurim involved - gazing at inappropriate things is forbidden by לא תתורו אחרי לבבכם ואחרי עיניכם, and having inappropriate thoughts is forbidden under ונשמרת מכל דבר רע (...


4

According to Rabbi Elchanan Lewis on yeshiva.co there is no problem in sledding on shabbos as long as there's an eruv.


3

TL;DR: best to CYLOR In an answer titled "Men and Mixed Gyms," dinonline.org writes: There are two issues with a man going to a mixed gym. The first one is the same a going to a mixed beach- he will see women when they are dressed immodestly. The torah tells us, (Numbers 15-39) “Not to stay after our eyes”, and not to look at woman Included in this is ...


3

Rosh Hashana is a two-day holiday. If Wednesday night begins the first day, as noted by Ari Brodsky in a comment on the question, then playing on Thursday, either before or after sundown, doesn't help -- it's still Rosh Hashana, moving into the second day. If Wednesday night began the second day of Rosh Hashana (which isn't actually possible according to ...


3

In a Shi'ur I attended many years ago, Rav Binyamin Tabory of Yeshivat Har Etzion once expressed his opinion that the custom is to refrain from activities that are public experiences that enhance joy. To the extent that this is true, he felt that going to movies (which is something many people avoid during Sefirah) is perfectly acceptable from the Sefirah ...


3

From what Rabbi Jaeger and Rabbi Barclay write in their sefer "Guidelines: over 400 commonly asked questions about the Three Weeks," it appears that there is an outright prohibition on playing softball on Tisha b'Av. As they write, "A person should refrain from all pleasurable activities on Tisha B'Av. For example, one may not go for a stroll, read a ...


2

The Midrash (Eichah Rabbah 2:4) says that this is why Tur Shimon was destroyed: טור שמעון הוה מפיק תלת מאה גרבין ולמה חרב אי תימא מן הזנות והלא לא היתה אלא ריבה אחת והוציאוה משם אמר רב הונא משום שהיו משחקים בכדור בשבת Tur Shimon would distribute 300 baskets to the poor. Why was it destroyed? If it’s because of harlotry, there was just one [such] girl ...


2

I recently asked Rav Hershel Schachter this question. The Rosh Yeshiva responded to me with a long detailed discussion on this topic. In conclusion he held that it prohibited under the issur of Chavalah. (See end of Perek HaChovel). Rabbi Yosef Viener of Monsey also holds it prohibited.


2

I remember it being told (not so much taught) to me like this: R' Moshe Feinstein held you should take them off out of respect. R' JB Soloveitchik would remind people that they're washable (the implication being that he felt there was no need to take them off). Source: Word of mouth when I was a teenager.


2

I remember hearing Rabbi Bertram Left (former O-U Synagogues director and before that a shul rav) answer this question raised by his teenage daughter (now a Judaic studies teacher at Stern College). He instructed her to wear a loose skirt over her ski pants.


2

Many who play attach their Yarmulkas via a bobby pin or Kippon. This assures that it will remain on their head and not fall off while playing sports.


2

If memory serves, the Shulchan Aruch/Rama sound like a new bracha would be required, but contemporay poskim actually set a time limit when one intended to put it back on to begin with - I believe Rav Ovadiah Yosef, z"l, may have said 2hrs; ; Rav MosheFeinstein, z"l: 1 hour; and, yb"l, Rav Chaim Kanievsky, shlit"a: 30 minutes - after which such time has ...


2

Closest idea I've ever seen was daf 6b in Megila, where it says Germamia (Germania), and the Medrash in Toldos adds Barbaria, were used to occupy Rome's energies so they wouldn't have time to annihilate us.


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