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9

Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach contended that no bracha should be made on synthetic smells. However, most poskim disagreed and said that these smells warrant the standard bracha of Borei Minei Vesamim. Source


9

The sefer Semeichim Leshomro asks if a person with BO may pray. The author answers: He may pray. The odor probably comes from a lack of washing, not from excrement. Since he is probably used to his own smell, based on the Mishna Brura (86:1), there wouldn't be a problem. But wait. It seems to me personally: This Mishna Brura implies the opposite: that ...


9

As far as I know, your making an incorrect assumption about marijuana. However, assuming that you're correct in saying that smelling marijuana makes one feel good, then it should have the same rule as smelling 'tabak', a longstanding Jewish custom, which does not require a bracha. The Aruch Hashulchan (216:4) explains that smelling something for an ...


8

Mishne Berurah (Biur Halacha 216:2 s.v. haMusk) writes that one should not deliberately smell nonkosher food out of concern that they may be tempted to eat it. He reiterates his position in regards to smelling Chametz on Pesach which is also assur bahana'ah and all year long people eat it that one may not smell it on Pesach. However, closing one's nose is ...


7

Orach Chaim 297:5 - one who can not smell skips the Bracha of Borei Minei Besamim, unless he is being Motzi small children or ones who do not know how to make the Bracha.


7

A yeshiva.co article titled "Reciting Brachos in the Presence of Unpleasant Odors" addresses a very similar scenario: Only substances whose malodor results from decomposition prohibit reciting a bracha, but not inherently foul-smelling items, such as pitch (Chayei Odom 3:12; Mishnah Berurah 79:23). According to this ruling, one may recite a bracha in the ...


6

This article, by Rabbi Shubert Spero, says that the fashion started around the sixteenth century. He suggests that a tower symbolizes strength and security, and so it fits well with Havdalah, in which we speak of Hashem as our source of security ("כי עזי וזמרת י-ה"), and also that it is associated with the rebuilding of the Beis Hamikdash and the coming of ...


6

This list, compiled by R' Shimon Buchnik (a Sephardi rav in Chashmonaim) says one should recite "עצי בשמים" on thyme (בת קורנית), as you suggest. However, this source (from R' David Lau) says that the custom is to recite "עשבי בשמים" on thyme1 even though he says that one would think you should recite "מיני בשמים". Reiach HaSadeh (by R' Hanoch Slatin, p. ...


6

Another question on this site asks about whether or not one makes a bracha of marijuana. Most people who I've spoken to have told me that it smells terrible, or at least the smell is not pleasant in and of itself. (This is also the conclusion of this author , and one paper for the journal of clinical psychology assumes that it's reasonably close to the ...


6

Dinonline answers: Yes, if one smells a herbal tea with the intention of enjoying its scent, one should recite a berachah. If one takes the tea to drink it, and only smells the scent by the way, one would not make a blessing. Note that the scent of ordinary teas is not strong enough to warrant a blessing upon “enjoying the scent,” and only if the ...


5

The Kaf Hachayim on Yore Deah 108:70 and Darkei Teshuva 108:102 conclude that one may not smell those things that are Assur Behana'ah, but one may smell things that are only Assur Ba'achilah.


5

The primary source is the in Gemara in Bietza 23a which discusses Molid Re'ech - creating a smell on an object. Rashi (D'Ka Molid) there explains that it's a Rabbinic prohibition; it's similar to doing work. This does not apply to food items, according to most Poskim - and according to how we Pasken. The earlier Poskim argue if this applies to the body. ...


5

The issue is whether the smell bothers you, and will ruin your concentration. Eruvin 65a says that R. Samuel did not pray in a house that contained beer, because the smell bothered him. And R. Papa did not pray in a house that contained fish. So, if your BO isn't gross to you, it shouldn't be a problem.


5

As Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan points out, many say that the Biblical "myrrh" was an herb. However Rambam and others say it's musk. myrrh (Raavad, Kley HaMikdash 1:3; Ramban; Bachya; Septuagint). Mor in Hebrew. Myrrh is a gum resin produced by trees and shrubs of the family Burseracea, most notably Commiphora myrrha, Commiphora abysinica, and Commiphora ...


5

There is Orla only for a tree that was planted for eating. See Rash Orla 1.1 פטור מן הערלה. כדדריש בירושלמי (הלכה א) (ויקרא יט) ונטעתם כל עץ מאכל את שהוא למאכל חייב So, because roses are generally not cultivated for eating, there is no din Orla and you can smell their perfume. Ruled in SA YD 294.1 הנוטע עץ מאכל מונה לו ג' שנים מעת נטיעתו וכל הפירות ...


4

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 614:1) rules: אסור לסוך אפילו מקצת גופו, ואפילו אינו אלא להעביר הזוהמא It is forbidden to anoint even a part of ones body, even if it is only to remove bad filth/odor/?. This site cites Rav Elyashiv as recommending against spray deodorant because it is a "cosmetic", implying that on a more basic level it should be permitted. They ...


4

Without addressing your specific examples, the answer is: Yes, you can say a bracha on burning incense, but only once the pillar of smoke rises up from the burnt spices (Shulchan Arukh OC 216:12). You say whatever blessing you would have said on the spices themselves (ibid. :13).


4

HaRav Moshe Levi ZSWQ"L (Birkat Hashem vol. 3 12:3) and Maran HaRav Ovadia Yosef Zswq"l (Hazon Ovadia - Tu Beshvat/Berachot pg. 331) write not to make a blessing on snuff.


4

Shulchan Aruch 216,1 writes that one can make a bracha only on pleasant aromas. There is some question as to whether the smell of marijuana is particularly pleasant (both fresh or burnt) and this may depend on the particular variety. Many describe it as skunk like or reminiscent of body odor and, if so, it cannot be used for besamim. If the smell is ...


3

Rabbi Shmuel Pinchas Gelbard says this is done for the love of the Mitzva כמו כן יש נוהגים להריח את השעווה לאחר כיבוי הנר, וזאת משום חיבוב מצווה


3

I'm no posek, but my guess would be that no bracha should be made. The Shulchan Aruch (217:2-3) writes, based on the Gemara (Brachos 51b), that one only makes a bracha on something that were made for the purpose of smelling nice, and not for smells that were added to something that has a primary purpose other than mere smelling. Even something meant to be ...


3

Rav Sternbuch in Tshuvos Vnhanhagos 2:134 brings down that there were gedolim who didn't do besamim by havadalah because of Hanaah(pleasure) problems for bracha.This also comes from the gemara in brachos 53 and Rishonim.


3

Yeshiva.org.il Ask the Rabbi writes: Both opinions are mentioned. I personally use besamim. On Motzei Shabbat which is yom tov, no besamim are used since the bessamim "revive " us from the shock of losing our elevated status (neshama yetara), but the joy of yom tov makes this unnecessary. Chol Hamoed also has joy, but not to the same degree. ...


3

The question starts with when you can fulfil someone else's obligation by saying a blessing for them. The Rambam (Brachot 1:10) writes (based on Bavli RH 29): כל הברכות כולן, אף על פי שבירך ויצא ידי חובתו, מותר לו לברך לאחרים שלא יצאו ידי חובתן, כדי להוציאן--חוץ מברכת ההניה שאין בה מצוה, שאינו מברך לאחרים אלא אם כן נהנה עימהן. אבל ברכת ההניה שיש בה מצוה--...


3

Berachos 43b: איזהו דבר שהנשמה נהנית ממנו ואין הגוף נהנה ממנו, הוי אומר זה הריח What is a thing that the soul benefits from and the body does not? That is the sense of smell


3

In fact there is a discussion in the Shulchan Aruch(Rama) OC 216 regarding making a bracha on the smell of hot bread. Since it is a safek it is best not to smell it year round specifically for its pleasant smell. There are those who hold even if you did smell it you shouldn't make a bracha. יד. המריח באתרוג של מצוה מברך עליו ויש אומרים שאינו מברך לכך נכון ...


3

Rashi doesn't say anything about the spices being helpful for getting over emotional trauma. וגמליהם נושאים וגו' - למה פרסם הכתוב את משאם להודיע מתן שכרן של צדיקים שאין דרכן של ערביים לשאת אלא נפט ועטרן שריחן רע ולזה נזדמנו בשמים שלא יוזק מריח רע He explains that they brought spices so that bad smell of their usual wares wouldn't bother him.


3

Cocaine is a Schedule II substance, which means that a) it has a high potential for abuse, b) it has some accepted medicinal use for treatment, and c) abuse of the substance can lead to severe psychological or physiological dependence. It was used as a topical anesthetic and some ENTs used to use it as a means to clear a patient's sinuses when administered ...


3

R Jack Abramowitz from OU writes If a person who is praying or learning Torah passes wind, he must pause until the offensive odor dissipates. The same is true if he is davening and a person in his vicinity breaks wind. However, if one is studying Torah, he does not have to wait because of a smell that comes from another person. A person must ...


2

I found this "Ultra Regeneration Serum" via Amazon. It costs $83.99 per bottle and claims to contain "Commiphora Gileadensis Bud Extract- (Balm of Gilead)." However, its description mentions "Balm of Gilead from the balsam poplar tree," and the balsam poplar tree is Populus balsamifera, which is a North American species and distinct from the Middle Eastern ...


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