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16

Humans are liable for damages caused while sleeping (Mishna Bava Kamma 2:6) unless they went to sleep far from things to be damaged and someone else placed something to be damaged near them (Yerushalmi ibid.). As the Rambam puts it (Mazik 1:11): אדם מועד לעולם בין שוגג בין מזיד בין ער בין ישן בין שכור אם חבל בחבירו או הזיק ממון חבירו משלם מן היפה שבנכסיו....


13

The Gemara (Yoma 78b) writes that one who sleeps with shoes on, 'has tasted a taste of death', and since tasting death is probably not a good thing, some poskim write that sleeping with shoes on should be avoided (see Kaf Hahayyim Y.D 116:211, for example). The book Shemiras Haguf Vehanefesh (no. 115) also writes that wearing shoes to sleep causes someone to ...


12

The sefer "Zikaron L'Moshe" (pg. 65) writes that the Chasam Sofer originally understood that the reason one must wait six hours after meat, is because that is how long it takes to digest the food, and therefore this only applies to one who ate a meal in the day. However, when one sleeps the food digests quicker, and he may eat milk even before six hours are ...


10

I heard this from Rav Shmuel Eliyahu: Dina D'malchuta Dina is limited to laws that are: Enforced in practice by the government, Apply equally to all citizens, and do not contradict Torah. Even if a consumer of a mattress were forbidden by law to remove the label there would have to be some kind actual enforcement of that law to bring it ...


10

Taamei Haminhagim (citing Machazeh Avraham, by R. Avraham of Buczacz) says that it is because the ushpiza for the seventh day of Sukkos is King David, and he used to stay up all night studying Torah - so we do the same to evoke his corresponding Divine attribute. R. Chaim Vital (Pri Eitz Chayim and Shaar Hakavanos, cited in Nitei Gavriel) give a different ...


10

A Driver’s Liability in Halacha and Civil Law deals with the issue of automobile liability in modern times. Over and above the concept of Adam Muad Leolam. This means that even if halacha were to say patur in a particular case, the fact that a person gets a drivers license and insurance, means that he is voluntarily subjecting himself to the secular law of ...


8

The Mishna Berura (2:11) quoted in the linked article brings from the Shaloh Hakadosh that while not required by the strict letter of the law it is considered "midas chassidus" (pious behavior) to cover one's head while sleeping.


8

Rabbi Bodner (Halachos of Refuah on Shabbos) writes (page 242) that insomnia is classified as a מיחוש בעלמא, an "ailment" that isn't serious. (though if someone suspects that they suffer from chronic insomnia, they should see a sleep specialist after Shabbos) The rules for מיחוש בעלמא are found in chapter 1 of that work; the most basic rule being that one ...


8

Not a problem in the slightest. Pleae ignore it and continue to serve God by wearing your Tefilin. If this hangup is preventing you from doing mitzvos in a positive manner, please consult a competent rabbi and/or mental health professional. Rambam, laws of Tefilin, Mezuzah, and Sefer Torah 4:13 וכל הטמאין, כולן חייבין בתפילין כטהורין The incontinent ...


8

If the bed reminds the husband of his first wife and makes him think about her while with the 2nd wife, then he should not use that bed Nedarim 20b quoted in Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 240,2: ולא תתורו אחרי לבבכם מכאן אמר רבי אל ישתה אדם בכוס זה ויתן עיניו בכוס אחר אמר רבינא לא נצרכא אלא דאפילו ב' נשיו "And you shall not be swayed after your heart"(...


7

Maybe the reason to fall asleep specifically through the process of drinking wine is to remember the miracle which was done through wine at the different wine parties in the Book of Esther as outlined here: Can you use Liquor to fulfill Ad Dlo Yoda? EDIT: I challenge your assumption that the two rules are separated. The Rambam writes in Megillah 2:15: `...


7

Kitzur Shulcah Aruch1 17:1 says of the Sh'ma: After a third of the day has passed, one should recite the Shema alone, without the blessings, because it is forbidden to recite the blessings beyond this time. The Shema itself, though, may be recited the entire day. (Other authorities also allow the recitation of the blessings throughout the day.) A ...


7

As part of "Naps in Jewish Law", R' Gil Student discusses this: The Shulchan Arukh (Orach Chaim 231:1), following the Talmud (Sukkah 26b) [English here], rules that napping for more than half an hour is forbidden and even that little sleep should only be undertaken if your intent is to gain strength so you can learn Torah and serve God better. This is ...


7

The Rama (Orach Chayim 583:2) says that some have the practice not to sleep on Rosh HaShanah, and it is a correct practice. The Taz (3) quotes the source of this: The Yerushalmi which says "Whoever sleeps on Rosh HaShanah, his luck sleeps." The Magen Avraham (6) quotes the Arizal, that it is permissible to sleep after midday, since the angel (of "luck," I ...


7

2 potential answers, neither of which has been researched. First, psychological: Achashverosh didn't want to owe anyone anything. He didn't actually care about Mordechai or his people; he cared about his record (the potentially public knowledge that he doesn't repay his debts). Second, textual: As far as I can tell, Haman never identifies his ...


7

Short answer: no, it's not a formal prohibition, but it's still wrong to prevent someone from sleeping. From http://www.dinonline.org/2013/11/05/gezel-sheina-stealing-sleep/ The sefer “Ve-Ahavta Le-Re’acha Kamocha” notes that Rav Chaim of Brisk used the expression “gezel sheina,” implying that waking somebody up needlessly is a form of theft. ...


7

Waking a fellow shiur-mate cannot be more severe than waking one's parents. The Kitzur in סימן קמג - הלכות כבוד אב ואם says the following about waking them: סעיף ד': הָיוּ אָבִיו אוֹ אִמּוֹ יְשֵׁנִים וּמַפְתֵּחַ חֲנוּתוֹ שֶׁל הַבֵּן תַּחַת רָאשֵׁיהֶם, אָסוּר לַהֲקִיצָם מִשְּׁנָתָם, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁיַפְסִיד רֶוַח הַרְבֵּה. אֲבָל אִם יַגִּיעַ רֶוָח ...


7

I found this "Halacha" in the Kaf HaChaim, Orach Chaim 240:63 ישכב תמיד במטה מיוחדת בפני עצמו. ואם צריך לשמש לשם מצות פו׳׳ר אחר גמר .השימוש כמו חצי שעה יקום וישוב למטה היוחד לו. אור הצדיקים סי׳ כז׳ אות ג׳ Furthermore, in Sefer Piskei Teshuvos, (pamphlet on Siman 240, footnote 226), the author quotes his father as being against the practice of having a ...


7

In Tephichas BeDevash 24 by Rav Chiya Pontromili (a Sefardi Rav from the 19th century quoted here) writes: ואף שנהגו ישראל להיות ערים בליל שבועות אפילו שחל בשבת, מכל מקום שונה ליל שבועות מליל שבת, משום שבליל שבועות יש בו סודות גדלים, שעל ידי נדידת השינה ולימוד התורה בעשרה הנעשה באותו הלילה, מתקנים תכשיטים לכלה, וכמה מעלות טובות מפורשות בזוהר הקדוש על ענין ...


7

This is indeed brought down by some as the Halacha, and in practice, both positions (face up and face down) are forbidden. See the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 71:5: וְצָרִיךְ לִזָּהֵר מְאֹד לְהַרְגִּיל אֶת עַצְמוֹ לִשְׁכַּב עַל צִדּוֹ. וְאִסּוּר גָּדוֹל לִשְׁכַּב פְּרַקְדָּן, דְּהַיְנוּ גַּבּוֹ לְמַטָּה וּפָנָיו לְמַעְלָה, אוֹ בְּהִפּוּךְ פָּנָיו לְמַטָּה ...


6

No sources that I know of, but a couple of possibilities: It shows how devoted these students were to their teacher - they wanted to be able to study from him at all hours (and, if he wasn't up to teaching, they'd at least be able to review what they had already learned). Conversely, it shows how devoted the teacher was, that he'd be sitting and teaching ...


6

You wash your hands before davenings and with a bracha only before the shacharit one (assuming you have gone to the bathroom since davening maariv which seems highly likely) You never say Birkot Hatorah as you never really take a break. Ideally you can have someone be motzi you in them after olot hashachar. You can say Birkot HaShachar starting from chatzot ...


6

The Rashb"o in Chindushai HaHagodos (Mosad Horav Kook) to Brochos 54b states that after a long halachik discussion the Ameroim switched to Agadato to awaken the students.


6

Sefer Lidrosh Elokim mentions in the name of the Shevet Musar 40 in the name of Sefer Kanfei Yonah 3:9 that saying גָּ֖ד גְּד֣וּד יְגוּדֶ֑נּוּ וְה֖וּא יָגֻ֥ד עָקֵֽב three times the regular way and three times backwards is a protection for Keri.


6

NOTE: both of these are only partial answers; the 1st may be against the Rashba and the 2nd is disputed First Answer The simplest answer might be that the times of getting up and going to sleep are based on when non-Jews, who are exempt from Shema, wake up (after all, non-Jews do make up the vast majority of the human population). Rishonim (see Tos. 2b) ...


6

Shmirat Shabbat K'hilchatah 33:16 writes: מי שמצטער הרבה מחוסר שינה, מותר לו לקחת כדורי-שינה. Someone who suffers greatly from lack of sleep (insomnia) is allowed to take sleeping pills. (my translation) If even sleeping pills are allowed for someone who suffers greatly from insomnia, then some tea should certainly be OK.


6

The Mishna Brura (Beiur Halachah 239:1, s.v. samuch) questions whether one should say it if he thinks he will not fall asleep before Alos HaShachar, even if it is currently before Alos HaShachar, and says that it should definitely not be said after Alos HaShachar. The Shaari Teshuva O.C. 239:1 s.v. 2 mentions opinions based on Kabbalistic reasons that one ...


5

To start, it is pretty settled that dina d'malchusa dina applies to paying taxes. According to the Ran in Nedarim 28a, "paying taxes is like paying rent, it is the cost you pay for living in that country." (see also the Rama in Choshen Mishpat 369:6). Rabbi Joseph Solovechik also held that one should not shop at a store where you know the owner does not ...


5

As stated, in the mattress example, that tag is there to prevent mattress manufacturers from putting all sorts of awful stuff in their mattresses and consumers not knowing. Once you've read the "ingredients label" and have bought the mattress, you can do whatever you want with it. (Well if you go to sell it to someone else it gets tricky ...) So rip away! ...


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