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11

Rabbi Moshe Isserlis writes (YD 275:6) about various scribal traditions including large/small letters that אם שינה לא פסל - if [the scribe] deviated, he did not invalidate [the scroll]. Obviously if they can be fixed, one should do so to conform with the tradition.


11

Yes, there are standard sizes, though obviously there are usually going to slight variations in fit for every pair of handmade tefilin. The sizes seem to be measured by cm2 millimeters. Based on my experience they tend to err towards a looser fit; I usually adjust this by adding a sticker or a piece of paper on the inside. This piece is sometimes called a "...


9

To answer your question: It's been said in the name of Reb Chaim Kanievsky that one should not hide one's Peyot behind one's ears, but he never says to cut them. There are plenty well respected Rabbis who hide their Peyot behind their ears, and others who have trimmed Peyot . Just to put this in context, let's go back to basics - using classic sources. ...


8

This is an argument amongst the achronim. See Yoreh Deah siman 178. The Shulchan Aruch writes not to grow one's hair like the non Jews do and not to shave the sides while leaving the hair on top. Shach there #1 brings the Ateres Zahav who says this is actually all one prohibition. Don't grow hair like them which is shaven on the sides etc. The Shach goes ...


5

Mincha Gedola is three hours long thus it is the big Mincha. Mincha Ketana is 2 1/2 hours long thus it is the small Mincha. Regarding Plag Hamincha it is the time in between Mincha Ketana and Shekiya, which is half of the time of the Mincha remaining. It does not mean the half time between the two Minchas as there is no Halachic significance to that time. ...


4

When I was learning in Israel, someone posted an article written by R' Aharon Lichtenstein about having long hair. If I recall correctly, there were 3 issues he raised and evaluated: 1) Interruption for tefillin: There is a dispute between the Machatzis Hashekel and the Pri Megadim as to whether hair is an interruption on the spot it is grown, or ...


4

Olas Yitzchak 292 says it is known from the times of the Rambam even though the Rambam did not hold it was necessary. He brings in the name of the Sefer Shaar HaMitzvos - Rabbi Chaim Vital - Parshas Kedoshim in the name of the Arizal. Ben Ish Chai in his Sefer Ben Ish Chayil says that when Mordechai was Muchtar Binimuso it means long Paiyos.


4

I'm not sure about Rav Ben-Tzion Abba Shaul (I'd be very interested in hearing if anyone knows), but Rav Menashe Klein (Mishneh Halachos 7:121) quotes from R. Chaim Zvi Manheimer that people who grow their payos long and hide them behind their ears do look as if they're embarassed that they're performing a mitzvah, and that's a problem. Personally, I would ...


4

R. Heshie Billet records the following story in Mentor of Generations: Reflections on Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik At YU this Boston boy was one of the organizers of a big protest. Flyers went up all over campus. The flyers included some comments about Israel. The Rov was strongly opposed to mixing Israel with Vietnam. At the beginning of shiur one say, he ...


4

The Talmud, also in Zevachim later on (97b), identifies the biblical 'mizrak' with the 'agan' (אגן); see also Ex. 24:6. Elsewhere in the Talmud (Ber. 22a), the agan is depicted as a tub that can contain enough water to bathe in (9 kav; aprox. 3 gallons). (In biblical descriptions they are both typically used to illustrate large, excessive/exaggerated ...


3

The Rambam (MT Ma'achalot Asurot 9:10) writes If the milk fell into the sauce or onto all the pieces and it was not known on which piece [the milk] fell he should stir the entire pot so that all its contents will be mixed [thoroughly]. If the flavor of milk [can be detected] in the entire pot, it is forbidden. If not, it is permitted. If a gentile ...


3

It's not clear which practice you are looking to find the rational for, the larger or the smaller, but see the first tshuva in the Igros Moshe where he discusses Reb Shlomo Kluger's ruling to cover the majority of one's head. Reb Moshe says that it is a nice stringency to keep, but one is not obligated to be stringent, especially since most people are not ...


3

DoubleAA is correct that a Torah that is missing scribal traditions is still valid. However, if another Torah is available, the Torah inconsistent with tradition should not be used. (see Shevet HaLevi 4, Yoreh Deah 141) In addition, if the Torah was from a tradition that normally conforms with the small and large letters and, nevertheless, is consistently ...


3

Per Rabbi Shraga Simmons at About.com: Question: Why do male Chasidic Jews have the long side curls in their hair? Answer: The Torah says, "You shall not round off the peyos of your head" (Leviticus 19:27). The word peyos refers to sideburns -- i.e. the hair in front of the ears that extends to underneath the cheekbone which is level with the nose ...


3

See Rabbi Neustadt’s book which quotes the Mishnah Berurah 27: 15 to say that long hair is not a natural outgrowth of the body and therefore constitutes a chatzitzah between the head and the head-tefila. There are however lenient opinions. There is a long article by Rabbi Aryeh Lebowitz - this is his conclusion: While one who grows long hair cannot be ...


3

Rabbi Natan Slifkin has an extensive presentation of all the different sides of the kezayis discussion here. He brings many opinions that actually do hold that the correct size of the kezayis is the actual size of an olive: R. Chaim of Volozhin (1749-1821) is widely revered as the father of the yeshivah world. Less known and certainly less popular in ...


3

Midrash Sefer Hayashar says that a third of the tower was swallowed by the ground, a third consume by fire and a third remained. והשלישית ממנו נשאר עד היום הזה ויהי ממנו אשר תלוי ברוח השמים ויהי מהלך צלו שלשת ימיםה The third that remained until this day, its shadow was the length of 3 days travel. (the shadow represents the height of the tower which a ...


3

The table on page 86 (page 22 in the PDF) of Sheldon Epstein, Bernard Dickman, and Yonah Wilamowsky's paper "Parsha Management — Doubling, Halving, Accuracy"[1] is of the parashiyos and their lengths. According to the data in that table, we have: Counting each parasha separately, the deciles are 176 (100%), 148 (90%), 134 (80%), 122&...


3

According to this link, which I received in an answer to a question about Spanish-Portuguese minhagim, the "scarf-like" tallit (or tallet) is originally from their community. As you can see below, the ba'alei battim, the chazzan, and the chacham all wear the style in question.


3

A mezuzah case is really only a way to extend the halachik doorpost such that there is no need to actually insert the klaf into the doorpost itself, so inherently, size should not be a halachik issue. Even with regard to the mezuzah klaf (parchment) itself, as long as it can fit in the appropriate place on the doorpost (bottom of top third, not within the ...


3

Rambam Parah Adumah 9:8 says that once the water has been mixed with the ashes, no further water can be added to further dilute the mixture. Once it has been made, an additional Parah Adumah is required to make more and add to the water. Thus, if any other water accidentally drops in, the entire mixture is pasul. When even the smallest amount of other ...


2

If one eats enough bread to be satisfied, the chiyuv of ברכת המזון ("the beracha acharona for bread") is d'oraysa. According to many opinions, this is not the case for other berachos. Some may dispute this for "ברכה אחת מעין שלוש" ("al hamichya"), but anyways eating that much mezonos (if its פת הבא בכיסנין ) will normally require a full ברכת המזון . The ...


2

The mishna (Menachos 83–86) says all flour and wine offerings must be brought from top-quality produce: it lists various criteria for choosing produce, some of which, if not met, invalidate the offering. The g'mara (87) explains that top-quality animals, too, were chosen.


2

Dr. Zvi Ron opines that iron was considered a precious metal in those times and thus Og's bed may have been a decorative treasure item. [This is now my own conjecture] Therefore the Torah may be describing the magnitude of the spoils


2

Pirke De’Rabbi Eliezer (ch. 24) gives the height dimension as being “seven(ty) mil”: רבי פנחס אומר לא היו שם אבנים לבנות את העיר ואת המגדל מה היו עושין היו מלבנים לבנים ושורפין אותן כיוצר חרש עד שבנו אותו גבוה שבעים מיל (Note: the Hebrew edition reads “seventy” while the English ed. by Gerald Friedlander, provided also at the above link to Sefaria, has “...


2

Tiny spots, or even larger ones, on the batim do not invalidate the tefillin. (MB 32:184 However, white spots on the straps, especially on the first loop which fastens the bayit to your arm do and must be fixed. These are very common and most people don't notice them right away. (Mishna Berurah 33:3:19)


2

The question is extremely relevant as some people (e.g with allergies to gluten) are unable to eat Matza on Pesach and more than a few crumbs could be fatal, so as far as we're concerned they are the "shrunk kids" and whether it’s worth it for them to eat a few crumbs which they are able to muster is a very important question. The Shulchan Aruch O.C 612,1 ...


2

As other people have mentioned in the comments: Nazirites had to have long hair as part of their vow. It's hard to conceive that the Biblical Category of Nazirites, given directly from the Torah by God, and associated with higher holiness, would be violating a prohibition. Also the Rabbis in the gemara never mention anything problematic with the Nazirites ...


2

What you were told on many occasions is incorrect. The Binas Adam (85/66) says specifically that holding a large amount such as 40 sa'ah is not a good reason to negate the need for tevila. (There is a discussion there concerning vessels which are attached to the ground.) The Chachmas Adam there (klal 73:13) is discussing large vessels and he rules they ...


1

According to the Schottenstein Edition of Berachos, 26b2 note 24, "the earlier portion, called mincha gedola, "greater minchah" [because the greater portion of the day remains -- see Perishah, Orach Chaim 232:5], and the latter portion, known as minchah ketana, "lesser minchah" [because only a small portion of the day remains]." The gemara there (as noted ...


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