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The Sifrei, commenting on the verse to love the LORD your God, states: שמא תאמר הריני למד תורה בשביל שאעשיר בשביל שאקרא רבי בשביל שאקבל שכר לעולם הבא תלמוד לומר לאהבה את ה' אלהיכם כל שאתם עושים לא תהו עושים אלא מאהבה Lest one say "I will study Torah in order to become wealthy, in order to be called 'rabbi', [or] in order that I will receive reward in ...


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It means "causing damage to the public". In context, people who come in contact with one another are at risk of giving each other COVID-19 and spreading it further.


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Sanhedrin 38b contains a chronology of Adam's first day, in which the births of Cain and Abel precede Adam and Eve's sin: Rabbi Yoḥanan bar Ḥanina says: Daytime is twelve hours long, and the day Adam the first man was created was divided as follows: In the first hour of the day, his dust was gathered. In the second, an undefined figure was fashioned. In ...


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According to Sforno, yes: both pain and other issues on childbirth and pregnancy mentioned in this verse indicates that the exact opposite occurred before their sin. her pregnancy will be exactly the opposite of what it had been before she sinned. (Translation from Sefaria) On regard the other question, if they had a child before they sinned, the answer is ...


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The Netziv's introduction to Shir HaShirim deals with this a lot. People had an innate desire to connect to G-d, and for hundreds of years were able to do so in their own backyards. Then along came the Temple in Jerusalem and suddenly they were told "you can't do those anymore; you have to take all that religious passion and funnel it in a much more limited, ...


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The Torah Temimah in a footnote asks this exact question: ויש להעיר בעיקר כלל זה לא דברה תורה אלא כנגד יצה"ר, הלא לפי"ז לא שבקית קיום לכל מצוה, דנימא דכיון שאפשר שיעבור באיסור נתיר לו שיעשה בהיתר, וי"ל דלא נאמר כלל זה אלא במלחמה, דאז צריך שיהי' רוח כל איש נכון בקרבו ולא יצער נפשו כדי שיוכל לעמוד בקשרי מלחמה, וכמבואר בס"פ שופטים בענין ...


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Good question. The truth is that during times of war, a soldier is allowed to eat non-kosher food if kosher food is not available. The way the Rambam sounds, allowing foreign women is a similar concession, but the Torah put a restriction on it that the soldier must marry the woman, and not just leave her. See here. חֲלוּצֵי צָבָא כְּשֶׁיִּכָּנְסוּ בִּגְבוּל ...


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The notion of Yefas Toar is something that is very hard to comprehend. However when taken within the context of war and the resulting environment, Rabbi Frand helps to paint a clearer picture. He writes here: War is an environment the likes of which we should never know. It is a dehumanizing experience, which does crazy things to people. One has only to ...


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So perhaps a starting point is to first look at the opening clause of the Mishna. It begins: "Rabbi Jacob says: if one is studying while walking on the road and interrupts his study" The first issue that is being criticised is the fact that a person is learning in a non-ideal scenario. Whilst on face value nowadays walking along the road doesn't seem so ...


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Rambam in Chapter Seven of Shemoneh Perakim writes: It is not necessary for a prophet to have mastered all the ethical virtues to the point that he does not possess any shortcomings at all. (Touger translation p. 43) He then provides various examples of prophets having shortcomings, the last of which is: And Jacob feared Esau. (Touger translation p. 44)


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The Sefer HaYovelot (or Yovelim) is the oldest existing Midrash/perush on the Chumash (that we have today), and it dates back to the times of the Hashmonaim. It states that Adam and Hava had children only after the Chet ובראש החודש הרביעי יצאו האדם ואשתו מגן עדן וישבו בארץ אלדד בארץ אשר נבראו שם And on the new moon of the fourth month, Adam and his ...


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Language like this is often used in the Mishna, Gemara, and other halachic works. Here are a few examples: Taanit 11a: אמר שמואל כל היושב בתענית נקרא חוטא Shmuel said: Whoever sits in observance of a fast is called a sinner. SA YD 203:1: אל תהי רגיל בנדרים כל הנודר אף ע"פ שמקיימו נקרא רשע ונקרא חוטא: Do not become accustomed to making vows. Anyone ...


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Let's assume the divorced Jewish woman had a proper, halachic Gett, so she is actually divorced from the perspective of halacha. (Otherwise this gets very dicey, very fast.) As stated about a similar situation: Because Judaism allowed a man to have more than one wife, until a thousand years ago, technically a married man could go find another woman without ...


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The Rambam in הילכות עבודת כוכבים פרק יא:י״ג says the following: כללו של דבר כל העושה כדי שיבוא המת ויודיעו לוקה. It is clear from his language that one has to be attempting to communicate in order to get a response. In the example you give, and what is common among people, the person is not seeking a response, but is rather just speaking to the ether and ...


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The story of Rav Amnon, printed in most machzorim under Unisana Tokef and taken from the Or Zerua (Rosh hashana 266) could be taken as evidence that it is. In that story, a bishop asks Rav Amnon to convert to Christianity, and he asks for three days to think about it. Rav Amnon was very worried about the chilul Hashem, and the rest is legend. However, the ...


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'Evil' in this context does not mean sin. It means the evil that will befall them, namely the punishments that will come as a result of their sins (see Rashi's commentary to verse 15). Tanach tries to avoid directly mentioning terrible things happening to the Jewish people, not the Jewish people sinning.


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While it is true that you have to recognize the beauty of nature, it shouldn't be done at the expense of Torah study. The רע"ב on that mishnah in Pirkei Avos (3:7) says מַעֲלִין עָלָיו כְּאִלּוּ מִתְחַיֵּב בְּנַפְשׁוֹ, מִפְּנֵי שֶׁהִפְסִיק מִמִּשְׁנָתוֹ Scripture considers it as if he was liable for his life, because he interrupted his study Since he ...


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I am quoting an excerpt of "Jewish Magic and Superstition" by Joshua Trachtenberg (1939) found on pages 143-144 (titled "Preparation of Amulets"): The popular addiction to this form of magic was so strong that it was futile to prohibit altogether the use of amulets on the Sabbath, and instead a set of rules was created which distinguished between ...


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A source to start with is Shabbos 67a-b, where R. Meir allows certain practices that have no natural basis, while the Chachamim forbid them as darkei ha-Emori, the ways of the pagan Amorites. The Gemara there lays down a basic rule, which is accepted as halachah (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 301:27): כל דבר שהוא משום רפואה אין בו משום דרכי האמורי Any ...


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The problem was not the census itself, but that David counted the people directly, instead of using something else to count them (Saul used shards of pottery to count the people. Each one gave a shard and then he counted the shards). See Yuma 22B. Read all about it here, and some reasons given here.


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The Derech Hashem states quite clearly that those whom are too evil to get cleansed through punishment are rewarded in this world for any good they may have done and are completely removed from existence after death.


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There are too many questions and factors here to address all of them but a simple distinction can be made between the question and the examples given: Hashem does not punish any individual for the actions of others. When a group is being punished there may be innocent individuals who also suffer but that is not as a punishment per se. In modern day terms an ...


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To 'earn' the karet punishment one must sin b'meizid - knowingly (First Rashi in Masecta Kritut). The required knowledge is a. knowing that the action is a prohibited at the time, and b. knowing the punishment for the sin. Sources: There are two prerequisites for a beit din (Jewish court of law) to administer any kind of physical punishment (whether ...


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See Rashi who explains that חַטָּאָ (sin) are mistakes, עָוֺן (iniquity) refers to sinning knowingly, and פֶשַׁע (transgression) is rebellious behavior. I suggest that what is done by accident is not an indication of who someone is and what they are passing on to their children, so it doesn't pass through the generations. Something which is done ...


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To add authority (in case it matters to you) I would point to the Rambam, who says, that when a sin is committed (or transgressed) unintentionally, one should do Teshuva and aim not to repeat the sin again. They should also be prompted to ask forgiveness from a friend harmed, if any, and go on with their lives. Additionally, Sin (Chet in Hebrew) means to ...


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Yes and no. If he genuinely regrets the path that he chose and would never do a similar thing again knowing the halacha, he can be forgiven for the rebelliousness of his previous actions (as he didn't know, they were never rebellious in the first place. However, if he were not to have any regret, that would have been a rebellion). However, as he persists in ...


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I'll try to give this question a go: Would a Jew who believes completely in all 13 Principles of Jewish faith be more pious in the eyes of Hashem than a Jew who does everything right while having doubts? Not necessarily. Yes, it's true that the Rambam in the introduction to his commentary on Perek Chelek writes: וּכְשֶׁנִּתְקַלְקֵל לאדם יסוד מאלה ...


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With apologies to @user8375, Leviticus 18:24 refers to all forms of sexual immorality, including incest, homosexuality, and bestiality among others (the various forms mentioned in the preceding part of the chapter). 20:23, again referring to the preceding part of that chapter), repeats the injunctions against sexual immorality, but expands it with idol ...


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