12

Mishna Berura 660:1:3 says that when the Sefer Torah is on the Bimah those on the Mizrach (eastern wall) turn around to face the Torah their right side is now facing Tzafon (north) therfore they start in that direction.


8

If the first day of Rosh Hashanah falls out on Monday or Tuesday (as it did this year): Nitzavim alone is read on the Shabbos before Rosh Hashanah. Vayeilech is read between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Haazinu is read between Yom Kippur and Sukkos. A special reading, taken from Parshas Ki Sisa, is read on Shabbos Chol Hamoed. Vezos Habracha is read on ...


7

As indicated by msh210, it is a common custom on Simchas Torah to turn the Sefer Torah outwards when doing Hagbah after reading V'zos habrachah (the very end of the Pentateuch), and some do it for B'reishis Bara (The beginning) and Maftir (the day's offerings) too. Some Ashkenazim do it both by night and by day, some only in the morning, and some not at all....


7

There is a Rambam (Laws of Sefer Torah 10:8 based on Berakhot 22a) which explicitly permits niddot to touch a sefer Torah Any impure person, even [a woman in] a niddah state or a gentile, may hold a Torah scroll and read it. SA YD 282:9 rules the same Some poskim disagree based on minhag, e.g., here but see the end of R Weiss article showing many ...


6

My local orthodox rabbi told us that on Simchas Torah, Korach jumps and yells "Moshe emes v'Toraso emes" in admission that he was wrong to rebel against Moshe Rabbeinu. In celebration of Korach's defeat, our rabbi jumps during the dancing in imitation of Korach on the words "Moshe emes v'Toraso emes". My conjecture is that throwing children is a natural ...


6

I know that this is the custom of R. Yitzchok Ezrachi in the Mir Yeshiva in Yerushalayim, but I have no idea whether it was done in the earlier days of the yeshiva. The practice must be at least a century old, considering that it is mentioned in a story written by the maskil D. Y. Silberbusch (see here - published 1905), as well as in a story written by the ...


5

from Halachipedia: Tosfot (Beitzah 30a s.v. Tenan) writes that the gezerah of Chazal only applied then when they were experts in fixing musical instruments but it wouldn’t apply to us since we’re not experts in that area. The Bet Yosef 339:3 writes that the implication of all the poskim who simply copy the prohibition of the Mishna is that they do not hold ...


5

Nitey Gavriel (Rosh Hashana pg. 153) brings the custom to have white paroches etc until after Yom Kippur. In Nitey Gavriel (Sukkos pg. 362) he brings the Maharil, Sharey Efrayim and Minhagei Amsterdam who say to put up white paroches etc. on Hashana Rabba - implying that they had already been changed back from Rosh Hashana. However he writes (without citing ...


5

From Nitei Gavriel Succos 94:11:14 it seems to be a more recent Minhag. כתר שם טוב ח״ז עמוד רי׳׳ט, שנעשה להרבות שמחה ביניהם. וכ״ב בקובץ כרם שלמה גליון תשרי תשמ״ג עמוד ה׳ מהגה״ק רבי משה מראזוודוב זצ״ל, עפ׳׳י סוד טעם למנהגן של ישראל לעשות דגלים שנודע דג׳ רגלים פסח שבועות וסוכות, אינון חסד גבורה תפארת ג׳ דגלי המרכבה, וחג הזה הוא דגל רביעי שבמרכבה, ...


5

This song was on Pirchei volume 2 - Aleicha Hashem is the tape title. Here is a link where you can request to hear the song. This tape was produced by Rabbi Eli Teitelbaum Zatzal in 5731/1971. The choir director was Eli Lipsker. The soloist on the song was Yechiel Moskovitz. There is no mention of the composer of the songs, and per my e-mail communication ...


5

The Baal HaTanya writes in his siddur: מנהג ותיקין הוא לעשות יום שמיני עצרת גם כן כמו בשמחת תורה It is a custom of the ancients(?) to do on Shmini Atzeres like on Simchas on Torah ... And then going on to describe Hakafos. Rabbi Nachum Greenwald notes that the language seems to paraphrase the Mishnas Chassidim, but the Mishnas Chassidim is talking about ...


4

Your question is addressed by the Remo in סימן תרסט - סדר יום שמחת תורה, though he doesn't explain the rationale behind it. וְנָהֲגוּ עוֹד לְהַרְבּוֹת הַקְּרוּאִים לַסֵּפֶר תּוֹרָה, וְקוֹרִים פָּרָשָׁה אַחַת הַרְבֵּה פְּעָמִים וְאֵין אִסּוּר בַּדָּבָר (מִנְהָגִים וריב''ש סִימָן פ''ד). ‏ "The custom is to call up lots of people to the Torah [on ...


4

R. Nachum Rabinovitch (Siach Nachum, no. 40) addresses this question. Assuming that the congregation and the rabbi do not object, he says there is no halakhic problem with this, as long as the sefer Torah is treated with the respect due to it (from both men and women). However, it is also forbidden to cause machloket, such that if this will do so it would be ...


4

See here that פּולווער is gunpowder and here and here that it was common in some communities to light firecrackers on Simchat Torah.


4

Yalqut Yosef states (in Se'if 5) that Simhhat Torah was not part of the Rabbinic decree (of not clapping/dancing) to safeguard against fixing tools. He states that, out of honor for the Torah, HaZa"L did not include Simhhat Torah celebrations in the decree.


4

One answer is that it is juxtaposed with the giving of the Torah - but the giving of the second Tablets on Yom Kippur, not the first tablets on Shavuos. This is explained at length in several places in Chabad Chassidus. One of them is here. The Meshech Chochma says that on Shmini Atzers Zos HaBracha was read anyway. The Talmud which describes reading Zos ...


4

It's another 7 hakafot, but this time with live music. At the ones i've been to, they do the standard hakafah opening verses (with Hashem's name -- it's just reciting psukim, at least in the Sfardi version), and then sing and dance with music. It's not much more complicated than that. I don't know where exactly the custom comes from, but it may just be to ...


3

See p. 180 in this book. Hakafot on SImchat Torah was a relatively late addition done in the 16th century. One of the reasons mentioned in the source is that it is actually a supplication and extension of the prayer for rain. That is why we say Ana Hashem Hoshi'ah Na. Reason #2 on that page notes that the Hakafot use one of the last phrases in Halel. I am ...


3

Nitei Gavriel Succos 102:6:9 brings from Pri Tzaddik volume 5 - Rabbi Tzadok HaKohain - 44 that the source of drinking on Simchas Torah is King Solomon and goes on to say it is a Tikun for the original sin of Adam & Chava.


3

Yeshivas Chaim Berlin, as litvisha yeshiva on Coney Island Ave. in Brooklyn, does hskafos on Shmini Atzeres at night. They come back to the yeshiva after eating the seudah and the Rosh Yeshiva speaks (gives a maimar) in the sukkah. Afterwards they go inside and dance hakafos. The hakofos usually do no start until 2-3 AM.


3

In certain communities (like the Addas Yeshurun in Johannesburg; a Yekkishe minyan) only the Chazzan and those honored to carry the Sifrei Torah walk around the Bima on Simchas Torah. The only others moving around are the kids who are collecting candy in bags or buckets. The rest of the community remains in their seats; singing and handing out candy to the ...


3

R. Asher Ben Yechiel cites the Jerusalem Talmud as the source for reading the beginning of Yehoshua as the haftarah: Rosh Megillah 4:10 ביו"ט אחרון של חג קורין כל הבכור ומפטירין ויהי ככלות שלמה ולמחר קורא וזאת הברכה ומפטירין ויעמוד שלמה לפני ה' וי"א ויהי אחרי מות משה עבד ה' והכי איתא בירושלמי והכי נהגינן This is codified by his son R. Yaakov Ben ...


3

According to this site, the Machzor Vitry (12th century) was the earliest source to mention hakafos -albeit in the morning, and the Maharam M'Rutenberg (13th century) was the first to record hakafos being done at night.


2

"What is the source and when did it start?" The questioner makes two "given"s. I propose there is no source. I cannot answer as to when it started (or a better word would be "begin to evolve). As to the issurim involved, I can propose some similar activity that is not assur per se, yet I will leave that to your imagination. Point being, that this may have ...


2

1. whether, after the nighttime hakafos and before the reading of the Torah, the congregation says "B'rich shmeh"; The לוח דבר בעתו on page 242 (תשע"א) says: Yes. 2. Same question for daytime; The לוח דבר בעתו says: Yes. 3. whether, after the nighttime hakafos and before the reading of the Torah, the leader/congregation says "Sh'ma", "Echad Elokenu", ...


2

See Mishna Berura 669 sk 11: ...ולכן יש להתאמץ בזה לרקד ולזמר לכבוד התורה כמו שכתוב גבי דהע"ה מפזז ומכרכר בכל עוז לפני ד' וכ"כ משם האר"י ז"ל והעידו על האר"י ז"ל שאמר שהמעלה העליונה שהשיג באה לו ע"י שהיה משמח בכל עוז בשמחה של מצוה וגם על הגר"א ז"ל כתבו שהיה מרקד לפני הס"ת בכל כחו: ... ‏ The Mishna Berura mentioned a couple of responsa ...


2

It looks like the original reading of V'Zot Habracha fluctuated in time based on the 3-year Torah reading cycle. As the Bavli custom of finishing the Torah every year took hold, the reading of the final portion became fixed to Shmini Atzeret. Here is how I understand the historical development Originally in Israel, the Torah was completed every 3 years, so ...


2

Strictly speaking the Torah should be read only in the daytime. But since the scrolls have already been removed from the Ark for the processions, some argue that there ought to be a reading so that the Torahs have not been taken out in vain. The Rema says in his glosses to the Shulchan Aruch, “Each place follows its own custom”. Where the reading does take ...


2

Everything done in a Beit Kenesset is modeled on the procedures as they were done in the Temple, "HaMikdash", in Jerusalem. That is why a synagogue is known as "Mikdash Me'at", a small Temple (Yechezkel 11:16, Megillah 29a in the name of Rabbi Yitzchok). In the Temple, when the first Kohen would enter in the morning to unlock the doors, they would turn to ...


2

Nitei Gavriel writes that when the Chazzan holds the Sefer Torah, the minhag is to add in the word ונורא to אחד אלהינו, just as one does on Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. He then quotes sources that write that the Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur tune is used to call people up. The Minhag to lein in this tune may have developed from this.


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