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Some old non-allegorical commentaries on Shir HaShirim: Rashbam's commentary (translation) separates the allegorical and non-allegorical comments. R' Avraham ibn Ezra wrote his commentary in three levels: one lexical, one non-allegorical, and one allegorical. There are two anonymous commentaries here given under the headings פירוש מחכמי צרפת that are non-...


5

Yes that's the official layout structure when formally writing a scroll. See Masekhet Sofrim 13:1. Haazinu, Tehillim, Mishlei, most of Iyov, and the Song of David in Samuel are written in a split pattern according to the will of the scribe. A good scribe makes the splits at breaks in the flow of the content. For Haazinu specifically there is an old ...


5

From searching I was able to find the source in the commentary Ote Or on Shir Hashirim by Rabbi Yechiel Heller. In his introduction he says, based on Zohar Shemot 143a and Shir Hashirim Rabba to 1:1, that the song was said on the day that Solomon brought the ark into the Holy of Holies. According to Yoma 54a, the cherubs were male and female and represent ...


4

Malbim says there are two stories going on here; King Solomon took a young shepherd girl to his palace, but she kept fleeing back to her shepherd-boy lover, despite all the treasures the palace had to offer. This is an allegory for the soul trying to reach G-d. But still, it's a fascinating allegory. Rabbi Mordechai Gifter z'l is quoted as saying the ...


4

My understanding has always been that argaman refers to Tyrian Purple, or at least a similar reddish-purplish dye, produced from murex shells. The archaeologist Zvi Koren has written about this and has found a fabric at Qumran of murex-dyed wool that he interprets as having been Tyrian purple. With regards to the hair: some scholars have suggested (and I ...


4

Malbim's commentary consists of two columns: a nuanced non-allegorical commentary (a shepherd girl who's been snatched away from her lover and told to live an a palace), and an allegorical interpretation (the soul keeps trying to reach back to God). You could just read the first column.


4

Ibn Ezra (in his First Time, where he discusses the literal definitions), Isaiah di Trani, and Saadiah Gaon say that a Shulamit is someone from Shalem, which is Jerusalem. Rashbam takes it to be from the root של״מ, meaning whole, perfect, and so translates "the perfect one". H. J. Mathews' Unknown Commentary on the Song of Songs says that Shulamit means ...


4

Nitei Gavriel Pesach 2 Chapter 105:6:7 brings it in the name of the Shela 170:1 which bases this Minhag on Mesechtas Sofrim 14:18.


4

As Fred pointed out, marrying a princess of Nation X was a form of diplomacy with Nation X. (And when all those princesses had their own houses with their own modes of worship, well, think embassies.) As he established peace and trade with lots and lots of other nations, well it may not have been good for personal happiness, but it served the national good. ...


3

Rav Yehuda Leib Maimon discusses this question here. The earliest explicit source he finds is in Chemdas Yamim (he acknowledges the controversy around this sefer but indicates his defense of the work), who simultaneously mentions a "wide spread" custom to use musical instruments for Kabbalas Shabbos. He finds no corroboration for the latter custom, but ...


3

The way it is set up, I think we need to read Rashi in the passuk beforehand to understand. There the praise is שערך כעדר העזים, Rashi says this is referring to the young and weak. Makes sense. Hair is soft and flexible. The next passuk is praising the teeth. Rashi says this is referring to the powerful and strong. Again makes sense. Teeth are hard. I don'...


3

It's possible that Magen Avraham got this from Kol Bo. See footnote 57 on p. 15 here as well as Kol Bo section 52 here, right column a few lines from the bottom. Kol Bo states that it was customary for people to put saffron in their matzot because it makes people happy. Kol Bo doesn't explain the custom any further nor why specifically saffron. I'm ...


3

Because they're lovers. And lovers can and should do all sorts of ervah-related things in private that don't belong in public. (That verse is actually the Talmud's prooftext.)


3

Taken from R Aryeh Kaplan's translation of the Torah dark red (Ibn Ezra; Ibn Janach; Pesikta Rabathai 20:3, 86a). Argaman in Hebrew. Others state that it is similar to lake, a purplish red dye extracted from lac (Radak, Sherashim; Rambam on Kelayim 9:1; cf.Yad, Kley HaMikdash 8:13). Although the Septuagint translates argaman as porphura or porphoreus, ...


3

These Pesukim start with the letters יעקב. This is generally said by Sephardic people (not sure about Ashkenazim/Temanim) who didn't have time to say Shir HaShirim, but Moroccans seem to always say it. The Avodat hashem Sephardic Siddur contains this passage and an explanation. The Pe'er Yisrael Moroccan Siddur also has this passage. AFAIK, no online siddur ...


3

I have trouble answering the question as posed because it asks about which communities "have the סימן יתק״ק." This mnemonic is included in some Bibles (both mss and printed editions) not because of communal tradition but because of the judgement of the scribes or editors. This being the case, let me rephrase the question somewhat: Is the common Sephardic ...


3

In light of the recent death of biblical scholar Amos Hakham, A recent blog posted an English translation of Hakham's Introduction to the commentary of the Da’at Mikra volume of Song of Songs (published by Mossad HaRav Kook, translated here by David S. Zinberg). In the introduction, Hakham discusses the various traditional positions of interpreting the ...


2

The Jewish Encyclopedia (1901-1906) says:'The literal interpretation of the poem as simply a eulogy of married love had its representatives in early times (Theodore of Mopsuestia, and, to some extent, Abraham ibn Ezra*), and, in the renaissance of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, was maintained by Grotius, Clericus, and others; but it is only in the ...


2

I wrote an essay about the different words for the moon. What comes out is that basically ירח focuses on the orbital path which the moon takes in travelling the solar system, while לבנה focuses on the moon’s color, and a third word סהר focuses on its shape. See What's in a Word?, "My Three Suns (and Moons)" All three instances to which you refer that the ...


2

The Greek term for Argaman seems to be porphyra, and this color was used to describe a variety of shades. see http://community.middlebury.edu/~harris/Classics/purple.html. (Note his comment on comparing the color to the sea, "eino ke'ein hayam") Argaman was probably used in the same way, referring as much to a hue or iridescence as to a specific color.


2

Devar Yerushalayim says that Shulamis is the Jewish nation which is complete in its faith of Hashem.


2

Meor L'Afeila - Rabbeinu Nesanel ben Yeshaya Parshas Teruma says that it is a light red color. וארגמן הוא הצבע האדום הממוזג בצהיבות Mechon HaMikdash also seems to translate it as some sort of red.


2

The relative pronoun -שֶׁ occurs in Deborah’s Song, in the story of Gideon, and in the Israelite sections of the Book of Kings. Consequently, the form -שֶׁ probably replaced אֲשֶׁר in Hebrew dialects of North Israel. The form became standard in Late Biblical Hebrew and Rabbinic Hebrew. See Blau's Phonology and Morphology of Biblical Hebrew, pg. 183.


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Shir hashirim is in the form of God speaking to his lover/wife Israel. Even if voices are ervahs for you and me, the husband is obviously permitted to his wife's voice and see her real hair and other things.


1

Both this Midrash and another Midrash here ודגלו עלי אהבה - א"ר אתא, עם הארץ שקורא לאהבה איבה, כגון ואהבת - ואייבת, אומר הקב"ה ודלוגו עלי אהבה: are interpreted by some Poskim (see Tur/BY OC 142) to be referring to Kerias Hatorah, and they mean that people who mispronounce these names or words do not need to be corrected. These Midrashim are examples of ...


1

The source of Rambam is in Shvuot 35:2, start with the words "כל שלמה האמורין בשה"ש קדש". There are some exception that are brought to this rule. But according to one of the opinions the Shelomoh that you brought refers to God, and division of money is number of people that a King may kill. אמר שמואל מלכותא דקטלא חד משיתא בעלמא לא מיענשא ...


1

The Rambam in Hilchos Kli Mikdash 8:13 writes that it was red,the Raavad said it was two or three dyes mixed together . וכל מקום שנאמר בתורה שש או בד הוא הפשתים והוא הבוץ. ותכלת האמורה בכל מקום היא הצמר הצבוע כעצם שמים שהוא פתוך מן הכוחל. הארגמן הוא הצמר. הצבוע אדום. ותולעת השני הוא הצמר הצבוע בתולעת: השגות הראבד הארגמן הוא הצמר. א"א לי נראה ארגמן ארוג ...


1

I've learned that it is crimson red. While some people have quite reddish hair, I do not think natural crimson hair exists.


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