15

When I was at KBY, I asked the campus Posek this question, and he said that it's OK, because the bentcher is protected by at least two layers of covering ("kli betoch kli"). He added that it may even be OK in a pants pocket without the wallet, since the fabric of the pocket and the fabric of the pants could constitute two layers.


12

The ultimate source is Shabbos 10b, citing Judg. 6:24, ויקרא לו ה' שלום. For certain purposes it is indeed treated like a bona fide name of Hashem; thus, the Gemara there says (and this is cited as halachah in Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 84:1)) that one may not greet another in the bathhouse with the word "Shalom," just as one may not recite blessings or ...


12

The Talmud (in Masekhet Shabbat 120b) directly discusses this issue: דתניא: הרי שהיה שם כתוב לו על בשרו - הרי זה לא ירחוץ ולא יסוך ולא יעמוד במקום הטינופת. נזדמנה לו טבילה של מצוה - כורך עליה גמי ויורד וטובל. רבי יוסי אומר: לעולם יורד וטובל כדרכו, ובלבד שלא ישפשף As it was taught in a baraita: If one had a sacred name of God written on his skin he ...


12

UPDATE: Shalom pointed to the article "Medical and Cosmetic Tattooing" by J. David Bleich (Tradition 42:4), in which a pseudo-Kabbalist directed a woman to get a tattoo containing the Divine Name. The question of removing it was brought to Sephardic Chief Rabbi Eliyahu Bakshi-Doron and printed in Or ha-Torah Shevat 5762. R. Bleich's summarizes R. Bakshi-...


12

My father, who works at Columbia received a psak that the University branded calendars and such require geniza because of the logo on the cover. Presumably this would imply it is forbidden to walk on the Name on the library floor. Source: Rabbi Dovid Goldwasser PS I've now identified myself to anyone who knows me already.


12

The Chavos Yair Siman 16 at the end of the tshuva writes that the coins from Sweden which had the Shem HaShem on it are not considered kodesh since it was made for mundane purposes and the *Mishna Brurah 334:52 quotes this opinion concerning melting down the coin(erasing the name). It seems that the name on the seal has no kedusha just the fact its on the ...


12

R. Moshe Feinstein has a responsum about writing ב"ה in a letter. While he notes that it could potentially lead to issues because the ה is a letter of God's name and it is also meant to refer to God, he says that it is not a problem to write it in a letter because we don't have to be concerned with the far-off possibility that the letter will be desecrated. ...


11

Judaism 101 writes, Judaism does not prohibit writing the Name of God per se; it prohibits only erasing or defacing a Name of God. However, observant Jews avoid writing any Name of God casually because of the risk that the written Name might later be defaced, obliterated or destroyed accidentally or by one who does not know better. The engraving ...


11

Rav Zilberstein writes in Veha'arev Na (page 441), that sheimos written in Braille require placement in sheimos, as they are read by a wide audience of blind people. Challenge: May divrei Torah written in braille be thrown in the garbage, or do they require genizah like divrei Torah written in normal script? Solution: Since braille is a written ...


10

Excerpt from this The use of words and names like “Shmuel,” “Yeshaya,” and “Daniel” are permitted, even though two of their letters represent Hashem’s name, since the intended use is for a person’s name, not Hashem’s name. The word “Bethel” can be written, as well as Beth-El in two words. Since it is the name of a city, it does not matter how it ...


10

The Babylonian Talmud has both Aramaic and Hebrew in it. In the handwritten versions which I reviewed, the 4 letter name of hashem is replaced with the yod-yod. You can see this in the quotes from the bible used on Tractate B'rachot, 6A. The printed version I have replaces the 4 letter name with the Hey-apostrophe. From the Munich Codex of 1342 http://web....


9

Many people use the number '0' rather than substituting '-' for the letter 'o' (such as in JewishWorldReview.com for its columnists) in order to prevent the various editors from putting the letters g and d on separate lines. When we were writing the soc.culture.jewish FAQ we used the following question. Note: The story below about Rav Soloveitchik was ...


9

The 3rd commandment is not to take a pointless oath in G-d's name (e.g. swearing that a table is a table, and other pointless oaths, see ch 1) as is codified by Rambam (Hilchos Shvuos) and Sefer HaChinuch(30). By swearing pointlessly invoking the name of G-d, one trivializes G-d's significance as the singular force in the Universe. Rambam (Hilchos Berachos ...


9

The Magain Avraham (O.C. 156) quoting the Yam Shel Shlomo says that it is to not say something disgusting (and it should be said in general, not specifically about the Mesechta name). The Teferes Yisroel (beginning of the Meschta) doesn't like that explanation and suggest instead it is to avoid confusing it with the word בצע which caused a mistake in ...


8

chirik - adoni - "my [human] master" patach - adonai - "my [human] masters" komotz - adonoi - "my Lord-of-all-things" = God . Its own special grammatical construction specifically used for the name of God.


8

The Sefer Divre Shalom WeEmet on the Minhagim of North Africa writes that one should sing songs with Hashem's name. For the second part of the question, I heard the Baba Sali said not to repeat Hashem's name over and over but only say it once.


8

Tosfot (Sukkah 5a s.v. Yod) says that saying "Yod - Hey" is ok if the intention is not for the name יה but as a abbreviation of the Tetragrammaton. This implies that they understand that spelling out the letters can be problematic as well.


8

Rabbi Ari Enkin wrote a couple of articles about this explaining why pronouncing these words would not be problematic. In the first, a book review, he writes: There is also an especially interesting chapter on the various names of God, their meanings and their usages. In one such discussion the author vigorously argues that the word “Jehovah” cannot ...


7

A Torah scroll which is written by a heretic should be burned ,like you said. However, if one did not burn it and brought it into the bathroom that's also fine,but once one starts thinking about Torah in the bathroom that becomes a forbidden act (Shulchan Aruch OC 85:2). A Torah written by a heretic is not holy but if it is exactly the same as a kosher ...


7

The names of Hashem which may not be erased are listed in Shulchan Oruch Yoreh Daioh 276 (9). Hashem is not one of them and so the hyphenated ("Hash-m") seems unnecessary.


7

The Talmud discusses Genizoth. I don't recall off-hand the context, but I remember learning a Gemara that said students of great sages in the Tannaic era, when writing Torah SheBe'Al Peh was prohibited, would take notes that they would later commit to memory before placing in Genizah. In addition (or in contrast, perhaps), if a scribe made an uncorrectable ...


7

Rashi himself asks and answers this question! On 32:9, he writes that his purpose is to provide a direct quote of Hashem for the sake of his argument/plea: ואלהי אבי יצחק: ולהלן הוא אומר (לא מב) ופחד יצחק, ועוד מהו שחזר והזכיר שם המיוחד, היה לו לכתוב האומר אלי שוב לארצך וגו'. אלא כך אמר יעקב לפני הקב"ה שתי הבטחות הבטחתני אחת בצאתי מבית אבי מבאר שבע, ...


7

The Gemara in Pesachim 50a brings a verse that Hashem's name is not pronounced the way it is written. ר' אבינא רמי כתיב {שמות ג-טו} "זה שמי לעלם וזה זכרי לדור דור". ‏ אמר הקב''ה: לא כשאני נכתב אני נקרא. נכתב אני ביו''ד ה''א, ונקרא אני באל''ף דל''ת‏ R' Avina taught it to us, based on the verse in Shmot 3:15 that says זֶה שְּׁמִי לְעֹלָם וְזֶה ...


7

Yes, here are screenshots of Windows Character Map showing DBS-Frank, DBS-Keren DBS-Stam, and DBS-Vilna:


7

Still prohibited. The general rule is (Yesodei HaTorah 6:3, YD 276:9) prefixes conjugated to one of God's names are permitted to erase while suffixes are prohibited (without statutory punishment). The root name though is definitely fully prohibited. So derivatives of א-לוה or א-להים like א-להיך א-להינו א-להי א-להיכם are all prohibited (though you couldn't ...


6

I heard from a student of R. Yosef Dov Soloveitchik z"l that whether a translation of God's name into English or another language, has the status of a shem or not, replacing a letter with another symbol e.g. "G-d" accomplishes nothing, because there are no formal laws about the lettering of English as there are with Hebrew (e.g. regarding the laws of ...


6

ברוך שם כבוד מלכותו לעולם ועד The above line was initially uttered by Ya'akov Avinu on his deathbed as a response to the unified proclamation of Shema Yisrael by his sons (Pesachim 56a). In the Temple, when the kohein gadol would pronounce the shem ham'forash, the people would respond by uttering this line (Yoma 66a). The Gemara explains this practice as ...


6

With regard to taking God's name in vain, the Chinuch (Mitzva 30) goes into great detail why it's forbidden, but basically 1) swearing unnecessarily in God's name shows that you have no respect or fear for the Master of the universe (and all the other attributes the Names of God encompass) 2) swearing falsely in God's name is forbidden because God is Emes ...


6

The Kaf Hachaim 5:9 quotes the AriZal and Radvaz who say that spelling out the letters is forbidden as ההוגה את השם.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible