26

http://www.ou.org/torah/tt/5766/miketz66/specialfeatures.htm Rambam (Sh'vuos 12:9) rules that one who uses Hashem's Name in a meaningless oath or a an unwarranted blessing violates the Torah prohibition to use His Name in vain. One who utters His Name without a purpose transgresses the lower level, Torah commandment to fear His Name (ibid.:11).In ...


15

Two possibilities I can think of: The E-ink is not permanent stuff (it disappears as soon as the power is cut, for example). So it might be akin to writing Hashem's name in fruit juice or something similar. In the laws of Shabbos, that is not considered true "writing" (though it's still forbidden Rabbinically - see Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 340:4 and ...


15

When I was at KBY, I asked the campus Posek this question, and he said that it's OK, because the bentcher is protected by at least two layers of covering ("kli betoch kli"). He added that it may even be OK in a pants pocket without the wallet, since the fabric of the pocket and the fabric of the pants could constitute two layers.


14

The Shach (Yoreh De'ah 179:11) ruled that "God" spelled in a foreign language does NOT have the status of a "shem" and thus may be erased, lehatkhila. For more information, you can read this article: Writing: Why do some people write "G-d" with a hyphen instead of an "o"?.


13

In the Torah we see the word Elokim used for both Hashem and other nations Gods (Elohim Acheirim). That proves that a word can have two meanings, and you still may use it. In addition the name Gad does not sound like God at all.


12

י and ה by themselves do form a Divine name, used in several places in the Bible (e.g., Ex. 17:16). All of the laws about not erasing a name of G-d apply to it as well (Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 276:10). As for י and ו, we do find those used as a representation of G-d's name in personal names like יוחנן (Yochanan/Johanan, "G-d is kind") and יוכבד (...


12

In order to answer your question we need to define the scope of the prohibition on erasing G-d's name. It's based on Deuteronomy 12:3-4 וְאִבַּדְתֶּם אֶת־שְׁמָ֔ם, "and you shall destroy [the idols'] names", 'לֹֽא־תַעֲשוּן כֵּ֔ן לַה, "you shall not do the same to G-d". The extent of the prohibition is discussed in commentators to Shulchan Aruch and Tur 276:9, ...


12

The ultimate source is Shabbos 10b, citing Judg. 6:24, ויקרא לו ה' שלום. For certain purposes it is indeed treated like a bona fide name of Hashem; thus, the Gemara there says (and this is cited as halachah in Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 84:1)) that one may not greet another in the bathhouse with the word "Shalom," just as one may not recite blessings or ...


12

The Talmud (in Masekhet Shabbat 120b) directly discusses this issue: דתניא: הרי שהיה שם כתוב לו על בשרו - הרי זה לא ירחוץ ולא יסוך ולא יעמוד במקום הטינופת. נזדמנה לו טבילה של מצוה - כורך עליה גמי ויורד וטובל. רבי יוסי אומר: לעולם יורד וטובל כדרכו, ובלבד שלא ישפשף As it was taught in a baraita: If one had a sacred name of God written on his skin he ...


12

My father, who works at Columbia received a psak that the University branded calendars and such require geniza because of the logo on the cover. Presumably this would imply it is forbidden to walk on the Name on the library floor. Source: Rabbi Dovid Goldwasser PS I've now identified myself to anyone who knows me already.


12

The Chavos Yair Siman 16 at the end of the tshuva writes that the coins from Sweden which had the Shem HaShem on it are not considered kodesh since it was made for mundane purposes and the *Mishna Brurah 334:52 quotes this opinion concerning melting down the coin(erasing the name). It seems that the name on the seal has no kedusha just the fact its on the ...


12

R. Moshe Feinstein has a responsum about writing ב"ה in a letter. While he notes that it could potentially lead to issues because the ה is a letter of God's name and it is also meant to refer to God, he says that it is not a problem to write it in a letter because we don't have to be concerned with the far-off possibility that the letter will be desecrated. ...


11

UPDATE: Shalom pointed to the article "Medical and Cosmetic Tattooing" by J. David Bleich (Tradition 42:4), in which a pseudo-Kabbalist directed a woman to get a tattoo containing the Divine Name. The question of removing it was brought to Sephardic Chief Rabbi Eliyahu Bakshi-Doron and printed in Or ha-Torah Shevat 5762. R. Bleich's summarizes R. Bakshi-...


11

Judaism 101 writes, Judaism does not prohibit writing the Name of God per se; it prohibits only erasing or defacing a Name of God. However, observant Jews avoid writing any Name of God casually because of the risk that the written Name might later be defaced, obliterated or destroyed accidentally or by one who does not know better. The engraving ...


11

Rav Zilberstein writes in Veha'arev Na (page 441), that sheimos written in Braille require placement in sheimos, as they are read by a wide audience of blind people. Challenge: May divrei Torah written in braille be thrown in the garbage, or do they require genizah like divrei Torah written in normal script? Solution: Since braille is a written ...


10

I asked a Posek from YU and he said it shouldn't be a problem to read seforim on an E-reader. He didn't explain why, but these are two reasons that one can perhaps be meikel: Its not really a written text. Since its just particles floating in some sort of liquid, one can make an argument that it is not a real written word. Even though the text doesn't need ...


10

Yalkut Yosef vol. 3 pg 548-549: הלומד בש''ס ובמדרשי חז''ל, ופוגע בפסוקים שיש בהם אזכרות שם שמים, יש לו לקראם כקריאתן בתנ''ך בהזכרת שם שמים, ואין להחמיר בזה ולכנות ולבטאת ''אלוקים'' בקו''ף ולא בה''א, או לומר ''אדושם'', או ''המוני'', שהואיל ומדינא שרי, המחמיר יוצא שכרו בהפסדו, דהוי כמכנה שם כלפי מעלה. אולם אזכרות שבמטבע ברכות המובאים בש''ס ובמדרשי חז''ל ...


10

Orach Chaim 91:3 - The Beis Yosef says that Yesh Omrim that you are not allowed to say Hashem's name with your head uncovered.


10

There some times where (according to kabala or something) one should have a certain vowelization of the name in mind (while still saying "Adonay" of course). You'll sometimes see the name with four tzeres or with four sh'vas or the like then. I know nothing more about this than I've just written. Otherwise, the vowelization seems to be to point to its ...


10

Excerpt from this The use of words and names like “Shmuel,” “Yeshaya,” and “Daniel” are permitted, even though two of their letters represent Hashem’s name, since the intended use is for a person’s name, not Hashem’s name. The word “Bethel” can be written, as well as Beth-El in two words. Since it is the name of a city, it does not matter how it ...


9

In this week's Torah portion, both Par'oh (in Exodus 10:16) and his servants (in Exodus 10:7) use God's name explicitly. I don't think this proves it is permissible, but it does seem to imply that it's ok. Additionally, gentiles use God's name in Joshua 2:9, Joshua 9:9, Samuel I 6:8 and Samuel II 24:23 to give some examples that are Post-Sinai.


9

Many people use the number '0' rather than substituting '-' for the letter 'o' (such as in JewishWorldReview.com for its columnists) in order to prevent the various editors from putting the letters g and d on separate lines. When we were writing the soc.culture.jewish FAQ we used the following question. Note: The story below about Rav Soloveitchik was ...


9

The 3rd commandment is not to take a pointless oath in G-d's name (e.g. swearing that a table is a table, and other pointless oaths, see ch 1) as is codified by Rambam (Hilchos Shvuos) and Sefer HaChinuch(30). By swearing pointlessly invoking the name of G-d, one trivializes G-d's significance as the singular force in the Universe. Rambam (Hilchos Berachos ...


9

The Magain Avraham (O.C. 156) quoting the Yam Shel Shlomo says that it is to not say something disgusting (and it should be said in general, not specifically about the Mesechta name). The Teferes Yisroel (beginning of the Meschta) doesn't like that explanation and suggest instead it is to avoid confusing it with the word בצע which caused a mistake in ...


8

This is a matter of the English language. I found this site which goes through some of the 'rules'. http://www.teachingcollegeenglish.com/2004/02/04/capitalizing-god/ In essennce, a capital first letter implies a 'proper noun', it also implies a bit of 'the one and only'. Capitalizing the word 'He' means 'that "He" which we all know, the one and only.. ...


8

The Sefer Divre Shalom WeEmet on the Minhagim of North Africa writes that one should sing songs with Hashem's name. For the second part of the question, I heard the Baba Sali said not to repeat Hashem's name over and over but only say it once.


8

There is a dispute about it (in connection with writing a Sefer Torah, whether the sofer should declare it holy or not). R. Elazar Fleckeles (Meleches Hakodesh, Lech Lecha 1) suggests that this depends on an earlier machlokes, recorded in the Yerushalmi (Megillah 1:9) and Maseches Sofrim (5:10), as to whether the name should be written closed-up (ביתאל) or ...


8

Tosfot (Sukkah 5a s.v. Yod) says that saying "Yod - Hey" is ok if the intention is not for the name יה but as a abbreviation of the Tetragrammaton. This implies that they understand that spelling out the letters can be problematic as well.


7

R. Schneur Zalman of Liadi (in Tanya, Shaar Hayichud Vehaemunah ch. 4) explains that the name Elokim "shields" the name Havayah, and makes it possible for finite and (seemingly) independent creatures to exist in the first place. Thus, Elokim represents (and is the source of) the tzimtzum, the "contraction" of Divine energy that made "room" for the various ...


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