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According to this website, the custom in the Jewish Tunisian community is to recite the "Eishet Chayil", after the reading of "Shir Hashirim" (Song of Songs) and in the Djerba community to recite it during the weeks of Sefirat HaOmer. [In many Sefardic communities, "Shir Hashirim" is recited weekly, after "Kabbalat Shabbat", before "Arvit". Some of the ...


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The pamphlet makes a great case but it overstates it a bit. Yabia Omer 9:10 speaks for itself. Initially Rav Ovadia believed it was asur but seeing that the minhag of tremendous segments of klal yisrael including the most religious (see there for examples such as the Or Letzion and students in Radin) he was compelled to write his teshuva. He is adamantly ...


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Here's a link to my "Celebrating the Exodus from Egypt in Egypt". (I am adding the text on request in case the link dies. My father was Sephardic and my mother was Mizrahi, so we were in both worlds.) http://www.hsje.org/mystory/maurice_m_mizrahi/CelebratingExodus2.html I was born and raised in Egypt during just about the worst period to be a Jew in Egypt....


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I'm not from the S&P tradition, but Judeo-Spanish. I figured I contribute nevertheless. From the top of my head: -) Introductory song: The sections of the haggadah are sung in a nice song, i.e."Kadesh urhats, karpas, yahats..." -) Ladino: The second night of the seder, the maggid is read in ladino. On both nights, the introductions of each "section" of ...


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There are no actual difference when it comes to hilchos tznius between Ashkenazim and Sefardim, there is just a difference of opinions in both "groups" and you have both sides of the opinion in both groups. For example, some Sefardi gedolim say wigs are mutar and others say that they're asur. Rav Ovadia Yosef, zt"l, was very against wigs and Rav Meir Mazuz, ...


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Sepharadim are lenient to sit for Kaddish in general. However, on Leil Shabbat the Mekubalim have a chumra to stand for Barechu and, by extension, Kaddish. The Ruach of Kedushat Shabbat is accepted with Barechu, so one should stand to accept it. Once one is already standing for Barechu, the Minhag developed to stand for Kaddish as well. Ben Ish Chai Shannah ...


3

Here is an advertisement video from YouTube, where they show in detail the tik. As you can see there, the poles are attached to the box and can rotate. The scroll is just attached to these poles in the same way as in the Ashkenazi practice. I assume there are standard parchment sizes, but since many of these cases are ornamented and expensive, you can order ...


3

In my opinion, the Adeni nusach is probably most similar to Shamai. In some Adeni shuls they use books similar to the Zechor LeAvraham siddur (Shamai), but many now use their own Sim Shalom siddur (Adeni). To be honest, a lot of Adenim just use Edot HaMizrah siddurim because that's what they're used to. There was an Adeni siddur published a little before ...


3

I finally found a Siddur that fits the bill! It is called Siddur Sim Shalom and is Nusach Aden. It can be found here: https://tablet.otzar.org/he/book/book.php?book=196528&width=0&scroll=0&udid=0


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Egyptians chant Haftarah in Maqam Bayyat or Hoseini. According to Rabbi Mordechai Cohen, the Yerushalmi Haftarah is in maqam Garga.


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I have trouble answering the question as posed because it asks about which communities "have the סימן יתק״ק." This mnemonic is included in some Bibles (both mss and printed editions) not because of communal tradition but because of the judgement of the scribes or editors. This being the case, let me rephrase the question somewhat: Is the common Sephardic ...


2

Alei Hadas pg 310 (where Rav Mazuz says to look about why the custom exists in the YKR question linked to by @IsraelReader) surmises that some communities recite it in shul because some people won't say it at home or to buy time for latecomers. Either way, the one on the wall is probably just a means of getting another donation for the shul and of little ...


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If one is already standing (for instance, for Barechu), it is forbidden to sit down for the subsequent Kaddish. One may sit for Kaddish -- according to Sephardic practice -- only if one was already seated. Source: Ben Ish Hai, Vayehi 8: ספר בן איש חי - הלכות שנה ראשונה - פרשת ויחי [ח] קדיש שתפסו מעומד, כגון קדיש שאחר העמידה ואחר ההלל, שהיה עומד בתחילתו, ...


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This wrapping is in accordance with the Yemenite(Teiman) custom. Source: Nitei Gavriel Halachos V'Halichos Bar Mitzvah V'Hanachos Tefillin.


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Moreinu Rav Eliyahu Ben-Haim (Rosh Av Beth Din Queens and Rosh Yeshiva at YU) strongly holds of the Techeles, and he himself wears on his Tallit Kattan and Gadol. On YUTorah you can hear many of his comments in regard to the wearing of the Techeles.


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Yes. Aveilus obligates the mourner, not the deceased. The nature of the deceased is irrelevant; the mourner would follow his mesorah on any differences between Sephardic or Ashkenazic customs.


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For Shacharit The Mitzva is to say Kriat Shema just before sunrise so that the Amida is recited at Netz hachama - when the sun rises, see Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 58,1: מצוה מן המובחר לקרות קריאת שמע כוותיקין (פירוש תלמידים. ורש"י פירש אנשים ענוים ומחבבים המצות) שהיו מכוונים לקרותה מעט קודם הנץ החמה (פירוש יציאת החמה כמו הנצו הרמונים) כדי שיסיים קריאת ...


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Here is a wonderful piece on the general topic of standing or sitting during Kaddish, it is well organized and inclusive of the pro, anti and parve shitos and he points out the issues with the Rama in Darkhai Moshe to the Tur(OH 56,3) namely a) it is not in the Mordechai he quotes; b) it is not in the Yerushalmi he brings down; c) the passuk quoted is not in ...


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There are mishnayot on hebrewbooks.org vowelized and printed in Italy by a Sefaradi Menaked. I found three sedarim only: Seder Zerayim (Venezia) Seder Kodshim (Mantova) Seder Taharot (Mantova)


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