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22

Among the classical Torah commentators, there are those that interpret that whole Garden of Eden story as being literal historical fact, while others interpret it allegorically. The main authority who treats it as allegory is Rambam in Moreh Nevuchim (Volume 2, Chapter 30), and according to his interpretation, the snake represents a person's "appetitive ...


15

The Lubavitcher Rebbe said a sicha on this topic, and I really recommend reading it in full. Abridged and translated here. Original and unedited here. Worked-up version by the Rebbe here. In summary, Rashi explains the concept of "confounding Satan" as follows: "So that he will not accuse; for when he hears how the Jewish people love the mitzvos, his ...


12

It is said in the name of Rabbi Akiva Eiger as follows: The Talmud states that if one repents due to fear of punishment, his sins are converted to unintentional sins. However, if one repents out of love, his sins are converted to Mitzvoth (good deeds). Rashi states that the extra shofar blasts show the love Jews have for Mitzvoth, this implies that their ...


9

Satan in Judaism is a very different beast than satan in popular culture (pun intended) The snake in the garden of Eden is identified as the personification of the "Yetzerh Harah" (Bad/evil will/desires/inclination) by the midrashim. The Talmud also states that the Yetzer Harah, Satan, and the angel of death are one. (Some might understand this to mean ...


7

I remember reading a drasha by Rabbi Chaim Smulevitz who gave an answer why we blow the shofar multiple times on Rosh Hashanah. He said at the first blast the Satan prepares his arguments for the Day of Judgement. When he hears the second blast he assumes that Moshiach has now come and this agitates him so much he cannot deliver his accusations. Is the ...


6

In Bava Basra 16a it says that Satan is the yetzer hara. According to Sukah 52a, the yetzer hara will be slaughtered in the future.


6

You are using the term "satan" as if it is a being with independent thoughts, desires, and will. This is a mistake. It is actually "the accuser" or the "yeitzer harah". Thus, it can be considered that a person is confronted by all the various situations and problems in the world is confronted by the "Satan". It is the commonly accepted view that "satan" is ...


6

Jews don't believe in eternal hell - hell is time limited to 1 year (or 11 months). But hell is not just a place of punishment, it's a place for a soul to be "cleaned" and prepared for it's next reincarnation. It is said the "fire" of hell is really the feeling of shame a person feels for his actions. So placing Satan in hell would not make any sense in ...


6

The Jewish view is that everything that has been created is under the control of G0d and cannot be considered an independent being in the sense that non-Jewish religions regard "Satan" (as a "rebellious" angel). One of the translations of the word is "prosecutor". Only human beings have free will and the associated "desires" that can cause them to rebel ...


5

In line with the his understanding of the snake as symbolic of the evil inclination (Gen. 3:1), the Sforno interprets the curse of the snake as symbolic of a person's plight in life (as affected by Adam's succumbing to the evil inclination). Sforno Gen. 3:14 ארור אתה מכל. שישיג תאוותיו וצרכיו בצער ובחסרון תענוג יותר מכל שאר בעלי חיים, כאמרם ראית חיה ...


4

The word "satan" in Hebrew is the title of a role, not a personal name. It means the role of prosecutor (as in a court of law) and it is not a name like "Joe." I have searched through a concordance (both hard copy and electronically on the Bar Ilan data base) and I have not found any time when the prosecutor has spoken directly to a Jew (or any human ...


4

"Satan" isn't an individual being opposed to God the way he is in Christianity. "The satan" is a job description; it's basically the angel who will act as prosecuting attorney when you come to be judged, and is the one God sends to test/prove people like Job. You see ha-satan in the midrash; for example, there is one about how when Avraham is on his way to ...


4

Read the Pesukim in context, with an assist from Rashi, and all will become clear. וַיַּרְאֵ֗נִי אֶת־יְהוֹשֻׁ֙עַ֙ הַכֹּהֵ֣ן הַגָּד֔וֹל עֹמֵ֕ד לִפְנֵ֖י מַלְאַ֣ךְ יְהוָ֑ה וְהַשָּׂטָ֛ן עֹמֵ֥ד עַל־יְמִינ֖וֹ לְשִׂטְנֽוֹ׃ And [Hashem] showed me [Zechariah] Yehoshua the Kohen Gadol standing before an angel of Hashem, and the Satan stood on his right to ...


3

Sanhedrin 26b says: א"ר חנן למה נקרא שמה תושיה ... דבר אחר תושיה שניתנה בחשאי מפני השטן With regard to the latter verse, Rabbi Ḥanan says: Why is the Torah called tushiyya? ...Alternatively, tushiyya can be interpreted as an abbreviation: That it was given in secret [shenittena beḥashai]. This was done because of the Satan, lest he claim that the ...


3

Rambam writes in Moreh Nevuchim ("Guide to the Perplexed), 2:45, that the Ketuvim, Writing, which includes the book of Job, that they were written under the inspiration of the holy spirit. (2) The second degree is this: A person feels as if something came upon him, and as if he had received a new power that encourages him to speak. He treats of science, ...


3

Yes, it's true. It's found in Pirke de Rabbi Eliezer (Chapter 13): והיה סמאל שר גדול בשמים, והחיות מארבע כנפים, ושרפים משש כנפים, וסמאל משנים עשר כנפים Sammael was a great prince in heaven. The "Chayot" had four wings, the "Seraphim" had six wings, and "Sammael" had twelve wings.


3

Yes Samael (the Satan) the accuser had 12 wings Yalkut Shimoni Bereishis 3,1: אמרו מלאכי השרת לפני הקב"ה: "מה אדם ותדעהו? אדם להבל דמה"...והיה סמאל שר גדול בשמים, וחיות מארבע כנפים ושרפים משש כנפים וסמאל משתים עשרה.מה עשה סמאל? לקח כת שלו וירד The angels said "whom is man that he should be known? man is futile".. Samael was greatest among those angels, ...


2

'The word 'satan' means 'adversary' and is derived from the verb 'satan' ('to lie in wait'). The word "Satan" is used 24 times in the Tanakh. In Job (1:6 f) and Zec (3:1 f) it has the prefixed definite article. In all cases but one when the article is omitted it is used in a general sense. This one exception is 1Ch 21:1 (compare 2Sa 24:1), where the word is ...


2

Nachum Klafter recently posted an essay on Torah Musings proposing an answer to this question. Read the whole thing, but in summary: He suggests that the Satan here is our own evil inclination, and in particular, our unfortunate tendency to strip meaningful practices of their meaning by practicing them in a rote manner. As we've been blowing shofar for a ...


1

This is the equivalent of the English phrase Don't tempt fate> As a result it could involve any means that would allow the Satan to call for a judgement against you from the heavenly court. This could involve any phrase or sign or action. Since most communication by people is verbal, that is the usual reference. An example of this is that people leave the ...


1

The Ben Ish Chai Letter Aleph says that ודע, כי הנה כל אדם העושה קטטה ומריבה עם אשתו או בניו או משרתיו, ודאי נראה לו שהדין עמו, וראוי לריב על המכשלה שיצאה מתחת ידם בעניני הבית. אך באמת, מי שיש לו מוח בקדקדו, בין יבין שאם יצא איזה מכשול מתחת ידם, איננו נעשה מאתם, ואין זה מעשה ידיהם, אלא הוא מעשה שטן כדי לחרחר ריב ומדון בעת ההיא. ואם השטן עומד כנגד האשה או ...


1

Tl;dr The term is first used in the 11th century, (well before the State of Israel, or Satmar) and becomes more popular through the centuries. It is first used to refer to overtly miraculous acts designed to lead people to sin. Later it is used to refer to non-miracles, or to miracles disguised as non-miracles which bring people to sin. The Talmud refers to ...


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