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10

First of all, meat can be eaten raw (unsalted, unroasted, un-anything, straight from the carcass) after just rinsing it (YD 67:2). Regarding salting, a non-trivial number of rabbinic authorities (even current ones) have allowed using sugar to 'salt' meat when salt was not an option (for availability or medical reasons). See this article for a sampling of ...


10

See OU.org that broiling is an alternative method for Koshering meat. The Torah forbids the consumption of the blood of an animal. The two accepted methods of extracting blood from meat, a process referred to as “koshering”, are either salting or broiling.


9

Salt in and of itself is inherently Kosher. In most consumer and industrial applications, no kosher-sensitive ingredients are added to salt, so it can in fact be used without Kosher certification. "Kosher salt" would actually be more properly named "Koshering salt." What is special about it is that it is coarse grained. This makes it suitable for preparing ...


7

Rabbi Kaganoff quotes the following authorities and their rulings. Minchas Yaakov Responsum #14 at end quoted in Be'er Hataiv 69:8, Pri Megadim Sifsei Daas 69:60 both say that frozen meat may only be broiled. Aruch Hashulchan Yore Deah 69:79, Yad Yehuda 69:59, Yabia Omer 2 Yore Deah 4, Yechave Da'as 6:46 say that deep freezing prevents blood from hardening,...


7

Great question. I myself have had this question and looked it up, and I found the article Why Do We Dip the Challah Bread in Salt? to be very interesting. To sum up what's written there: It's dipped in salt every time bread is eaten, and not only on Shabbos. The reason is that your table is compared to an altar, and since sacrifices brought on the altar ...


5

What else do you put on your salad besides salt water? That's what the word salad means after all! Oh a vinaigrette, you say? Indeed Tosfot (Pesachim 114a) and others (and ruled in the Shulchan Arukh OC 472) mention either salt water or vinegar as reasonable options for dipping. Leket Yosher writes that in his community people should prefer vinegar to salt ...


5

Any meat that was burned on the altar was dipped in salt and then put straight on the fire. It was unrelated to the laws of kashering, as we also put straight blood on the altar! For instance Rambam Laws of Korban Procedures 6:4 כשמנתח אברי העולה, מוליכין את כל הנתחים לכבש, ומולחין אותן שם. ואחר כך מעלין כל האברים לראש המזבח, ומסיר גיד הנשה בראש המזבח, ...


5

Rashi in Menachos 21a ד"ה דם שבישלו says that salting blood is like cooking it, based on the rule of מליח כרותח, that salting is like boiling. The Ran in Avodah Zarah (38b in dapei haRif, ד"ה גרסינן) also seems to contemplate that salting on Shabbos would be considered cooking (arguing with the Ramban). Similarly, the Tzlach (Pesachim 74a ד"ה ואמרתי) says ...


4

The laws of breaking bread are in O Ch 167 and with the exception of starting the cut are no different as mentioned there between Shabbos and weekday. See the same question asked at Ohr Someach. The use of salt is mentioned in Seif 5 where the expression מלח או לפתן ‏ is used לפתן being something eaten with bread. There are situations in which salt may not ...


3

Rabbi Sh'lomo Zalman Auerbach is cited in Sh'miras Shabas K'hilchasah (1979 edition, chapter 11 footnote 6) as saying that cut tomatoes are not included in the category of "foods commonly preserved by salting" nowadays [meaning: in his days] and therefore can be salted (for use the same day). RSZA adds, SSK says, that he would say the same about radishes, ...


3

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן לו - הלכות מליחה writes: סעיף ה': בָּשָׂר שֶׁנִּקְרַשׁ מֵחֲמַת הַקֹּר, צְרִיכִין לְהַשְׁגִּיחַ שֶׁיִּפָֹּשֵר, אֲבָל לֹא יַנִּיחוּהוּ אֵצֶל תַּנוּר שֶׁהֻסָּק. ובִשְׁעַת הַדְּחָק יְכוֹלִין לִשְׁרוֹתוֹ בְּמַיִם פּוֹשְׁרִין (סח סט ובחכמ"א). ‏ One must make sure that meat that froze because of the icy weather (this was ...


2

Something which has actually been skipped is the fact that the water used to wash it and soak it before salting must all be cold. If the meat comes in contact with hot water the halachah is that the blood clots there and leads to halachic problems.


2

since rama in 575 says we do not salt the matza on seder night we need to fulfill the custom of always having salt on the table. al kol karbanecha takriv melach. since the egg represents the korban chagigah this would be the appropriate time.


2

It seems that there are various customs. This article says that the Chaba"d Rebbe's custom was not to dip the matzah in salt. However, note 308 mentions that the Shelah cites that the Ari z"l's custom was to dip the matzah in salt.


2

I found it. It's an Ibn Ezra in Shemot 8:22. ולפי דעתי כי אנשי מצרים בימי משה היו על דעת אנשי לנדיא''ה שהם יותר מחצי העולם וכלם הם בני חם ואינם אוכלים בשר עד היום. גם דם וחלב ודג ובצים. Meaning that the Egyptians didn't eat any meat, milk, fish, or eggs. Doesn't mention salt, but the Minhage Yeshurun didn't imply the Ibn Ezra mentioned anything about salt....


1

Levush 583:2: .ומנהג אשכנז מטבילין פרוסת הבציעה בדבש The custom in Ashkenaz is to dip the piece of bread into honey. Note that he makes no mention of dipping into salt in addition to the honey. Magen Avraham 583:1 and Mishnah Berurah 583:3 also quote this custom of dipping the bread into honey, and don't say anything about salt. [As noted by ...


1

There is no prohibition about having salt on the table during seder according to the minhag of Chabad. This follows what the Rebbe writes in the Haggadah on page 38 beginning with the words: ויאכלם. ואינו טובל במלח In the later editions of the haggadah it mentions that the explanation for this is based upon the Chassidic discourse from the Alter Rebbe ...


1

Meat that is grilled directly on a fire does not need to be soaked and salted. This is particularly useful information for those with restrictions on salt intake as they can still eat meat without worrying about the salt.


1

Sefer Hatodaa page 98 mentions that there are those that do so and those that do not. My families Minhag, which I have never seen or heard of elsewhere is to make egg soup. This is done by mashing the yellow part of the egg into hot water. Then cutting up the white part of the egg into small pieces, adding scallions, black pepper and salt. This is done ...


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