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5

Regarding the first question, if the convicted should attempt to run, there are two cases - first if the convicted is guilty, and second if the convicted knows himself to be innocent. The Minchas Elazar in a teshuva (1:18) writes that if the convicted is guilty, then he has a responsibility to allow the judgement to be carried out, as this is his only way ...


3

This scenario - where the two witnesses are trying to cause the death of the defendant, but they will not be the ones to actually commit the murder - directly correlates with the discussion posed by R' Chaim Ozer Grodzinski (Achiezer Chelek 3, Siman 19), who discusses the law of a רודף בגרמא. The Or Sameach (Rotzeach, 1.9) writes definitively that one may ...


3

I have zero comment as to today's politics. And when in comes to broader policies, there are many different concerns at play. I can refer you to likely the closest source material, though; assuming individual criminals and civilian life: Suppose a criminal is chasing after you with a gun saying you looked at me funny, I'm going to kill you!, and suddenly by ...


2

dafyomi.co.il on Ketubot 46 was also asked a similar question and they gave several shitos: (NOTE: some overlap with @chortkov2's answer) 1) The Minchas Chinuch (Mitzva 600) writes, "...and all other cases of where the murderer is not given the death penalty such as where he ties the victim in front of a lion, etc. perhaps since the rotzeach cannot be ...


2

If a rodef were to kill the person saving himself he would be liable. There is a big difference between the case of a Rodef and the case of the zealot. In the case of the zealot although it is an Halacha L'Moshe M'Sinai we tell the zealot NOT to do it. Therefore we do not hold the philanderer guilty for saving his own life (Sanhedrin 82a and Rambam Issurey ...


2

I obviously can't give an opinion on how the following would apply to any specific case, but there are sources which talk about the need to provide medicine to patients, even against their own wishes. Magen Avraham and Kaf Hachaim both cite the Radbaz when saying that one can force a patient to take medicine even if the patient doesn't want to. These ...


1

The first question is if giving vaccines to someone who is currently healthy has the halachic status of Pikuach Nefesh and Lo Saamid Al Dam Rayach . While it is possible someone will die and cause others to die as a result of their failure to vaccinate that possibly also exists with driving a car. A serious epidemic would be a situation of pikuach nefesh ...


1

Let's suppose, theoretically, that forcibly vaccinating a patient who doesn't want it is akin to pulling someone out of the way of a speeding car when they intended to get hit; and let's suppose that both are akin to saving someone who was endangered by accident and had no intention of self-harm. (All of those are big ifs.) Even then, there's plenty of ...


1

This question is highly interesting and leads to halachical study about several dinim in Mishna and Gemara. Rodef: Torah allows and commands to kill someone who is about to murder someone else. The rule of rodef applies even if the killer is not responsible for this action (e. g. a child). In certain situation, there is a choice to deliver it to the ...


1

I'm afraid I don't understand how 3) is a question. If anything, it seems to be the answer to 1) and 2). Which is to say: It is human nature for a man to defend his property even at risk of life. The ba bamachteres knows this and still pursues the theft. The assumption is that he would murder the homeowner if confronted. As such, the chidush is that he is ...


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