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Short answer: No! Sources: This is discussed in Keritot 26a ואמר רב תחליפא אבוה דרב הונא משמיה דרבא חייבי מלקיות שעבר עליהן יה"כ חייב פשיטא מאי שנא מחייבי חטאות ואשמות ודאין And Rav Taḥlifa, father of Rav Huna, further says in the name of Rava: Those liable to receive lashes for whom Yom Kippur has passed are liable to receive those lashes after ...


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Perhaps an answer: There is punishment for the sin, which is for the rebellion against G-d. This is immediately shielded by repentance. Then, there is the process of complete atonement, which is more of a refinement or educational processes. This may require suffering to complete. Yet, this suffering is not a punishment. For example, when the Jewish ...


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The sefer LeDofkei BaTeshuva by Rabbi Uri Teegar on Rambam's Hilchos Teshuva 1:1, in Biurim s.v. על לשון כל ישראל (near § 65, it's too far to see for free on Otzar HaChochma) brings the Sefer HaChinuch § 364, who explains the reasons for vidui (verbal confession): (1) expressing one's sins reveals one's thoughts and beliefs, such that it's clear they don't ...


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The sin in not forgiving is refusing to act the way God does. The summary of God’s 13 attributes is that God is merciful. This is why this passage is repeated many times in the Yom Kippur liturgy. The Talmud says: All who act mercifully [that is, forgivingly] toward their fellow creatures will be treated mercifully by Heaven, and all who do not act ...


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Quoting the Rambam again, he actually says something more radical. "כְּשֶׁיַּעֲשֶׂה תְּשׁוּבָה וְיָשׁוּב מֵחֶטְאוֹ חַיָּב לְהִתְוַדּוֹת -- ... when he does teshuvah, he is obligated to confess..." The mitzvah is vidui (the confession), teshuvah is the context in which vidui would be said. There is a dispute among acharonim as to whether the Rambam counts ...


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