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Translation is as follows: במחשכים הושיבני - שאין נוחין זה עם זה ותלמודם ספק בידם He has made me dwell in the dark places - i.e. they are not agreeable,1 this one with that one, and their learning is doubtful in their hands. So he is saying that the learning in Bavel (Babylonia) is not as clear as that of those in Israel as they are always in a state of ...


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Rashi's explanation comes from the Talmud on Sukkah 5b: וּמַאי כְּרוּב אָמַר רַבִּי אֲבָהוּ כְּרָבְיָא שֶׁכֵּן בְּבָבֶל קוֹרִין לְיָנוֹקָא רָבְיָא Apropos the cherubs, the Gemara asks: And what is the form of the face of a cherub [keruv]? Rabbi Abbahu said: Like that of a child [keravya], as in Babylonia one calls a child ravya. While it does seem strange ...


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I dont think its forbidden to believe in something which youve never seen. Even if you were to show me Jewish sources which ascribe supernatural powers to mermaids, it likely wouldnt be an issue of avodah zarah as long as it isnt being worshipped (actively seeking its favor). Furthermore, the fact that it may have been a philistine deity does not mean it ...


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Contrary to popular belief, mermaids do not exist. The Gemara describes dolphins, which Rashi mistook as mermaids or read it that way in Worms. Similarly, what Christopher Columbus and the Spanish explorers thought were mermaids were actually manatees. The Gemara states:[1] Everything copulates front facing back, except for three species that copulate face-...


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