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18

The following is just my understanding of the sources, and if there are any mistakes (ex: in the Ramban's reasons to disagree with the Rambam, the titles given to mitzvos, etc.), please point them out to me. I used the Mishneh LaMelech's Derech Mitzvosecha § 1, this article, and the Ramban's summary at the end of his Hasagos to help with this list. In ...


13

Several rabbinic commentators raised this question without being able to answer it: R. Noach Simcha Faks pointed out this omission and noted that in the Talmudic source-text in Bava Batra 14b, Ezra is enumerated as one of the books: Kovetz He'arot Hatemimim V'an"sh Chag HaSukkot Gilyon Noach p. 66 הנה יש להעיר דמקור דברי הרמב"ם בהל' הנ"ל בגמ' במס' בבא ...


11

Rav Nachum Rabinovitch, שליט"א, in his magnum opus, Yad Peshuta, (Hakdama U'minyan Hamitzvos, Intro to the Division of the Books pp. 187-190) contrasts the Rambam's division of 14 categories of halacha as described in his Moreh Nevukhim, from that in his Yad Hachazaka. As opposed to the in the Moreh where he emphasizes the communal obligation first, the Yad ...


11

Yes, several subsequent Jewish authorities criticized Maimonides, either for his general approach or for specific statements. A few examples: Nachmanides in his commentary to Genesis 18:1 criticizes Maimmonides's non-literal interpretations of certain Biblical incidents: But such words contradict Scripture. It is forbidden to listen to them, all the more ...


10

Rambam discusses this at length in Book II of Guide for the Perplexed. Particularly chapters 4-5 would be informative on this topic. You can read them online in the Friendlander English translation here. Chapter Four in fact opens by noting that you might find it strange at first: THE enunciation that the heavenly sphere is endowed with a soul will appear ...


8

Tosefos to Berachos 44a, s.v. על העץ, cites the ספר המיימוני. ובס' המיימוני מצריך להזכיר בה מעין המאורע בשבת ובי"ט


8

According to a quote from Rav Chaim Kanievsky, there are only 3 places in Shas where Rambam is mentioned in Tosfos (brought down in the stories at the end of the 29th chapter of the Artscroll English Orchos Yosher, Page 400. Including the 2 already mentioned for the sake of completion): 1: Berachos 44a, Dibur Hamaschil על העץ ועל פרי העץ : ובס' המיימוני ...


8

Rambam discusses this exact question in a responsum (1:150 in the Machon Yerushalayim edition) to R. Pinchas the Judge. He tells R. Pinchas to read his Sefer Hamitzvot where he lays out the rule that a mitzvah that is derived via one of the 13 principles of exposition is not called d'oraita unless the Sages explicitly say so. Kessef which is derived via a ...


8

The Taz in CM 262/6 asks your question. He gives two answers: The Rambam is talking about where we know he did not despair, such as when we heard him say something to indicate he thought it was in his house. However, if we don't know if he despaired, such as finding money in the street where we assume people check for their money, then it has nothing to do ...


7

Rambam states explicitly in the first paragraph of his introduction to Sefer Hamitzvot that the Commentary to the Mishnah came first: After having completed our previous well-known work wherein we included a commentary to the whole Mishnah – our goal in that work having been satisfied with the explanation of the substance of each and every Halacha in ...


6

The rabbis didn't contradict Rambam, the rabbis are in Gemara, and Rambam himself report this law. Rambam isure bia 14.2 יד,ב ומודיעין אותו עיקרי הדת, שהוא ייחוד השם ואיסור עבודה זרה; ומאריכין, בדבר זה. ומודיעין אותו מקצת מצוות קלות, ומקצת מצוות חמורות; ואין מאריכין, בדבר זה. ומודיעין אותו עוון לקט שכחה ופיאה, ומעשר עני. ומודיעין אותו עונשן של מצוות.&...


6

The Shulchan Arukh (YD 268:2) rules that someone who wants to convert to Judaism can be taught some of the basic mitzvot. The language there is borrowed directly from the Rambam in his Mishneh Torah (Isurei Biah 14). It seems from the language of the Rambam that the convert should not be taught in great detail, but should be generally informed about the laws:...


5

The miracles of the Exodus were ones the Jews saw or heard. In a way, as if it were a performance and they were the (participating) audience. The miracles were all real things, to be sure. The Jews walked through the Red Sea, drank the water, and ate the manna. People swallowed up by the earth died and stayed dead. All experience of the miracles came ...


5

The Rambam didn't know a successful kidney removal was possible. He was working under the assumption that anyone whose kidney was removed would necessarily die soon. The Rambam's source is Bechorot 7:7, which discusses which blemishes render an animal unfit for eating, but not a person for priestly duties: אלו כשרין באדם, ופסולין בבהמה: אותו ואת בנו, ...


5

This was one of the hottest topics in medieval Jewish philosophy. Saadia Gaon devoted the first treatise of Emunot V'Deiot to proving creatio ex nihilo and refuting the opposing arguments. Here is an excerpt from his introduction to that treatise: Therefore, O thou that seekest the truth, may God be gracious unto thee, if our discussion yield to thee ...


5

Almost everyone will agree that neither extreme is correct. That is to say, that almost no one will interpret every word of the Torah literally, and almost no one will interpret every word of the Torah allegorically. The real question is what the balance is. How do we determine which parts of the Torah should be interpreted literally, and which parts should ...


5

This question was sent by R. Tzvi Hirsh Segal Spitz to R. Yosef Dovid Sinzheim, and is recorded as Question # 5 in Kuntres Sheva Chakiros. R. Spitz began by questioning the order of specific mitzvot but then moved on to say that he could not find any order at all. He then went on and on praising Rambam's masterful writing in all areas, such that it is nigh ...


5

Like Rambam, Ralbag also maintains that this incident did not occur in real life, and he explicitly discusses the view of the Sages: והנה דעת רבותינו ז”ל הוא שזה הענין היה כפשוטו ולזה אמרו שפי האתון הוא מן הדברים שנבראו בין השמשות והנראה בעינינו לפי השורשים האמיתיים הנראים מדברי הנבואה ומן העיון שזה הסיפור היה ענין שקרה לבלעם במראה הנבואה Behold, ...


5

Listing arayot as one of the commandments that one only abstains from because God said so is not Rambam's invention. His statement here is more or less a direct quote from a Midrash Halacha: Sifra 4:9 ר' אלעזר בן עזריה אומר מנין שלא יאמר אדם אי איפשי ללבוש שעטנז אי אפשי לאכול בשר חזיר אי איפשי לבוא על הערוה אבל איפשי מה אעשה ואבי שבשמים גזר עלי כך ת"ל ...


5

See Rabbi Samson Refael Hirsch, in his Nineteen Letters, letter 18. He criticizes the rational approach of Maimonides, but without mentioning him by name: he sought to reconcile Judaism with the difficulties which confronted it from without, instead of developing it creatively from within, for all the good and the evil which bless and afflict the heritage ...


4

There are parts of Genesis prior to Abraham that Rambam does not interpret as allegories. The most explicit example occurs in Guide for the Perplexed 3:50 where he makes it pretty clear that an actual person Adam existed and was created as the first man: It is one of the fundamental principles of the Law that the Universe has been created ex nihilo, ...


4

Indeed, Ralbag in his commentary there rejects the straightforward understanding of this miracle. For such a miracle to occur, nature would be changed in ways surpassing any of the miracles performed even by Moses whom no miracle-performer can actually surpass. In fact, for Hezekiah to even ask for such a miracle would be utterly foolish, which, based on ...


4

The text of Rambam paraphrases a verse in Kohelet 7.16 אַל תְּהִי צַדִּיק הַרְבֵּה וְאַל תִּתְחַכַּם יוֹתֵר לָמָּה תִּשּׁוֹמֵם Metsudat David למה תשומם. למה תעשה כזאת לשבת משומם מבלי בוא מי להתחבר עמך בעבור מרבית הפרישות ותהיה מובדל מן האנשים Why will you stay isolated, and nobody comes to bind with you, because of your excessive deprivation. You ...


4

וְלֹא יִשְׁתּוֹמֵם can mean: To be numb or silent. In this context: He shouldn't sit around idly; it should always look like he's doing something productive. To do strange things that make other people wonder. In this context: He should act normally and not do strange acts. This is basically the Sefaria translation you quote: provided he does not go to ...


4

Yes, idolatrous items contaminate, and things that get mixed with objects of idolatry are forbidden property. However, these are two separate laws. The Rambam has already said that objects of idolatry are forbidden in benefit from the Torah (Hilchot Avodat Kochavim 7:2). Therefore he explains here that once an object of idolatry is mixed with or lost among ...


4

R. Joseph Karo in his commentary to that halacha suggests that based on how Ra'avad is quoted in Sefer HaIkarim the text may not have said "bigger and better than" in the first place: ויש לתמוה על פה קדוש איך יקרא לאומרים שהוא גוף ובעל תמונה גדולים וטובים ממנו ואפשר שעיקר הנוסחא כמו שכתוב בספר העיקרים פ"ב ממ"א וז"ל א"א אע"פ שעיקר האמונה כן הוא המאמין ...


4

Some commentators say that Zerubbabel was supposed to be king (such as Ibn Ezra, see e.g. his commentary to 4:14). Zerubbabel is never explicitly called a king, but he was from the royal family (1 Chronicles 3:19), and also served as governor (פֶּחָה) of Judea (Haggai 1:1). Zerubbabel was the one who built the Temple (he participates in the building in Ezra,...


4

Quoting the Rambam again, he actually says something more radical. "כְּשֶׁיַּעֲשֶׂה תְּשׁוּבָה וְיָשׁוּב מֵחֶטְאוֹ חַיָּב לְהִתְוַדּוֹת -- ... when he does teshuvah, he is obligated to confess..." The mitzvah is vidui (the confession), teshuvah is the context in which vidui would be said. There is a dispute among acharonim as to whether the Rambam counts ...


4

Perhaps an answer: There is punishment for the sin, which is for the rebellion against G-d. This is immediately shielded by repentance. Then, there is the process of complete atonement, which is more of a refinement or educational processes. This may require suffering to complete. Yet, this suffering is not a punishment. For example, when the Jewish ...


3

As @user15464 mentions in the comments, the Rambam defines "porech", or the torture that you quote as being permitted, in Avadim 1:6: ואיזו היא עבודת פרך זו עבודה שאין לה קצבה ועבודה שאינו צריך לה אלא תהיה מחשבתו להעבידו בלבד שלא יבטל What is "porech" labor? Labor that has no limit, or labor that is unnecessary and is asked of the servant with the ...


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