19

You have restricted your understanding of “neighbour” to the author of the paper. If, however, you considered the neighbour to be the other possible readers of the paper (of whom there are of course many more than the author), then those neighbours would rather have your best judgement of the importance of the paper. To test this hypothesis, consider ...


14

I wrote to Hotzaat Shabsi Frankel with this inquiry, and they responded that the unusual numbering is due to a misguided guess at how many volumes the set would ultimately be: Thanks for your inquiry. Yes, it is because of the order in which it was published, and the expectations of how many volumes we would end up with. At the end there were more volumes ...


13

This microfilm copy of the New York Times special millennium edition (dated January 1, 2100, actually published January 1, 2000) shows the Shabbat candle lighting times entry that you refer to. It is found in the lower left corner. The actual text of it says: JEWISH WOMEN/GIRLS LIGHT SHABBAT candles today 18 minutes before sunset In New York 4:39 ...


12

There's a significant amount of literature on this which I'm not going to look up right now, so please excuse the lack of sources; I'll try to edit them in later (they were all found by following the footnotes to introductions to the Mosad Harav Kook editions of the relevant mesechtos, even though the most thorough introduction I believe is that on Eiruvin ...


12

I have a (paper) book called אמרי מדריך that seems to be what you're looking for. It highlights the shoresh, showing the other letters in outline, and it includes letters from the shoresh which were dropped in conjugation in minuscule type. The book is entirely in Hebrew and I can't read the introduction, so I don't know what other notational conventions ...


11

The Lubavitcher Rebber writes that Television is forbidden because: It is so immodest, that even non-Jews started campaigning against it. It incites people to violence. (Watching movies with people killing each other causes one to think about murder). One will not be able to tell his children to watch only "kosher" material, as they will answer back "but ...


9

Here is a link to Shiras Moshe which contains the poems of the Chasam Sofer.


9

Looks like there was indeed a book of these published in 1975, which is available for viewing on the Internet Archive (see "View the book" in the sidebar). Here is a guide to using it, and this page on Hebrew Wikigenia mentions some reprints and updates to it.


8

Rav Moshe held it was assur (forbidden) to go to movies and theaters. Rav Nebontzol (Rav of the old city of Yerushalayim and Talmid (student) of Rav Shlomo Zalman) writes in his Mishna Brura (B'Yitzchak Yikrah) in chelek 6 in the back (hanhagos v'minhagim number 3) that Television is assur. If you can get your hands on this ,it provides close to a hundred ...


7

This issue is discussed here. Summary: Magazine subscriptions to Jewish-owned publications are forbidden only where the discount is explicitly or obviously linked to the advance payment. In this case, the discount is usually linked to other factors, so most poskim permit it. A little research online shows that the primary reasons that magazine publishers ...


7

I believe that the work you are referring to is Chizuk Emunah, "Faith Strengthened" by Isaac Troki, it is my recollection that this was relatively well received in traditional circles as well.


7

The Tanakh Simanim is based for the most part on the Aleppo Codex, and where this version is lacking, on the Leningrad Codex. (see footnote 9 here). As such it is an authoritative version that you can rely on. In addition Feldheim is a well-known Orthodox publishing house with an excellent reputation. Be aware though that the Feldheim edition is Hebrew-...


6

The original Heberw text can be found in קריינא דאיגרתא volume 1. Here is my translation. 1 Nisan 5735 See the Rambam z"l in Hilchos Avodah Zarah, Chpt 2, Halacha 2 who explains the prohibition to read books which have material relating to avodah zarah (idol worship) and also that it is prohibited to see the pictures in them, for the verse says "Do not ...


6

I have once heard that such technique was done because in the early days of book-binding, paper was very expensive and some books, including judaica, was printed on 'recycled' or scrap paper. This paper would be of random colors and element exposures. When stacked, the sides of the paper would be the colored splotches.


6

If you ever look at sfarim that are commonly opened to specific sections (like a siddur), you'll notice that there are black lines around those pages that are more commonly used (you could, for example, land almost exactly on the last page of Shacharis). When the pages are colored, you don't see those lines.


6

Thanks to all who made some great suggestions. First let me correct the spelling of the word: it should be PRENUMERANTEN (an extra N in there). I duly found the Berel Kagan book (at UCLA's Research library) and in Hebrewbooks.org, where his name is written as כהן for those who might also try to look). So far, I personally have not found anything else ...


6

The Nitei Gavriel wrote a letter to the Lubavitcher Rebbe about publishing the pictures of the Rebbetzin, and the Lubavitcher Rebbe's response (in bold): ב"ה, י"א אדר [תשמ"ח] לכבוד כ"ק אדמו"ר הגה"ק שליט"א באתי להעיר אודות שיצא לאור ספר אמנו "המלכה" בודאי הבחין בהפשוט גם בלא הסתכלות כלל - אשר במהדורא אחרת הוסיפו בלי צבעים תמונה מהרבנית ע"ה ולפענ"ד אינו ...


6

A calendar is important for the dead - this way the living can figure out when their Yarzheit is, and say Kaddish and learn as a Zechus for the Neshama.


6

None of the principles that you cited imply that your line of thinking should be identical to that of your neighbor. Your reasoning does not make sense. There absolutely is value in making sure that your rejection is diplomatic; however, the fact that somebody else thinks that his paper is important does not mean that it is. Of course, you should try to ...


5

I answered this question to a larger extent here, using this article from R J J Schachter (I read the article years ago - it is wonderful). To quote the reasons most relevant to this question Some formulations of the original herem are phrased "if [the recipient] threw away the letter it is permitted [to read it]" R Hayim Palaggi states the herem ...


5

As Noach has pointed out, Tom. stands for Latin "tomus", volume, thus you have volume one of a mahzor, or holiday prayer book. The Schlesingers were a well-known Austro-Hungarian family whose printing firm specialized in printing prayerbooks (see here and here). If you can post a scan of the title page we will be able to tell you more about it and what it ...


5

I have also had this question for some time and I was glad to see someone else asking it. From my research into book binding techniques it is obvious that it comes from various decoration techniques. This style seems to come from the Victorian era, but I am not sure how it got into the Jewish book printing business and seems to have stuck around longer. I ...


5

The Business Halacha Institute discusses your very question about a Jewish newspaper: “The magazine was aware that your subscription expired, yet knowingly sent additional issues,” explained Rabbi Dayan. “The Gemara (B.M. 23b, 25b, 31a) teaches that there is no obligation of hashavas aveidah when someone is knowingly reckless with his property (...


5

I have a somewhat novel approach, I have not heard this anywhere...it is pure speculation :) We know that one of the goals of the way Rebbi Yehuda Hanassi structured the Mishna was in order to make it easy to remember by heart. Maybe it was structured that way in order to remember the order of the chapters better. Meaning if the topic of one chapter ...


4

Your best bet is probably Otzar Hachochma. Their online version is here (click on the rightmost link to enter as a guest). There is a search box on the top, in which you can search for terms like קעזמארק. In the free version, however, they only let you see snippets of the results. Also be aware that the search is based on OCR, which is not always accurate. ...


4

If I recall correctly there were some concerns (at least a few years ago) with corn-derived preservatives or packaging materials with regards to some packaged nuts. It may not be "chopping the walnuts makes them kitniyot", but "your average bag of chopped walnuts bought at the store may have been treated with some kitniyot product." But there are a zillion ...


4

You should contact Rabbi Yehuda Horovitz who is a world acclaimed genealogist in Jerusalem and owns the largest collection in the world of Prenumeranten lists. his email is: yudaron@yahoo.comh


4

I'm not sure there is a "typical" commentary by which to judge some standard length. I have an old copy of a Haggadah published by the Staten Island Yeshivah from 1947, which is pamphlet-length in its entirety, despite having a good deal of commentary throughout, and the "Torat Hyim" Haggadah, which is over 200 pages long, despite its mostly short ...


4

The Ketuvim Publishers has the complete Shulchan Aruch with the Rama in one volume. In the introduction the editor explains that the Bais Yosef intended the Shulchan Aruch to be studied and completed every 30 days as I mentioned in my question. The editor also added a complete calender on how the Shulchan Aruch was intended to be learned.


4

I came across a copy of ספורי חסידם, and at the end of the volume on festivals, there is a general source page. It lists the sources, but not specific page numbers, or specific sources for individual sources. I took a picture:


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