14

In the introduction to his commentary on Masekhet Avot (Shemonah Peraqim), chapter five, the Rambam says (in Shmuel ibn Tibbon's translation): והוא הדין מי שהתרגשה עליו מרה שחורה, ועמד והסירה בשמיעת הניגונים ובמיני הזמר, ובטיול בגינות ובבניינים נאים, ובישיבה עם צורות נאות וכיוצא בדברים שמרחיבים הנפש ומסירים הרהוריו הקודרים ממנה.‏ In an English ...


9

Yad Efraim Yoreh Deah 36:14 discusses the trauma of chickens seeing other chickens slaughtered. He says that this causes the chickens much distress and they become treifos from their lungs drying out from fear. He also says that in slaughter houses, animals should not be slaughtered in plain view of other animals because it is Tzaar Baalei Chaim. He ...


9

The Talmud in Bava Kama 91a talks about inducing panic in someone -- "our courts can't charge the person, but Heaven will take him to task." I would assume the same would apply here, at first glance. (I'm not well-read on the halachic literature on the subject.) The classical examples of charging for embarrassment involve physical actions such as spitting ...


8

Rabbi Bodner (Halachos of Refuah on Shabbos) writes (page 242) that insomnia is classified as a מיחוש בעלמא, an "ailment" that isn't serious. (though if someone suspects that they suffer from chronic insomnia, they should see a sleep specialist after Shabbos) The rules for מיחוש בעלמא are found in chapter 1 of that work; the most basic rule being that one ...


8

In general, the Torah is not so concerned and doesn't judge how people feel or what their desires are. It is mainly concerned in how we act. Nowhere does the Torah consider feelings for same-sex people to be a prohibition. But the Torah is concerned about actions and as is well known homosexual male intercourse is forbidden. The gmara in Kiddushin 40a ...


7

Marry a wife Pele Yoetz (here) says it helps with sin Seifer Hachinuch (mitzva 582.2) explains that the reason of the Mitvzah that after the first year of marriage you need to be happy with your wife is that you should (get use to her, since you like what you are use to and) and to make **all other woman disgusting for you ** (I guess this will include ...


7

In terms of actual prohibitions: 1- Male homosexual sex is prohibited to both Jew, and under the covenant G-d made with Noah, to non-Jews as well. 2- Male homosexual intimacy that is not prohibited under #1 is prohibited to Jews under the same kinds of laws that prohibit masturbation. 3- At least some forms of female homosexual sex if not all are ...


6

Shmirat Shabbat K'hilchatah 33:16 writes: מי שמצטער הרבה מחוסר שינה, מותר לו לקחת כדורי-שינה. Someone who suffers greatly from lack of sleep (insomnia) is allowed to take sleeping pills. (my translation) If even sleeping pills are allowed for someone who suffers greatly from insomnia, then some tea should certainly be OK.


6

Sefer Asia - page 244 and page 245 brings different stories quoted by Rabbi Chaim Miller of such situations. Amongst those quoted that urged giving a name prior to a Bris in order to be able to have a name to Daven for were Rabbi Yechezkel Levenstein Zatzal, The Ozorover Rabbi Zatzal, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein Zatzal, Rabbi Eliezer Man Shach Zatzal, and the ...


6

The Chofetz Chaim writes in a note to the fifth detail of permissible Lashon Hara in Hilchos Lashon Hara 10:14 אפשר דהוא הדין אם כוונתו בסיפורו להפיג את דאגתו מלבו - הוי כמכוון לתועלת על להבא, [ולפי זה מה שאמרו ז"ל, דאגה בלב איש ישיחנה לאחרים, קאי גם על ענין כזה]. אך שיזהר שלא יחסרו שאר הפרטים שבסעיף זה" It is possible that the same [allowance] ...


6

Like many other beliefs, Judaism doesn't have a clear opinion on the matter, but individual Jews do. Rashi, for example, believed in demons and gives that explanation of ruah raah in Eruvin 45b s.v. ruah ra'ah. Accordingly, Saul's possession by the ruah raah (I Samuel 16:14) would be a demonic possession. However, like most other things, there is not a ...


6

A very relevant passage is Nidda (47a) which relates that Sh'muel, examined the body of his slave, to better understand the maturity process and at which point bagrut is achieved. He then paid her 400 zuz to compensate her for the indignity. He explained that the Torah allows one to work a slave; not to embarrass her. It seems that compensation was ...


6

One is exempt (from punishment) by extinguishing a flame on Sabbath for the sake of an emotionally ill person (cf. Rambam's commentary to Mishnah Shab. 2:5). Emotional instability/numbness also renders a Kohen unfit for service in the Temple (Bech. 7:5). From the above I believe an emotionally "disabled" person can be considered a choleh for who Mi she'...


6

Maimonides did call him a madman. See the translation of his Epistle to Yemen here (3rd paragraph) or here on Sefaria (search for "madman"). To summarize the historical background (brought here) About the year 1168, the Jews of Yemen were confronted with a three-pronged agonizing problem. A fanatical Moslem cleric became the ruler of this distant, ...


5

Someone with Downs who cannot understand the mitzvah in question would be a pesi. A shoteh is someone incapable of choosing right over wrong. The Rambam may have blamed that on an inability to comprehend, but more modern psychological theories would attribute it to impulse control, an inability to relate to consequences, and psychiatric rather than ...


5

Anyone discussing OCD and halacha needs to find a qualified, competent rabbi in-person, as well as a mental-health professional. Reviewing the laws of what actually poses a halachic problem for handwashing might help, depending on the level of one's problem. The entire practice today is a throwback to when ritual purity laws were applicable ... but this is ...


4

BSD Firstly I would like to preface that anything I say should be taken on case by case basis. As one who is an Orthdox Jew and has a history of dealing with medium to mild OCD, I can only provide suggestions from my own personal experience, so dont take this post as scripture. Your Question: Should we intervene with someone who has OCD. The answer is ...


4

Rabbi Shmuel Singer in his book "A Parent's Guide to Teaching Children Mitzvot: A Halakhic Guide" with the Haskama of Rav Hershel Schechter writes: (on page 143) Modern poskim agree that if a special child has the potential to achieve the intellectual level of an average six-year-old... Upon reaching bar or bat mitzvah such a child will be obligated to ...


4

There is actually an argument in the Midrash with relevant psukim where a person's חכמה resides. See ילקוט שמעוני right at the begining of משלי. Siman תתקכט. There is an argument there between Rabi Eliazar who said it's in one's head and Rabi Yehoshua who says it's in one's heart. The Midrash brings Psukim to show that David Hamelech and Shlomo Hamelech ...


4

Rabbi Abraham Twerski has written many books that might be of the type that you need. Check out the list of books and videos at his web site to see if they are what you need. GuardUrEyes A website for Jews struggling to maintain their moral purity in today's world


4

Mentally ill individuals are known as a shoteh. People who are classified as such are exempt from all mitzvot obligations. (Chagiga 2b) However, determining whether a person is a shoteh must be done on a case-by-case basis. Please see Who is a Shoteh? and the sources below for more information. In particular, As a result of this characterization of the ...


4

See Does Down Syndrome make one a Shoteh? . Generally, they are obligated in whatever mitzvot their consciousness can support. If someone's actions indicate they're completely disconnected from reality (hard to define), then they could reach the threshold of a shoteh and be exempted from everything. There are 50 places in Rambam's code where he takes for ...


4

Searching YUTorah for "OCD" produces this list of 11 shiurim on the topic. The one of those shiurim that I've listened to was carefully researched from both the Torah and medical perspectives, at least two others are by people I would trust to be careful with these issues, and incidentally, 5 are given by doctors. They include halacha and hashkafa shiurim, ...


4

The halacha in C.M. 420'32' states that a person who scares and alarms his friend who in turn is damaged emotionally is not liable in beit din as the Gemara in Baba Kama 91'a' explains that it was he himself who let himself become frightened and be disturbed. A person possessing strength and confidence shall not get blown away by this. This, according to ...


4

When a person did lose his free choice, we say that he became Shote, loosely linked to the inaccurate term of "crazy" or insane. He is categorized as a child regarding responsibility and this state is often reversed to sanity. For instance mishna Gittin 2.6: קיבל הקטן והגדיל, חירש ונתפקח, סומא ונתפתח, שוטה ונשתפה, נוכרי ונתגייר--פסול. אבל פיקח ונתחרש ...


4

Firstly, I wish you strength to get through this ordeal. I am certain that Hashem knows your intentions are good and He only gives tests to those who He knows can pass them. There is quite a dearth of material online that can help provide an effective approach to dealing with this situation. I have taken a couple of these and tried to weave them into an ...


3

Getting divorced would NOT serve as any halachic basis for an abortion. This is evident from the a Teshuvah in Choshen Mishpat (Siman 69) (Volume 7, page 300) of "Igros Moshe", where Rav Moshe Feinstein, zt"l, wrote that abortion is prohibited but didn't mention an exception for someone getting divorced. In that Teshuvah Rav Moshe wrote about how terrible ...


3

I would like to exhort the questioner not to approach an acquaintance who he feels may have a problem, with one caveat. If he is a medical professional with significant training in psychiatric symptomatology and diagnosis, then he indeed has a duty to approach this person (or perhaps better still, to approach the rabbi, as discussed below.) Otherwise, I want ...


3

R David Sperling (here) writes it seems to him that taking these medicines is permitted because Firstly, someone who has started on a course of pills before Shabbat may continue to take them even on Shabbat (see Shmirat Shabbat KeHilchatah, 34, 17). Secondly, it is not clear that someone with ADHD is considered at all "sick" or "under the ...


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