12

Rashi, a renowned 11th Century commentator on the Bible and Talmud, wrote that this "little horn" in Daniel 7:8 that is "speaking arrogantly" refers to Titus, the one who destroyed the Holy Temple and Jerusalem. He writes thus: :ממלל רברבן. דברי גאוה, הוא טיטוס שאחז"ל שחרף וגדף ונכנס להיכל בעזות פנים "Speaking arrogantly." Words of arrogance. He is ...


7

There was once a book that had all the cures you are talking about, but it was buried. In the mishna of Psachim 4:9 it says that the king Chizkia buried "the book of cures": ששה דברים עשה חזקיה המלך על שלשה הודו לו ועל שלשה לא הודו לו. גירר עצמות אביו על מטה של חבלים והודו לו. כיתת נחש הנחשת והודו לו. גנז ספר רפואות והודו לו. The Tashbetz writes (סימן ...


7

There are numerous prophecies about the Messianic era and they are generally viewed together as a "single package". As such, Orthodox Judaism is hesitant to declare a single prophecy of that package fulfilled in case there is a snag in the fulfillment of the other and it turns out that that declaration was in error. The more Zionist groups of Orthodoxy will ...


7

Note that the definition of prophecy that you quote is a prophet is an individual who receives a message from G‑d to transmit to the people. This means that if the message involves the past, the present or the future, it would still be a valid message. Examples in the Torah would include the events that involved Par'o and his servants when Moshe was not ...


6

While the verse cited does predict a return of the Jews to the land of Israel it also includes details which have not yet been realized. The return of large numbers of Jews to Israel and an independent Jewish state are a necessary condition for the fulfillment of this prophecy (and others) but not a sufficient condition for its fulfillment. That this ...


6

On the assumption that this post is different because it asks specifically what are the Messianic prophecies, and may therefore survive the challenge that it is repetitive of other questions, I will answer. There are eligibility rules for the Messiah based on various verseus. These are: He must be Jewish -- Deut. 17:15 prohibits us setting a non-Jew as a ...


6

Don Yitzchak Abarbanel wrote a book that is the answer to this question. He organizes all of the prophecies in Tana"ch that he holds to be foretelling Mashi'ach by person, starting with Bil'am, in משמיע ישועה (Mashmi'a Y'shu'a). Here is the outline, but read the full book for his argumentation and proofs. 1st Harbinger - Bil'am: נאם בלעם בנו בעור וכו 2nd ...


5

There is a tradition that these three people had asked Ezekiel whether they would be saved, and he responded in the negative. The story is referred to in Zohar Toldos 142a but discussed at length in Midrash Rabba Shir Hashirim (sometimes called Midrash Chazis) 7:13. There, a long discussion is recorded between these three would-be martyrs and the prophet ...


5

A prophet is confirmed as a true prophet by repeatedly making accurate predictions of the future (and only accurate predictions) or by the [direct] testimony of another confirmed prophet. Mishneh Torah 10:5 When a prophet proclaims that another individual is [also] a prophet, we accept the latter as a prophet without requiring [any further] ...


5

You can see Rashi's commentary to the chapter in English here. Joshua was being accused because his sons had married to gentile women and he did not interfere. This was symbolized by the filthy garments which were then removed and replaced with clean ones, alluding that his sons should separate from their wives, and he would be forgiven and the sins would be ...


4

Predictions are a Funny thing, especially when you allow a given year like 1840 to span a large amount of time. The early half of the 1800s was a very "active" period in Jewish history, with many things greatly affecting Jewish life today. During the era, was the formation of Modern Zionism. With the Students of the Vilna Gaon moving to Israel in the 1860s ...


4

There seems to me to be a few reasons that the Book of Nahum/fate of Nineveh is important to Jews for all time. I am not familiar with Mishna/Gemara/Tosafot/Geonic materials(..yet...) so there could be plenty of Rabbinic views on Nahum, but to me the main reason that Nahum and Nineveh's fate are important is because Judah and Israel were oppressed ...


4

I'm sure there are simpler and deeper answers, but if we go with the Midrash that the king of Nineveh was none other than the Pharaoh of Exodus -- yes, that guy who repeatedly ignored Moses' warnings, watched his empire unravel in a matter of months because of it, then eventually washed ashore from the Red Sea (the lone survivor) -- well, you'd understand ...


4

From the plain reading of the text (Daniel 3:17-18), we see that they were unsure whether Hashem would save them. In particular, they say (3:18) והן לא (and if [Hashem does] not [save us]). In Shir HaShirim Rabbah (on 7:8, על דעת ר׳ שמעון), we see a midrash that relates how Chananiah, Mishael, and Azariah went to Ezekiel to ask whether Hashem would be ...


4

Rashi says - as I've always been taught - that Yaakov intended to inform them the time of the final redemption. רש"י ואגידה לכם. בקש לגלות את הקץ ונסתלקה ממנו שכינה, והתחיל אומר דברים אחרים (ב"ר צח, ב.): (רש"י) ‏ At that point the information was withheld from him and he started talking about other things - i.e. blessing each one, as Rashi ...


4

If Hashem wanted a ready-made world with nothing left to explore, He could have just stayed with a כסא הכבוד, or better yet, הוא ושמו. This world was created with the theme of constant improvement. Almost all sciences are still unfinished, even language. The same goes for Torah. Although the prophets and Tanaim knew more Torah than we do, the Torah grew and ...


4

In The Jewish Study Bible (2nd edition, 2014), Lawrence M. Wills asserts that the little horn is Antiochus Epiphanes. Ditto 'Daniel, Book of' in Jewish Encyclopedia (online) by Emil G. Hirsch and Eduard König: 'The little horn described in Dan. viii. 9-12, 23-25 has the same general characteristics as the little horn in vii. 8, 20; hence the same ruler is ...


3

The question is based on the wrong premise. The actual commandment is "Do not Murder" not "Do not Kill". Your question implies that one may not even kill in sef-defense which is untrue. That is, you start the question "Is it allowed to kill" which implies under any circumstances and connect it with the settling of the land. This makes it sound as if causing ...


3

I understand the Rambam below is referring to your chapter (so no it is referring to the one not yet built (it shloud be speedily rebuilt) The rambam  » Mishneh Torah» Sefer Avodah » Beit Habechirah »  1 » 4 The [design of the] structure built by [King] Solomon is described explicitly in [the Book of] Kings. [In contrast, the design of] the Messianic ...


3

The word כשרה can also be read כְּשָׂרָה — "like Sarah" — perhaps reflecting that they were both childless, praying to have children.


3

The verse says clearly who will 'shake' all nations: God. (Verse 6 says "so said God…" and verse 7 continues "I will shake all the nations".) So your question as to which nation will shake all other nations has no answer based in Haggai. But what is referred to in verse 7 as (in very rough translation) "the best of all the nations&...


3

See Aryeh Morgenstern's Hastening Redemption which discusses the messianic agenda of the Vilna Gaon's student who immigrated to the Land of Israel in the early 19th century. In Chapter 2, "Belief in 5600 (1840) As The Year of Redemption", Morgenstern provides two primary sources for the year 1840, the Zohar cited in your question and an opinion from ...


3

Judaism often relates to descriptions such as son and father as metaphorical, regarding the relationship between God and the Jewish people. The daat mikra Tanach explains the psalm to be divided into 4 parts with different speakers, verses 1-3 being the non Jewish nations, 4-6 being God to the nations 7-9 being the king relating God's words to him and 10-12 ...


3

It should be recognized that most prophetic oracles are not "foretelling" oracles, but rather "forthtelling," i.e. speaking an uncomfortable truth to the prescribed audience, usually to a powerful authority; e.g. Nathan's warnings to King David in Samuel, Kings, and Chronicles (especially 2 Samuel 7:2-17, 12:1-25) or Yonah's warnings to Nineveh. The latter ...


2

Regarding your first point: In addition to the general understanding that Hashem appearing to someone is generally in a dream (as sourced by @Mevaqesh above), a number of Mefarshim to 31:29 (including Radak, Targum Onkelos, and Targum pseudo-Yonasan) note that Emesh implies the previous night (i.e. during sleep). It is therefore not noteworthy that Lavan ...


2

I have heard in the name of the Chida - that women have three special Mitzvos - which is the Roshei Teivos of Chana - Ches = Chalah, Nun = Nidah, Hei = Hadlokas HaNer - and a woman who does these three is considered a Isha Ksheirah. Notwithstanding the above there is a Medrash Breishis Rabsi Parshas Chaya Sara 23:1 which lists 22 Isha Ksheiras and one of ...


2

For the question of whether Jesus could have been the moshiach (summary: no), see this question. In a comment you say that your question isn't a duplicate of that but, rather: I want to know whether Jesus fulfills the messianic prophecies the best. Which he may do even if Jews by and large do not think he is the messiah. This doesn't really compute for ...


2

See Did the Jews Disregard Ezekiel's Prophecy of the Temple and also Why Haven't the Jews Rebuilt the Temple Yet?. Rabbi Yehuda Shurpin in these two articles states that the Second Temple was not modeled after Ezekiel's temple (reason given) and that only in the Messianic age will it be built exactly as he described it.


2

Man's blessing in Gen 1:28 reads: וַיְבָרֶךְ אֹתָם, אֱלֹהִים, וַיֹּאמֶר לָהֶם אֱלֹהִים פְּרוּ וּרְבוּ וּמִלְאוּ אֶת-הָאָרֶץ, וְכִבְשֻׁהָ; וּרְדוּ בִּדְגַת הַיָּם, וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם, וּבְכָל-חַיָּה, הָרֹמֶשֶׂת עַל-הָאָרֶץ. And God blessed them; and God said unto them: 'Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the earth, and subdue it; and have dominion over ...


2

Putting aside the aspects of e.g. the creation story (as interpreted by the medieval Rishonim) that have been confirmed by modern science (e.g. creatio ex nihilo, evolution [see e.g the Drashot Haran], "intelligent design", non-determinism/quantum mechanics) as well as predictions about apocolyptic devastation that strikingly parallel aspects of a nuclear ...


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