20

It's one of 10 traditional exceptions to the rules of BeGeD KePeT recorded by the master masorete Ben Asher in his Dikdukei haTa'amim. Minchat Shai records two homiletic explanations: The second מי כמכה follows God's name and we don't want it to sound like we are declaring God to be a fellow named מיכה. The stronger form in the latter phrase indicates a ...


16

Essentially, a mistaken edition of the Radak was popular for a short time, leading to various changes by overzealous grammarians and confusing two very influential rabbis. See the extensive (hundreds of manuscripts/editions surveyed) documentation of Dr. Yitzchak/Jordan Penkower in Iyyunei Miqra uFarshanut, vol. 4, Bar Ilan University Press, 1997, greatly ...


14

Chanoch and Ariel K are correct in their answer, but one can answer at greater length and detail. The letters beged kefet, בגד כפת are distinguished from other Hebrew letters in taking a dagesh kal, a 'weak' dagesh, at the start of words or after a shva nach. The function of this dagesh kal is to distinguish between the plosive and fricative versions of the ...


14

From what I can tell, either way you accent this word is probably fine. My understanding, based on Biblical grammar My understanding is that the accent in this case goes on the 'mo' syllable1, due to the rule of "nasog achor." This rule says that when multi-syllabic Word A is followed (without disjunctive cantillation) by Word B, and Word B has an accent ...


13

The short answer is that modern yeshiva students recite it with a tzeirei because this is brought in the Mishna Berura which has become a very popular sefer for "p'sak". The Mishna Berura brought it because of the weight he gives to the Pri Megadim, who quotes this version in the name of R' Hanau. A more interesting and comprehensive background with ...


13

The following is adapted from Dovid Katz, "The Phonology of Ashkenazic," in Hebrew in Ashkenaz: A Language in Exile, ed. Lewis Glinert (Oxford University Press, 1993), pp. 61-65. Apparently, at least from the 16th century onwards, there was a distinction among (some) Ashkenazim between the sounds of kubbutz and shuruk, with the former being pronounced like ...


12

Rabbi Bogomilsky compiles several opinions about how to say the name, including the ones mentioned in other answers. In short (see there for sources): Read with two "ש" until Bamidbar 26:24, then it is read with only one "ש". As Alex answered. Read with two "ש" the first time, after that it is only read with one. As Yahu answered. Chabad always reads it ...


12

I linked in the comments to the question to an article by Dan Rabinowitz published by Hakirah journal regarding Jewish sources pertaining to the origin of the nekudos. [Note that although the taamim of the Tanach are not mentioned throughout the article, it seems implicit in most of the sources (and in the main source, actually explicit) that the same ...


11

Why is there a silent ש in the name Yissochor? The Daas Zkeineem tells us the reason Layoh put two letters of ש in t Yissochor: One for the שכר-reward for giving Zilpoh to Yaakov as a wife, the second for giving the flowers that were to help Rochail become pregnant. To reveal the story of the flowers, however, would possibly embarrass Rochail. In order ...


11

Apparently, it's due to a misinterpretation of the m'sora. By the rules of grammar, both should be mil'el, but, according to the m'sora, both are mil'ra. The m'sora was misinterpreted to mean that hoshia is mil'el while hatzlicha is mil'ra, and that's the way people read it now. Source: an old mesorah-listserv thread on the topic, in particular one message ...


11

This answer assumes you're talking about conversation. My theory is that Yiddish and English, being mostly accented on the penultimate syllable, shift Hebrew to the same in natural Yiddish/Yinglish/English speech. Thus kash-RUTH becomes KASH-rus. Then the vowel on the ultimate syllable gets compressed to a shwa. KASH-rəs, which sounds like KASH-rihs.


11

I highly doubt there is any significance to such a pronunciation (although I stand to be corrected) but since you ask, here is a technical explanation (based on here and here): There are two types of sounds - ones where you use your voice, like b, d, g, f and z, and ones where you don't like p, t, k, v, and s. The ones that you use your voice for are called ...


10

The "quasi-Sephardic pronunciation" you refer to is actually Israeli Hebrew which the Conservative movement (and Modern Orthodox movement and Reform movement) have lately been teaching. The traditional Conservative movement was built off of the Reform movement which was built off of German minhag - thus a boy wears a tallis when he turns 13, regardless of ...


10

In this recent blog post, Rabbi Ari Enkin paraphrases Israel Rubin in "The How & Why of Jewish Prayer" explaining that the correct pronunciation of the Tetrargrammaton was lost during the Second Temple Period.


10

In the introduction of the Chovot Halevavot published by Mosad Harav Kook, he brings that it is not known how to pronounce the name. He says that Ashkenazim pronounce it Bechaye, and Sefardim pronounce it Bachye. See there for some other opinions and rationals as well.


9

According to Rabbi Jeremy Weider (in his Introduction to Bible course, which can be found on YUTorah.org) it is a kri u'ketiv. Because this is a common kri u'ketiv it is written in the text without note (like the spelling of naarah without the final hey and other examples).


9

The expression is taken from the Talumd (Shabbat 87a and several other locations). The sage Resh Lakish expands the word "אשר" to the now ubiquitous "ישר כחך" . You can see from the following Talmudic excerpt (Shabbat 87a) that the original use was to validate Moshe Rabeinu's action. It would seem to me that current usage is quite the same. When one ...


9

I haven't vetted these but they might be worth working through http://www.kehilathadar.org/content/davening-audio-files http://sidduraudio.com/ http://www.toraschaimdallas.org/resources/weekday-davening-2/ I just ran a google search and found a bunch. I also know that too much information can be as problematic as too little. You should ask your Rabbi to ...


9

The Talmud (Shabbat 104a) spells it out as תיו. So anything from Taw to Tau to Tav is probably in the right ballpark. The unvoicing of the 'v' to make 'f' in common parlance is a common feature of speech (see also this parallel question).


9

R. Reuven Margalios in his פנינים ומרגליות has a note on this name. His theory is that it is not an actual name, but a nickname which means "may he live long," like the (Yiddish) name "Alter." He proves that it is not a real name because in a manuscript of Kad ha-Kemach, the author is listed as R. Yehuda. According to this, it would presumably be pronounced ...


9

Essentially there should be no vowel, but for certain guttaral consonants (specifically, Hei, Chet, and Ayin) it's hard to end a word like that ("NoH"?), so an extra half-vowel is placed before the final consonant. This is not a full Patach, but a half-vowel (not unlike how a Shva Na' isn't counted as a syllable) known as a "furtive Patach" or "פתח גנובה". ...


9

Yam Shel Shlomo in chapter 4 of Bava Kamma says to pronounce it beya as the other word is not nice. This is subsequently brought in the Magen Avraham in siman 156 which is probably where it picked up it's popularity. Tiferes Yisroel in the beginning of the masechta named after the word in question, writes that he can't understand who wouldn't like the ...


9

Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 61:21-22: צריך בכל אל"ף שאחר מ"ם להפסיק ביניהם כגון ולמדתם אותם וקשרתם אותם ושמתם את ... שלא יהא נראה כקורא מותם מת. אף בפסוקי דזמרה ובתפלה צריך לדקדק בכך [During Keriat Shema] one must pause before an aleph that follows a mem (e.g. ulmadtem otam, ukshartem otam, vesamtem et) ... so that he doesn't seem to be reading motam ...


9

I've contacted Dovid Katz from Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, a renown scholar of the Yiddish language (among others), who wrote numerous papers on linguistics, and his PhD dissertation discussed in detail the phonology of the language(s) that Ashkenazi Jews spoke. As I could understand of his letter and his works, there was a proto-Ashkenazi long ō ...


9

כִּי-אָז אֶהְפֹּךְ אֶל-עַמִּים, שָׂפָה בְרוּרָה, לִקְרֹא כֻלָּם בְּשֵׁם יְהוָה, לְעָבְדוֹ שְׁכֶם אֶחָד. (צפניה ג:ט)‏ For then will I turn to the peoples a pure language, that they may all call upon the name of the LORD, to serve Him with one consent. (Zefania 3:9) Yes, everyone should change. See R' Yosef Eliyahu Henkin (Edut LeYisrael 60), Igrot ...


8

In the Hebrew dialect of Habbani Jews (type of Temanim), we maintain a double pronunciation of resh, as well as a few other sounds I'm not aware of other dialects having. The main pronunciation of resh is a regular rolled r, like exists in Arabic and Spanish. The soft resh is much like an English r, but more emphatic, as if you were about to roll it but ...


8

Tosfot (Sukkah 5a s.v. Yod) says that saying "Yod - Hey" is ok if the intention is not for the name יה but as a abbreviation of the Tetragrammaton. This implies that they understand that spelling out the letters can be problematic as well.


8

The letters בגד כפת have two versions, one with Dagesh and one without. It gets a Dagesh after a closed syllable, or in the beginning of a word. In this instance, the previous word ends with an open syllable. Therefore the פ does not receive a Dagesh. What of many instances where we see a word-initial פ receive a Dagesh where the previous word ended with ...


8

As I learned in the various Aramaic language classes I took in Revel, the yud in these cases is silent, and only exists to show the plurality. The parallel is to Hebrew, where the yud appears after the segol, but is also entirely unpronounced. For example in אֲבוֹתֶיךָ, it is to be pronounced avotecha, not avoteycha.


8

Rashi says why this change turns the blessing into a curse pretty clearly in his comment on Megillah 24b. You should have checked the source material before asking your question. Nevertheless, I will provide it here for your convenience. He says: מפני שקורין לאלפין עיינין ולעיינין אלפין. ואם היו עושין ברכת כהנים היו אומרים יאר יער ה׳ פניו ולשון קללה הוא ...


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