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You might want to consider The Living Torah and The Living Nach. Here’s a link to the Wikipedia article discussing them.


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I can put a word in for Robert Alter's edition (link). Although it includes no Hebrew, it's a Jewish translation - and one of the first translations by a single individual rather than a committee - which preserves as much of the Hebrew poetry, wordplay and allusion as possible. There's also a short companion volume on the translator's technique.


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Sefaria has Rashi with nekudos and translated into English https://www.sefaria.org/Joshua.1.1?lang=bi&with=Rashi&lang2=he Metsudah has also put out Nach with Rashi with nekudos and translated. https://www.amazon.com/Metsudah-Tanach-Book-Melachim/dp/B000PVSWS6


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I'm not familiar with the book you read, so I don't know if it's similar. But I highly recommend "[Lieutenant Birnbaum][1]." It's the autobiography of Meyer Birnbaum z"l. He was drafted and served during WWII, liberating the camps and helping the prisoners afterwards. (He was the translator for General Eisenhower in the camps, among other rare ...


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You might want to consider Rabbi Lawrence Kelemen's two books: Permission to Believe Review on Amazon: The most perplexing question of all times: does G-d really exist? And is it really irrational to believe so? World renowned lecturer and educator Rabbi Lawrence Kelemen, Harvard graduate, examines the case for G-d in this intellectually groundbreaking book. ...


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There is also the Vilna edition (1882) and reprints thereof. Part 1 Part 2 Part 3


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