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Abraham Joshua Heschel's seminal work "The Prophets" is a discourse on what the prophets of Tanach were, what they experienced, the mechanism of their message, purpose and so forth. The book has several chapters focused specifically on the 'experience of prophecy', and also compares and contrasts the Jewish conception of prophecy vis a vis other ...


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Rambam in his Moreh Nevuchim - Part 2, particularly in Chapter 35 and Chapter 36 speaks about the inner workings of Prophecy. Chapter 35 specifically looks at the nevuah of Moshe compared to the other Neviim. Meanwhile Chapter 36 analyses how prophecy actually works. I found on Hebrewbooks a sefer entitled Maalos HaNevuah authored by someone called Chacham ...


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Two excellent books in English are Meditation and the Bible and Meditation and Kabbalah both by Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan z”l. They will give you the basic keys to unlocking the book by the Rokeach that you are looking at.


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One book I would really recommend is the two-volume series entitled Journey through Nach by Rabbi Daniel Fine and Chaim Golker. It has a very comprehensive summary of each perek in Nach and provides a full overview of everything. The blurb writes as follows: This thoroughly researched work allows the reader to familiarize himself with major events, ...


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There is, the machzor used by (and published by) the Zilberman yeashiva of Jerusalem's Old City and the Horva synagogue. They say most of the piyutim said by other yeshivos that I am familiar with, but after the chazan's repetition instead of during, other than the avoda piyut of Yom Kippur. These are printed there and not in the traditional places. The ...


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The first volume of a translation of the Aruch HaShulchan into English by R Ilan Segal has now been published, it covers chapters 242-292 of Orach Chaim (on the laws of Shabbat). It has been favorably reviewed here by R Ari Enkin and here by R Josh Yuter. It does include the Hebrew as you can see on a screenshot in R Yuter's review.


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Hilchos Nidda (esp. harchakot) is a good idea.


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As has been mentioned, every couple is different so it does require a bit of thought based on where you are both holding. Secondly, it is worth remembering that your wife is not your yeshiva chavrusa(!). The story is told about a newlywed couple who decided to learn chumash and Rashi together. It was not long before they got into the swing of things, and his ...


3

It should go without saying that this question varies greatly for each couple, so I will give some general considerations before my suggestions: Take care to select works accessible to your study partner's level of training with Jewish texts. As with most aspects of relationships, early and clear communication will clear up problems as they arise. Think ...


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See https://bluefringes.com. Also, for lively discussion see https://www.facebook.com/groups/techeiles .


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Yad Moshe, the classic index to Igrot Moshe, authored by Daniel Eidensohn now exists in English. It is printed on demand so shouldn't get out of stock. Here is a sample picture


3

Dirshu has an excellent Hebrew index on all 6 volumes of Mishna Brura, in one volume covering 6,000 categories and 30,000 sub-categories over 600 pages. You can see sample pages here. Although it is in Hebrew there are a few dozen pages in English at the end with words translated from modern Hebrew. See a background article on the publication of this volume ...


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