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10

Shulchan Aruch (OC 476:2) writes that those who have the custom not to eat roasted meat on the Seder nights refrain from eating any type of meat that requires slaughtering, including chicken. Although the Korban Pesach could not be offered from such meat, we are still concerned people may come to permit other types of roast. However fish meat is ...


9

Forward.com reported (2006) that plumbas were being replaced with holograms to fight fraud.


9

Babylonian Talmud, Hullin, 116a: עוף איכא בינייהו ר' עקיבא סבר חיה ועוף אינן מן התורה הא מדרבנן אסירי ור' יוסי הגלילי סבר עוף אפילו מדרבנן נמי לא אסיר תניא נמי הכי במקומו של רבי אליעזר היו כורתין עצים לעשות פחמין לעשות ברזל במקומו של רבי יוסי הגלילי היו אוכלין בשר עוף בחלב לוי איקלע לבי יוסף רישבא אייתו לקמיה רישא דטיוסא בחלבא ולא אמר להו ולא מידי כי אתא ...


6

The Torah's prohibition: Don't cook mammal meat in mammal milk. To avoid confusion, the rabbis of the Talmud made the general rule: Don't cook any meat in mammal milk. So the simple answer is -- "because the rabbis didn't ban it." Presumably they were concerned that chicken-in-milk would get confused with beef-in-milk, but didn't feel that eggs ...


6

As documented with sources here, there never was a point in time when the Rabbis decree that chicken is to be considered as meat. The meat-to-milk 6 hours waiting period was a gradual movement started by the Rif and by the time the Rambam recorded it, it already included chicken. Or perhaps the Rambam recorded his local custom and then people gradually ...


5

Glatt is about the lungs, not the timing (AFAIK) and it doesn't apply to chicken. From here, Misconception: "Glatt Kosher" means something like "extra kosher" and applies to chicken and fish as well as meat. Fact: Glatt is Yiddish for smooth, and in the context of kashrut it means that the lungs of the animal were smooth, without any adhesions that ...


5

No. The Chelev prohibitions do not apply to fowl (ShA YD 64:1). The Gid Hanasheh prohibition would only apply to a fowl which has a "circular hip joint", though there is no need to check fowl for such a joint (ibid. 65:5) and I am unaware of any commonly consumed fowl which have such a joint.


4

Assuming the premises of your case, one could perhaps address this question based on a question raised in the Talmud: Chulin 17a בעי רבי ירמיה אברי בשר נחירה שהכניסו ישראל עמהן לארץ מהו אימת אילימא בשבע שכבשו השתא דבר טמא אישתרי להו דכתיב ובתים מלאים כל טוב ואמר ר' ירמיה בר אבא אמר רב כתלי דחזירי בשר נחירה מבעיא אלא לאחר מכאן ואיבעית אימא לעולם ...


4

As explained on Chabad.org, there are multiple reasons provided for the miẓwah of separating meat and milk, which is ultimately regarded as a ḥoq (Divine decree): Some argue that it is cruel to cook a baby in the very milk that was intended to nourish it Others suggest that the reason for this mitzvah is health related. Maimonides asserts that an ...


3

The short answer -- as indicated by others, technically "Glatt" refers to how smooth the lungs are. With chickens, any question of that sort and the bird is not kosher. So there is no such thing as "Glatt" chicken. There are, however, many other halachic preferences that will distinguish a "basic kosher" product from an "extra kosher" or "mehadrin" product; ...


1

Well there is no way to find in the Halacha an approval to eat chicken with dairy. Here is a fast and short answer I found in google randomly (in Hebrew and with a translation). שלום רב נאמר בתורה 3 פעמים "לא תבשל גדי בחלב אמו" ולמדו מכך חכמים: א. איסור לבשל חלב ובשר. ב. אסור לאכול חלב ובשר. ג. אסור להנות מכך. מדובר בבשר בהמה טהורה ולא בעוף. אך ...


1

Where did they go? Why did the rabbis stop requiring that plumbas be attached to kosher chickens? According to Wikipedia , the use of Plumbas is illegal. The Israeli Ministry of Health outlawed them after an 8 month old child swallowed one, in June 2007 (As reported by בחדרי חרדים). Is there some other sign that we can rely upon? Nowadays they use ...


1

Eggs are not considered eiver min hachai because the egg is not severed from the mother, but rather the egg is released from the mother naturally. However if one struck a bird and this caused the egg to come out then the egg could be considered eiver min hachai if it is underdeveloped to the point of still being dependent on the mother to survive. In this ...


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