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1

If you ask your neighbor about this Shabbos lighting times - is it a Psak? But if you ask your Rabbi the same question? But if you ask Gdol Hador the same question? See, when does a [theoretically] Halachicly true answer turns into a Psak? (I served a prominent Posek R' Shlomo Shlezinger Z"l in Jerusalem for about 10 years and I saw him answering tens of ...


-1

I think that the validity of a Psak is measured overall by its acceptance - the more it is accepted the more it is "valid" (or maybe even "true"). Sorry I forgot to answer your question: The Turing test is just as good for Halachah as for any other field. Once people stop telling machines and Rabbis apart, Rabbi Google will become a legitimate part of ...


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An interesting and a bit complicated question. I think it is rooted in a deep misunderstanding of what a "Psak" is, to begin with. We're used to this word, but to apply it to AI we need to define it first ("see what-is-the-meaning-of-psak"). I answered it there - we need to differentiate a Psak (a verdict) and a Borerut (an arbitration). It becomes clear ...


2

Because you need to not only be familiar with all the possible mumim (as in Shalom's answer), but also to have permission from the nasi in Eretz Yisroel to rule on them, and we don't have a nasi nowadays (Taz and Shach, Yoreh Deah 309, quoting Rosh).


3

I could learn every halacha in the book ... but I would still needs hands-on experience of someone showing me a hundred examples of real-live sheep -- "this one is yes, this one is no" ... much like is done with training on Nida kesamim. Otherwise all those words attempting to describe it aren't quite going to get it across. (Talk to anyone in the kosher ...


1

Rav Eliyashiv (Vayshima Moshe 5:pg.34) held that one should not stand for the aseres hadibros. He held that those who stand and then sit for the rest of the parsha is lessening the honor of the rest of the parsha. Rav Eliyashiv holds that even in a place where most of the congregation stands one should still remain seated and does not have to worry about lo ...


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