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20

Yes, the painting is based on a popular picture of the Chofetz Chaim, which can be seen in The Schwadron Collection of the National Library of Israel (Jerusalem). The archive lists the picture as following: A photo portrait of Rabbi Israel Meir Cohen ("Chafetz Chaim"): printed silver, black and white, 7X12 cm. Portfolio also includes a copy of this ...


13

Click here to see this video that has been making the rounds on Jewish sites recently has a short scene of the Chafetz Chaim. Here are some screen caps:


13

The discussion is in the Talmud Sanhedrin 22a. The background is the disagreement among the Rabbis if the Torah was originally in Ivri or Ashuri. The Talmud says that according to the view that it was in Ivri, Ashuri script was first seen when the Angel wrote it on the wall, thus the Jews were not familiar with it - this is why they couldn't read it. ...


10

Per Torah.org Contemporary poskim debate whether taking a photograph of the sun or the moon is similar to drawing a flat image. Several rule stringently on this issue. There is an Igros Moshe Orach Chaim 5 - 9:6 that discusses this, however I am not able to find it online. Minchas Yitzchok 10:72 seems to prohibit it, however says it may be permitted ...


10

Iggros Moshe Even Haezer 1:69 applies the prohibition of seeing immodestly dressed women/men to seeing inappropriate behavior, with the reasoning that the problem is the thought process it instigates. Based on this logic he applies it to images in films, and even reading about inappropriate activity in books. So if these drawn images conjure up ...


9

The Rambam ruled in Hilkhos A.Z. 3:18 אסור לצור דמות חמה ולבנה כוכבים ומזלות ומלאכים, שנאמר "לא תעשון, איתי" (שמות כ,יט)--לא תעשון כדמות שמשין המשמשין לפניי במרום, ואפילו על הלוח. it is forbidden to fashion the likeness of the sun, the moon, the stars, the constellations, or the angels, as it is said (Ex. 20:19): "Do not make with Me [gods of silver.....


8

When Tzivos Hashem was founded, the Lubavitcher Rebbe asked Michel Shwartz to draw a logo for it. In its first draft, he included a picture of the sun and the moon (I've seen a copy a while ago. The sun was (IIRC) a full circle inside the red part of the Tzaddik and a (waxing/waning crescent) moon inside the blue part). The Rebbe told him to remove the moon ...


7

OK, I may have enough of an idea to offer an answer. I think the panel in the upper right is supposed to say כינור שפילט, like "harpist" or something in Yiddish. The upper middle seems to say something about a harp. The upper left says מאנדלן, Yiddish for almonds. I think the lower right might be א ליד, "a song." The lower middle says "baa..." I don't know ...


7

No. I don't have any sources but one can definitely see pictures of uncovered hair of brides in wedding photos posted proudly in the homes of great rabbis.


7

Yes, both R. Chaim Kanievsky and R. Dovid Feinstein have expressed opposition towards this practice, because one can't get to know a picture. See here.


6

A friend of mine is a friend of the Eliyashiv family. He spoke to Rabbi Binyamin Eliyashiv, who said that only two portraits hung in the apartment -- one of the Rav's grandfather, the Lashem, zt'l, and the other of his father-in-law, Rabbi Aryeh Levin, zt'l. My contact did not show the video to Rabbi Binyamin, but he did show it to rabbaim at Teferes ...


6

Rabbi Oshinski in his sefer Hilchos Aveilus (Perek 3:24) he writes (bringing the Zichron Eliyahu and the Pnei Baruch) that mirrors are covered and some hold that pictures are covered as well. He does note from others that covering picture may only be an issue when people are praying the shmoneh esrei. Text of sefer:


5

Making a permanent visual record is generally considered a form of "writing"; this includes film photography. From http://www.yutorah.com/_materials/Source_Sheet-510279.pdf : ר' יצחק וויס, שו"ת מנחת יצחק חלק ג סימן כ בתשו' קרן לדוד שם, כתב בפשיטות לענין המצייר צורה על ידי פאטאגראפיע דחייב משום תולדה דכותב Minchat Yitzchak (Responsa of R. ...


5

The Nitei Gavriel wrote a letter to the Lubavitcher Rebbe about publishing the pictures of the Rebbetzin, and the Lubavitcher Rebbe's response (in bold): ב"ה, י"א אדר [תשמ"ח] לכבוד כ"ק אדמו"ר הגה"ק שליט"א באתי להעיר אודות שיצא לאור ספר אמנו "המלכה" בודאי הבחין בהפשוט גם בלא הסתכלות כלל - אשר במהדורא אחרת הוסיפו בלי צבעים תמונה מהרבנית ע"ה ולפענ"ד אינו ...


5

First of all, it should be clarified that rasha means wicked person (technically just wicked, but it is a substantive ). And asur (assur) means forbidden. As Rabbi Yochanan says (Megillah 28a), it is forbidden for a man to gaze at the "tzelem demus" of a wicked man... Tzelem means image, and demus means likeness. Rabbi Yehoshua ben Korchah said that he ...


5

From Halachipedia: Many poskim permit walking in an area where the surveillance cameras will capture a person’s image as long as he does not intend to be recorded.¹ Waving at a camera cannot be taken as unintentional. 1.Rabbi Mordechai Willig (“Halacha Engages Modernity Part 8,” min 48-49) agrees that it is permitted to walk in an area where there is a ...


5

In the Artscroll Schottenstein edition of Niddah, I found one diagram of the halachic anatomy as understood by Rashi, in footnote 5 on page 17b1 (mouseover to view): See the rest of the notes there for context and explanation. As it happens, this chapter was elucidated by one of my high school rabbeim, R' Moshe Zev Einhorn.


4

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/912361/jewish/Chapter-Three.htm Halacha 10: It is forbidden to make decorative images of the human form alone. Therefore, it is forbidden to make human images with wood, cement, or stone. This [prohibition] applies when the image is protruding - for example, images and sculptures made in a hallway and the ...


4

A photograph can be considered an idol if there's someone who's worshipped it as one, same as most anything else. If it was made by a (halachically non-Jewish) religionist as an idol of his religion's, it's considered such even before it's worshipped (Shulchan Aruch, YD 139:1). Therefore, certain pictures should be assumed to be idols absent knowledge to the ...


4

Shulchan Aruch HaRav writes (O.C. 307:30) (quoting Shulchan Aruch O.C. 307:16): ובדברי חשק יש עוד איסור אפילו כתובים בלשון הקודש שמגרה יצר הרע בעצמו ומי שחיברן ומי שהעתיקן ואין צריך לומר המדפיסן הם בכלל מחטיאי הרבים In arousing literature there is another prohibition [besides issues of reading them on Shabbos] even if they are written in Hebrew [...


4

Painting of the Rambam; not earlier than 15th century (i.e. unreliable) see here. Statue of Mahral; by sculptor Ladislav Šaloun according to here (i.e. unreliable). Painting of the Gra possibly authentic as it is relatively contemporary see here. See however here that the popular picture is inauthentic, but that there is an authentic picture of him: For a ...


4

To summarize from Yishai's answer, the Talmud says there was something funny about the way it was written; "in columns" is one possible interpretation. Assuming Manasseh ben Israel gave Rembrandt a sketch of what the letters should look like, I'd find it far more likely that Rembrandt was faithful to the sketch he was given (i.e. it was in columns) than that ...


4

There is a long, long history of decorated curtains/parochets in front of arons/arks. The first one I found in Tanach was in the original Mishkan, according to Shemot/Exodus 26:31 - 33, dividing the original Ark's "most holy" area from the just plain "holy" area in front of it. It was multicolored and had cherubim on it. The second one mentioned was the ...


4

I found this Shiviti after a quick Google Images search.


4

Kaddish is the way in which the Hashem's radiance, partially diminshed through the passing of the departed, is restored. Kaddish is for the Living Remarkably, the Mourner's Kaddish does not mention death, nor make any reference to the deceased. It is directed, instead, at the living. The Kaddish affirms G‑d's justice and speaks of the value of ...


3

You asked: What are the opinions of Poskim (contemporary or otherwise) regarding the propriety of publishing such pictures, and their reasons? The newspapers you mention have a Rabbinic Counsel of sorts, but it seems that the "no female pictures" comes from a Marketing Perspective. The average audience they target will not stop buying simply because ...


3

The big question is borer and it is a machloket (debate) whether it applies to large objects. The Aruch HaShulchan Siman 319:8-9 holds that sorting large objects like clothes and silverware is not an issue of borer and completely permitted. The Shmirat Shabbat kHilchata disagrees and prohibits sorting large objects. (for example see Chapter 3 Borer-89) ...


3

The Aruch Hashulchan - O"C 90:28 says that it's best not to have any pictures in a room dedicated to praying. He is opposed to pictures of animals and birds - and all the more so people - in prayer locations. If one must decorate the prayer room the decorations should be higher than the height of an average person. Especially problematic are pictures (...


3

The relevant quote from Shulchan Aruch Harav is as follows (my own translation): בגדים המצויירים שתולים בכותלי בית הכנסת לנוי אע"פ שמן הדין אין בהם משום חציצה אין נכון להתפלל כנגדם כדי שלא יהא מביט בציורם ולא יכוין בתפלתו ואם יקרה לו להתפלל נגדם יעצים עיניו וגם כשמציירים כותלי בית הכנסת נכון שלא לצייר ציורים נגד פניו של אדם אלא למעלה מקומת איש. ...


3

Rabbi Eliezer Melamed says it is permitted. It is permissible to decorate the parochet (curtain) and the aron kodesh in the accepted manner, for people are accustomed to the decorations on them and the artwork does not distract them from praying.


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