5

This is technically an answer (it's a contemporary source), but... The Yalkut Reuven here is quoting directly from שלשלת הקבלה. The original source can be found here (bottom third of the page). The problem is that the if you look at the beginning of the paragraph, it's prefaced with the follow disclaimer: "האומות אומרים" That is, שלשלת הקבלה is ...


4

Looking through a list of all of the occurrences of Melech in the Torah (really Tanach), here two possibilities: לֹֽא־הִבִּ֥יט אָ֙וֶן֙ בְּיַעֲקֹ֔ב וְלֹא־רָאָ֥ה עָמָ֖ל בְּיִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל י״י֤ אֱלֹהָיו֙ עִמּ֔וֹ וּתְרוּעַ֥ת מֶ֖לֶךְ בּֽוֹ׃ He has not seen iniquity in Jacob. Neither has he seen perverseness in Israel. Hashem his God is with him. The shout of a ...


4

As you noted in your comment, at Wiktionary.org, וַיֹּאמַר is the pausal form of וַיֹּאמֶר. In use in the bible, generally coming off of a previous introductory verb, it seems to be more reasonably translated as "saying:" akin to "לאמר" (or "and said:") rather than as "And he said..." or "He said...". See, e.g., Job 1:7 in which וַיֹּאמַר may be ...


4

A search using Sefaria seems to yield 110 instances of "נא" distributed in 97 verses in the Pentateuch ("נא" appears more than once in several verses, such as Genesis 47:29) including 64 verses in Genesis, 13 verses in Exodus (not including 12:9 where the meaning is "raw", regarding the paschal offering), 18 verses in Numbers, and two verses in Deuteronomy. ...


3

It is mentioned in the Talmud. Gitin 60a: רבה ורב יוסף דאמרי תרוייהו אין קוראין בחומשין בבית הכנסת משום כבוד צבור Rabba and Rav Yosef both say: One does not read from ḥumashim in the synagogue out of respect for the community. (Sefaria Translation) Likewise in Rambam Hilchos Sefer Torah 10: נִמְצֵאתָ לָמֵד שֶׁעֶשְׂרים דְּבָרִים הֵן שֶׁבְּכָל ...


3

I now use the Chorev Tikkun and with the Simanim Tikkun on the side. Benefits of the Chorev: Uses the actual Breuer text. Distinguishes shva nah/nach and kamatz katan. The side of the page without trop looks exactly like the sefer torah - the Simanim has random highlights and other markings on the "torah" side which I find distracting. Both sides of the ...


3

According to this Wikipedia article: https://he.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/פירוש_רש%22י_לתורה (Under ״מפרשי רש׳י) The writer of ikar siftei Chachamim is anonymous, but it was first printed in Vilna (widow and brothers Romm) printing press in 5635 (1874/ 1875).


2

I think the set of chumashim ‘Torat Haim’ has the most commentaries on the page, specifically classical ones critically edited. They include: R. Saadia Gaon Rabbeinu Hananel Rashi R. Dovid Kimhi Ibn Ezra Rashbam Hizkuni Ramban R. Meir of Rothenburg R. Ovadiah of Seforno Sefer Ha’Hinuch


2

No, the Torah Codes have no merit. There are two core issues: 1) Statistical Improbability - On the surface it does seem to be highly improbable to find hidden "codes" through the use of Equidistant Letter Sequencing" (ELS). The issues is that these same "miraculous finds" have been duplicated using Moby Dick. 2) ELS Coding only works if the text is 100% ...


1

It was asked in a similar question, and I suggested there Dovi's online Chumash, which seems to be a really good quality one with the kamatz katan marked.


1

Rashi means exactly as he says:do not inquire of the future. Science and natural law do not tell us of the future, they are extrapolations of the present, and that's allowed.


1

Heard from רב פדר... A person by nature is insecure about the future. It is scary. Who knows what will happen? He gets worried. He has great fears. So what does he do? He often seeks out a certain method to get a sneak peak at the future. He seeks out a fortune teller or the stars to tell the future. But the point is that those concerns about the ...


1

Perhaps mentioning Moshe Rabainu arouses his merit or kvyachol reminds HKBH of his tefilos after the chet haeigel?


1

The Sifra can be found on Sefaria or HebrewBooks.org. While these aren't physical copies-- as @PopularismIsn'tRight notes in a comment-- you can have a physical copy printed via using PublishYourSefer.


1

From Rambam's Iggeret Techiat Hameitim: Now for the answer to the second problem, which is why is the Resurrection not mentioned in the Torah? This is my reply. You must realize that, as is well known, we do not believe that the Torah comes from Moses. No, it is in its entirety the word of the Lord. The problem then becomes a quest of God's wisdom in ...


1

The 1861 Warsaw edition has 32 commentaries. It would appear that these are not just on the Torah proper and also that any Mikraot Gedolot with 32 peirushim are based on the this edition. מקראות גדולות עם ל"ב פירושים : הלא המה: תרגום אונקלוס, תרגום ירושלמי, תרגום למגלות , תרגום שני לאסתר עם באור [מאת ר’ חיים פייבל ב"ר דוד זכריה] , פירש"י שלם עם המראה ...


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