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The Lubavitcher Rebbe said that the custom among Lubavitch was to cut the Peos. He said that there are a few reasons, one of which is to avoid mixing the two types of light from the 13 strands of the beard. He also mentioned that the Arizal used to cut his Peos (as is written in the Shaarei Hamitzvos and Taamei Hamitzvos parshas Kedoshim).


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It depends. If you mean that until now you have been completely shaving them like a crew cut, then letting them grow a bit should be fine, no one would really notice a major change. (Click here for a full explanation on Peyos) If you mean to grow them out long until they curl around your ears or even longer, well i will tell you what my rebbe told me - "It'...


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In terms of using a #1 guard: The Rambam (Hilchos Parah Adumah 1:4) rules that a completely red cow that has two white or black hairs would not have the status of a Parah Adumah. If however, the hairs are so short that one would not be able to grab them with tweezers the hair is considered to not be there at all. Apparently the Rambam has another ...


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There is a poster available online. If you will keep it in the barber shop they promise to send it to you a free copy. EDIT The website seems down. There is a backup poster on the Web Archive


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To answer your question: It's been said in the name of Reb Chaim Kanievsky that one should not hide one's Peyot behind one's ears, but he never says to cut them. There are plenty well respected Rabbis who hide their Peyot behind their ears, and others who have trimmed Peyot . Just to put this in context, let's go back to basics - using classic sources. ...


7

While the Rosh (Makkot 3:2) rules that the prohibition of cutting the peyot applies even to cutting them short with a scissors, the Rambam (Avoda Zara 12:6) rules that the prohibition is equivalent to that of the shaving the beard which is only prohibited with a razor. The Shulchan Aruch (YD 181:3) rules: אינו חייב אלא בתער. ויש אוסרים במספרים כעין תער, ...


7

The Sefer M'rafsin Igra V'yakel pg. 199 asks this question. Rav Moshe Brim and Rav Yair Yedidya Pacha answer and explain the reasoning of the mitzvah. They explain the issur of not leaving over a corner comes from the mitzvah of leaving over for the poor. Therefore if one would leave over four little corners or one big corner there would be no difference, as ...


6

My hair is curly and i could grow peyoth all day long if i wanted to. But for those who can't, then there a few things one can do, but none of them sound especially pious or manly. Once your peyoth get long enough you can try the following: Buy a curling iron and get curlers. When you get out of the shower, wrap/wind your peyoth around your finger then pin ...


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If you give them time and don't allow them to be cut, they'll be long. (How much time is necessary depends on how long you want them to be, of course. A tip of my hat to Isaac Moses for this link to Wikipedia, which says human hair typically grows six inches (fifteen cm) in a year.) If you have a medical condition that prevents your hair from growing, ...


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Makkot 20b: אחד המקיף ואחד הניקף לוקה both the one who rounds and the one who is rounded are lashed The Gemara is then troubled how someone who is rounded is lashed and gives a few possible answers (he leaned in to assist in the rounding, he rounds himself, or it's the opinion that prohibitions without actions get lashes) but the important thing here ...


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I found the source I was looking for ,it is from the Chofetz Chaim in his Kuntres Tiferes Adam (on the issur of shaving ). He writes that he remembers that when a Jew took a vow he would do so with his beard and payos.


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It seems no one has discussed how long the hair actually needs to be. The Mishna in Niddah 6:12 states שתי שערות האמורות בפרה ובנגעים והאמורות בכל מקום כדי לכוף ראשן לעיקרן דברי רבי ישמעאל ר"א אומר כדי לקרוץ בציפורן ר"ע אומר כדי שיהו ניטלות בזוג The [length of the] two hairs regarding the Red Heifer, the Tzara'at affliction, and in all places is enough ...


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There is an interesting Wikipedia article describing different payot styles. "As Yishai mentioned, above, "aruf" means "up" so this refers to payot that are behind the ear vs. hanging down. It could be either tied up and put under the kippah or curled around the ear. According to the wiki article this is considered the common "Litvish" / yeshivish style. ...


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It means curled/twisted up and stuck behind your ears. I have geknipte peyos.


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If I recall, R. Moshe Feinstein is cited in Megged Giv'os Olam as holding that any hair that does not grow in until the onset of puberty may be shaved. I heard this from Rabbi Heineman as well.


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Olas Yitzchak 292 says it is known from the times of the Rambam even though the Rambam did not hold it was necessary. He brings in the name of the Sefer Shaar HaMitzvos - Rabbi Chaim Vital - Parshas Kedoshim in the name of the Arizal. Ben Ish Chai in his Sefer Ben Ish Chayil says that when Mordechai was Muchtar Binimuso it means long Paiyos.


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Kiddushin 35b addresses this: חוץ מבל תקיף ובל תשחית כו': בשלמא בל תטמא למתים דכתיב (ויקרא כא, א) אמור אל הכהנים בני אהרן בני אהרן ולא בנות אהרן אלא בל תקיף ובל תשחית מנלן § The Gemara asks: Granted, a woman of priestly lineage is not obligated in the mitzva of: Do not contract ritual impurity from a corpse, as it is written: “Speak to the priests, the sons ...


3

I found this interesting regarding the curling of the payos. A man shouldn't use curlers. Rather, if you want to curl your payos, use your finger. For the proper method to do this, we asked a Rabbi with long payos. He wrote us the following: "Wet the payos and comb them out horizontally across the forehead. Then, take the forefinger of the hand of ...


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Taken from an article by Rabbi Aryeh Lebowitz: The Rambam (Avoda Zara 12:6) rules that one is only prohibited from removing peyos with a razor. Cutting peyos off with a scissor that provides a cut as short as a razor is completely acceptable. (The Darchei Teshuva (181:2) writes, based on the Sefer Hachinuch, that one is merely exempt from punishment, but ...


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Years ago, I was told that the Chabad Chasdidim wear short peyos because there had been, at one time, a law in Russia forbidding peyos. They then started wearing short peyos, which they continued wearing since that time.


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I'm not sure about Rav Ben-Tzion Abba Shaul (I'd be very interested in hearing if anyone knows), but Rav Menashe Klein (Mishneh Halachos 7:121) quotes from R. Chaim Zvi Manheimer that people who grow their payos long and hide them behind their ears do look as if they're embarassed that they're performing a mitzvah, and that's a problem. Personally, I would ...


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It seems from the Tshuvos HaRambam 244 that one does not need to grow their payos long and in fact the Rambam did not grow his long.However in this tshuvah it seems the masses had such an idea of growing them long. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=1731&st=&pgnum=170 The Ben Ish Chai in his drashos on parshas zachor brings a proof from ...


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Per Rabbi Shraga Simmons at About.com: Question: Why do male Chasidic Jews have the long side curls in their hair? Answer: The Torah says, "You shall not round off the peyos of your head" (Leviticus 19:27). The word peyos refers to sideburns -- i.e. the hair in front of the ears that extends to underneath the cheekbone which is level with the ...


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Just to clarify that tucking peyos behind your ear does NOT make your hairline look circular, as you postulate: Someone who has peyos but tucks them behind the ears might also be thought to have a circular hairline. The peyos area is roughly a triangle area as you can see here in the black area. ושיעור הפאה הוא מכנגד שער שעל פדחתו ועד למטה מן האוזן ...


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All sources from Shulchan Aruch - Yoreh De'ah - 181 Regarding the shaver in the Payos area: ג: אֵינוֹ חַיָּב אֶלָּא בְּתַעַר. וְיֵשׁ אוֹסְרִים בְּמִסְפָּרַיִם (ב) כְּעֵין תַּעַר, וְיֵשׁ לָחוּשׁ לְדִבְרֵיהֶם. ‏ באר היטב (ב) כעין. שגוזז במספרים סמוך לבשר כעין תער. ש''ך: ‏ As Matt pointed out, it's a matter of dispute. The Shulchan Aruch ...


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If you are working toward an Orthodox conversion, then you are also working with an Orthodox Rav and Beit Din. Your first source for what you should do prior to your conversion should come from them. That said, prior to your actual conversion, according to halacha, you have the legal status of being a non-Jew. You are not commanded to keep any of the 613 ...


2

If I were to break down this question to its bare essentials, I would ask: Does the rabbi make the Jew, or does the Jew make the rabbi? In other words, if we see our life as a journey in which we try to move spiritually upon our current plane and attempt to raise ourselves to new levels, can it be that the rabbi who started us on our path is the one with ...


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See Rabbi Leibowitz's article section E here The Shulchan Aruch writes they need to go down to the bottom of the ear. Rabbis Zilber and Arik maintain this does not include the earlobe as part of the ear. Rabbis Frimmer and Belsky maintain any clear differentiation between hair types, I.e. color or texture, is enough to recognize where peyos of the head ...


2

As far as I know there is no requirement that says you have to keep your payoth 'looking good.' But if that is priority to you then there are two different options. If one has naturally curly hair that allows peyoth to develop naturally when drying, then on yom tov one may simply wet his hair in the morning when he gets up. For everything else, one should ...


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