10

Rashi to Vayikra 16:8 says Azazel is not a person: Azazel: This is a strong and hard mountain, [with] a high cliff, as the Scripture says [in describing Azazel] (verse 22 below),“a precipitous land (אֶרֶץ גְּזֵרָה),” meaning a cut-off land [i.e., a sheer drop]. — [Torath Kohanim 16:28; Yoma 67b]


8

Mishnah Berurah 621:2 quotes this idea in the name of the Zohar. (I believe the relevant piece of Zohar is to be found in Vol. III 57b.)


7

According to the "Klei Yakar" (Vayikra 17-13): The main reason for the Mitzvah of "Kisui Ha'Dam" is to make a distinction that one should not come to eat blood - "Dam Ha'Nefesh" (violating the prohibition of eating blood). but for Beheimot there is no such need, because they are sacrificed on the Mizbeach, and that's already a sign (and a reminder) that the ...


6

To quote Rashi: the nakedness of your father: This [refers to] your father’s wife. [But how do we know this?] Perhaps it is only to be interpreted literally [as an admonition against relations with one’s father, in addition to the general admonition against pederasty]. [The answer is:] It says here, “The nakedness of your father,” and it says further, “...


5

The word נפש is not limited to mean strictly "souls." It often means something along the lines of "life force" or "being." When someone kills someone else, the Torah refers to it as having struck the נפש - as in אדרוש את נפש האדם of Bereishit 9, or מכה נפש of Bamidbar 35, or רצחו נפש of Devarim 22. נפש תחת נפש (Vayikra 24) seems to mean "a life for a life....


5

The phrase means literally "the lying of a man" and is euphemistic for intimate relations as performed by a man, which is how it is generally translated in the verses (Numbers 31:17-18) you cite: וְעַתָּ֕ה הִרְג֥וּ כָל־זָכָ֖ר בַּטָּ֑ף וְכָל־אִשָּׁ֗ה יֹדַ֥עַת אִ֛ישׁ לְמִשְׁכַּ֥ב זָכָ֖ר הֲרֹֽגוּ׃ Now, therefore, slay every male among the children, and ...


5

Ramban is his discourse "Torat Hashem Temima" (here citing Galen too in the footnote, or Kitvei Ramban ed. Chavel, p. 167) repeated this idea in the name of Aristotle. The source for Aristotle's observation is in his book on dreams (here is a link to the Greek and English trans.) If a woman chances during her menstrual period to look into a highly ...


5

The Chinuch explains that the blood domestic animals is offered on the altar so cannot be covered, and God didn't trouble us to distinguish in this way between animals offered on the altar and animals slaughtered privately. Yes, birds are also offered on the altar, but very few, so we cover their blood and wild animals'.


4

Adapting from here: Panim Yafos (by the Baal Hahaflaah) and Pnei Dovid (by the Chida): to teach us that (according to Tosafos) even with arayos, where there's no maaseh, יהרג ואל יעבור doesn't apply. Meshech Chochmah: to teach us that (according to the Shach's understanding of the Rambam) יהרג ואל יעבור doesn't apply to אביזרייהו דעריות, which is the ...


4

According to the Mishna (Yoma 8:1), Yom Hakkippurim is forbidden in eating, drinking, washing, anointing, wearing shoes, and marital relations. The Gemara (76b) tries to derive how each of these prohibitions is called "affliction" (עינוי). If the word וצמתם were used, it would not have expressed any of the prohibitions besides eating and drinking. This ...


4

I believe the short-and-sweet explanation is that the Haftorah of Acharei includes the gist of the Haftorah of Kedoshim. Thank you Fred, for pointing to the Mordechai, Megillah 831 as well as the Mishna Brurah 428.26. The Haftorah for Kedoshim refers to "the sinning city", and is just a litany of its faults. We basically make that a closet Haftorah as ...


4

In Pliny the Elder's Natural History, he records such something similar: "Her very look, even, will dim the brightness of mirrors, blunt the edge of steel, and take away the polish from ivory. A swarm of bees, if looked upon by her, will die immediately; brass and iron will instantly become rusty, and emit an offensive odor." Thus we see a claim of an ...


3

Simple answer is yes there is a very good reason, though sorry, it's somewhat graphic. "Mishkevei isha" (plural) refers to vaginal and anal; only one of those applies to males. This is in fact the Talmud's source that the same punishment would apply, if a woman was a prohibited relation, for either type of activity.


3

A talmid of R' Noach Weinberg told me that R' Noach used to often say a pshat in that. The Torah is saying, even if you are going to stoop to homosexuality, but not your father. And the lesson is, just because you have stooped pretty low, don't throw everything away.


3

It is certainly minhag dependent, but not necessarily Ashkenazi and Sefardi dependent, rather it may fall along different lines. Within Ashkenazim you will see it both ways. The Lubavitcher Rebbe says (Likkutei Sichos 5 p. 57 second paragraph of note 2) that from Rashi on Sota 40b it seems that Achrei Mos is the name of the sedra, so Rashi needs to clarify ...


3

Although Rashi (Chulin 16) cites this verse as support for the view that non-sacrifical meat was prohibited to Jews at that time, that view is not accepted as halacha: in fact we hold that they could and did eat non-sacrifical meat at that time. Thus, I have no reason to think that will change if we ever have manna again.


3

The Ramban on Leviticus 20:5 addresses the question. He says you have to answer differently based on the machloket in the gemara on what Molech was. But by simple understanding that it was an idol, the prohibition comes to teach us that you can't serve another idol (not Molech) by passing your child through fire. Even though that was not the way that ...


2

The approach given in an Ask Moses article is derived from the previous Lubavitcher Rebbe zt”l. I extract some portions below which indicate that we have to be on the right spiritual level to eat meat. (But then, it seems to imply that one can eat it frequently). Necessity vs. Luxury The human being cannot live without the vegetable and mineral ...


2

Natan Slifkin, citing Ibn Ezra, writes as follows: Other evidence regarding Ibn Ezra’s position relates to the goat that is sent to Azazel. In his commentary on this topic, Ibn Ezra writes as follows: Now if you can understand the secret of the word after Azazel, you will know its secret and the secret of its name, since it has parallels ...


1

It seems that According to Rabeinu Bacheye quoting Rashi, that Initially Hashem forbade Adam to eat slaughtered animals. Hashem only later on allowed slaughtered animals for either the Temple service when slaughterred as commanded inside the Beth Hamikdash, or for regular consumption. So if someone would consecrate an animal for G-d and then "spill/waste its ...


1

The gemara discusses at length in Masechet Yoma 74b the commandment of "suffering" ועניתם.The gemera asks how do we know the Torah didn't mean that one should sit in the sun all day! The gemara then enumerates a few baraytot that derive this law in various ways using exegesis. Some are based on the juxtaposition of this law with the prohibition against ...


1

While I have not seen a reference to man returning, the halachos of meat would still not apply even if the man did return. Note also that the man only fell when Bnei Yisrael were camped around the mishkan in the desert. When Mashiach comes, we will be living in all of Eretz Yisrael and not in the immediate vicinity of the Bais Hamikdash. Rav Hirsch on verse ...


1

The "stranger" happens to mean a convert, not a non-Jew.


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