13

Chelev (the word translated as "fat" in the quoted verse) in Halacha refers to certain fats which in a sacrifice are offered on the altar and in regular meat are forbidden to be eaten, while Shuman refers to other fats which are completely permitted. A list of which fats on which body parts are in which category is something which pretty much can only be ...


6

Slide 28 of this presentation quotes Rabbi Avraham Fischer of the OU: Chelev refers to the outer layer of fat called suet. The prohibited chelev is the abdominal fat on the stomach, kidney, and flank. It can be peeled away like a skin. The rest of the fat which is permissible is called shuman. Chelev or Suet is used in occasional cooking (non kosher, ...


6

Beautiful question! In fact, Rav Schwab asks it in his sefer in Chumash! As Yisroel Reisman writes, "Rav Schwab (in Mayan Beis Hashoeva page # 242) explains, when we say not to bring a Korban that is stolen, the point is not the negative that something that is stolen is not appropriate for a Korban. That you indeed cannot learn from Adam. The point is that a ...


6

Leviticus Rabbah 7:1 says that Gd was angry with Aaron because he demonstrated to the Israelites that their idol was worthless when they brought a sacrifice to the golden calf, making them intentional sinners instead of unintentional sinners. A part of his punishment was being mentioned only by way of his sons, (ie. 'the sons of Aaron shall...'), to fulfil ...


5

R' Samson Raphael Hirsh's Commentary on some of the verses you cite provides extensive treatments of particular lessons to be derived from each kind of blood-sprinking or -pouring, starting with seven pages on the one introduced in Vayikra 1:5. My understanding, after looking through some of these for general ideas about the meaning of blood-sprinkling, is ...


5

My rav gave a drasha during Yom Kippur related to the expression בוחן כליות which means, literally "checks the kidneys". The adrenal glands are located on top of each kidney. Adrenaline is one of several hormones that increase or decrease excitement. The metaphor of בוחן כליות is that G-d is checking how excited you are in performing mitzvot. Other than ...


5

Rashi in Menachos 21a ד"ה דם שבישלו says that salting blood is like cooking it, based on the rule of מליח כרותח, that salting is like boiling. The Ran in Avodah Zarah (38b in dapei haRif, ד"ה גרסינן) also seems to contemplate that salting on Shabbos would be considered cooking (arguing with the Ramban). Similarly, the Tzlach (Pesachim 74a ד"ה ואמרתי) says ...


4

The Lubavitcher Rebbe writes in Likutei Sichot concerning the small alef in Vayikra: He called to Moses: The alef of the word for "He called" (ויקרא), the first word in the Book of Leviticus, is written smaller than usual, alluding to Moses' humility even in the face of his own greatness and his selection by God for his exalter role in human ...


4

Haamek Davar notes that the sound of God's voice didn't leave the tent and says that the verse can thus be explained as follows: [An angel] called Moshe and [after Moshe entered the tent] God spoke to him….


3

Intuitively, I expect that your first source is referring to a class of animals that's generally worshipped by a society, while your second source is referring to a particular animal that's been worshipped by individual worshippers.


3

There are indeed many more. This blog post does a nice job of summarizing some of them, and the sources brought below can be found there. Sefer Chasidim - Just as the world is "held up" in the merit of the Korbanos, it is also "held up" by the Torah of young Children. Keli Yakar suggests that the small Aleph in the word Vayikra hints to us to do this. ...


3

The Sefer HaChinuch writes regarding the prohibition of removing the head of the Chatas Haof (Mitzva 124) the folllowing: (Source from Sefaria.org) וענין המליקה והאזהרה שלא יבדיל גם זה מפרטי הקרבן הוא. ואך אמנה אשר לא יחוש להוציא כל רוחו יוכל להשיב כי אולי בדבר המליקה הנעשית ביד הכהן בחטאת העוף, שהוא קרבן של עני, רמז שימהר כל אדם בתכלית המהירות צרכו של עני, ...


3

Baal Haturim: א' דויקרא זעירא שמשה לא רצה לכתוב אלא ויקר כדרך שנא' בבלעם כאלו לא נראה לו השם אלא במקרה ואמר לו הקב''ה לכתוב גם באל''ף וכתבה קטנה.‏ loose translation: Moses wanted to write it without an aleph to hide, [out of humility,] the fact that G-d called him [warmly, with affection and love,] contrarily to the manner in which He called non ...


3

The Talmud (Yoma 45a) quotes a baraita as interpreting this "placing of fire" to mean starting the fire by kindling little wood chips1: רבי יוסי הצתת אליתא מנא ליה נפקא ליה מהיכא דנפקא ליה לרבי שמעון דתניא (ויקרא א, ז) ונתנו בני אהרן הכהן אש על המזבח לימד על הצתת אליתא שלא תהא אלא בכהן כשר ובכלי שרת דברי ר' יהודה אמר לו רבי שמעון וכי תעלה על דעתך ...


2

This question contains two incorrect assumptions. One incorrect assumption is that a guilt offering (korban asham) is less serious than a sin offering (korban chatas). The Ramban 5:15 indicates that the opposite is true, and the Rama (O.C. 603:1) actually quotes as accepted halakha: one must expend greater effort in repenting from a sin that he might have ...


2

B"H Well after all it did cause the entire concept of fatality throughout the entire world, so I guess it wasn't so healthy... But in reality Adam wasn't commanded regarding the laws of arleh, since that's only a commandment for the nation of Yisroyrayl after the giving of the Torah etc.... like it says right before that "from all of the trees of ...


2

This is not a discrepancy. The statement in Rei 12:27 And you shall make your burnt offerings the flesh and the blood upon the altar of the Lord, your God, and the blood of your sacrifices shall be poured upon the altar of the Lord, your God, and you shall eat the flesh. is a general case. Rav Isaac Levy, Rabbi Shimson Refael Hirsch's grandson (who ...


2

Rabbi Shmuel David Luzzato, more commonly known by the acronym "Shadal," wrote the following concerning the small alef: .(ויקרא: לענין א' זעירא עיין מה שכתבתי על קצתי בחיי (בראשית כ"ז מ"ו So now we go and check his commentary on Bereshit 27:46, like he tells us to, and here it is: ותאמר רבקה אל יצחק קצתי בחיי: הקו"ף זערה, נ"ל כי היה מנהג הסופרים בימי ...


1

In Guide for the Perplexed 3:26 Rambam writes: You ask why must a lamb be sacrificed and not a ram? but the same question would be asked, why a ram had been commanded instead of a lamb, so long as one particular kind is required. The same is to be said as to the question why were seven lambs sacrificed and not eight; the same question might have ...


1

A classic explanation is, because when a man knows that he faulted, he would regret more than a man that just doubts. So in case of a known sin, the qorban is just a lamb, instead of a ram for a "not-sure" case.


1

When Hashem called to Moshe, that was a command to enter the mishkan and speak to Hashem. Even Moshe Rabbeinu could not enter unless he was first invited into the Presence of Hashem. As an example we see The Mishkan And The Mikdash cites R’ Yehuda Herzl Henkin shlita (a posek and educator in Israel) as asking Why does the Book of Shmot end this way? We ...


1

According to Midrash Osiyos Ktanos is to teach us that HKBH reveals His shehina partially to other nations but not to Yisroel. See the way ויקרא is used with Bilam (without alef) in balak 23:4 but ויקרא (with alef) is used for Yisroel. The question then is, the midrash says, why is the alef here small? The answer is, to differentiate between the way Hashem ...


1

The Ramban in Sefer Ha-Mitzvos (shoresh 1, quoted by R. Elchanan Wasserman in Kuntres Divrei Sofrim), and many other sources, indicate that one who knows the rulings of the Sanhedrin to be incorrect may be stringent upon himself. This would not make him a zaken mamrei, as to be a zaken mamrei one must teach others to follow his view against that of the ...


1

Probably the same standards used in Arachim (see 6th Perek) and codified by the Rambam in הלכות ערכים וחרמים פרק ג In a nutshell, we pay up his debts (as they have an earlier lien) and then we provide him with food for 30 days. He gets basic living conditions (roof, bed, Tefilin and weekday clothes) and a basic set of tools for his trade. We then sell his ...


1

There was no need to mention Who is calling Moshe, because we know this from the last psukim in Humash SHMOT. R. Joseph Bekhor Shor (12th cent.) wrote - "Because the [previous] book ends with “the Glory of the Lord filled the Tabernacle and Moses could not enter the Tent of Meeting…” it was necessary [for God] to call him and give him permission to enter. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible