17

I go through the math here. Admittedly I use a lot of very rough estimation. I caught some mistakes in my math in the video which I have edited here, as well as adding a section below regarding the contents of the Aron. It's important to note that according to R' Meir, the amos used are 6 tefachim each, while according to R' Yehudah, the amos used are 5 ...


9

“Mikdash” is a more generic term for a “holy place” or (following Rav S. R. Hirsch) a “sorce of holiness”. The Mishkan was the specific Mikdash built in the desert. (Note the same root SH-K-N in mishkan and v’shakhanti.) For your second question, God is not promising merely to dwell in the tent built for Him but to be an active Presence within the nation: “...


7

The Gemara (Eruvin 2A-3B) actually uses this verse to prove that a Mikdash is sometimes called a Mishkan. (Actually, that Gemara actually says that "Mikdash" and "Mishkan" are interchangeable terms). The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains that according to Rashi (the simple explanation of the text), one cannot say that "Veshanchanti Besocham" is a result of "Veasu ...


7

Asked and answered here. it seems quite likely that this is a later interpolation; it doesn't appear in early prints of Rashi. In several places, though, Rashi refers to לשון כנען, which was a popular term at the time for the Slavic languages (based on the equation of "Slav" with "slave" and the association of the latter with Canaan). These ...


6

Rabbi Chaim Kanievski (in Taamah Dkrah) deduces from the Gemarah in Menachot 89a [top of the page] that pure gold is not required when only the term 'זָהָב' is used (without 'טָהוֹר') and points out that only those items located in the Heichal (the Aron, Shulchan, Menorah, and Mizbach Haktores) were required to have pure gold. I think he may be implying that ...


6

ארז, which you translated as cedar, is actually the name of a group of 10 (or 4) different types of trees (see the gemara in R"H on .כג, and the gemara in B"B), one of which is שיטא, which apparently Artscroll translates as accacia.


6

R. Aryeh Kaplan (who was also a noted physicist) dealt with this precise question in his The Living Torah. On that word, which he translates as "copper," R. Kaplan comments: Or, 'bronze.' The Septuagint thus translates the word as xalkos which can denote copper or bronze, and the MeAm Lo'ez, also, translates it as alambre which is Spanish for copper or ...


4

My understanding has always been that argaman refers to Tyrian Purple, or at least a similar reddish-purplish dye, produced from murex shells. The archaeologist Zvi Koren has written about this and has found a fabric at Qumran of murex-dyed wool that he interprets as having been Tyrian purple. With regards to the hair: some scholars have suggested (and I ...


4

Well, presumably Rashi had a different version. The question is — and is asked by the Mizrachi and the Minchas Shay — that no extant m'sora agrees with him. They offer no answer.


4

Rav Yosef Bechor Shor to 25:31 states clearly that the word "Miksha" comes to exclude the possibility of using a mold, what is referred to by the Torah as "Yetzikah" (see, for example, Shemos 25:12). Based on similar-sounding interpretations by other Rishonim there, I would assume that this is accepted.


4

Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch explains (Exodus 25:29) that the bread was primarily designed to support the other pieces of bread. From this we can learn the importance of giving much of our own material wealth to others. This shape according to רבי חנינא whose tradition has the most to be said for it (See Menachoth 94b and תוספות ibid) was a flat surface ...


4

Not everybody agrees with Rashi. Abarbanel (as cited in the JPS Miqra'ot Gedolot English translation) says that the linen threads formed the warp and the colored yarns were used in the weft to make the designs. Gersonides adds that the design work involves calculating the number of threads that will produce the image when it's woven. That's not very clear;...


4

Rashash (Yoma 53, in part, in my own translation): It's difficult to understand why they didn't make another aron in the second temple. If it was because it's written "and put the testimony in the aron", implying that its main need is nothing but the testimony, isn't "and put the urim, etc., into the justice breastplate" also written about the breastplate?...


3

My understanding has always been that “the middle bar in the midst of the boards, which shall pass through from end to end” was horizontal as you can see in the picture from here. . Boys are constructing a model mishkan. The boy on the extreme left of the picture is inserting the middle bar into the boards. Also if you see hewikipedia there is a picture ...


3

Taken from R Aryeh Kaplan's translation of the Torah dark red (Ibn Ezra; Ibn Janach; Pesikta Rabathai 20:3, 86a). Argaman in Hebrew. Others state that it is similar to lake, a purplish red dye extracted from lac (Radak, Sherashim; Rambam on Kelayim 9:1; cf.Yad, Kley HaMikdash 8:13). Although the Septuagint translates argaman as porphura or porphoreus, ...


3

Rav Hirsch writes on that verse (Exodus 25:8 -- page 538 in the Shemos volume of this set), that the message of the Tabernacle is based on that verse: "ועשו לי מקדש ושכנתי בתוכם" -- "make for me a Mikdash, and I will dwell [שכן] in your midst." He writes that our mission ("ועשו לי מקדש," to build the Mikdash) results in ושכנתי בתוכם (the manifestation of the ...


3

If I understand correctly, you are referring to the brichim, the horizontal poles that were slipped through rings on the boards -- and through holes within the boards -- to hold them in place. The math is straightforward: There were 20 boards of 1.5 amos on the north and south, thus requiring the poles to span 30 amos (the top and bottom poles were 2 x 15 ...


3

Midrash Hagadol, (Terumah): אמר לו לא כשם שאתה סבור, אלא עשה אתה כשנברא העולם וכשנתחתם גופך כך עשה המשכן, וכך היה המשכן דומה לגופו של אדם ...And this is the reason why the mishkan resembles the world and the human body. במשכן היו הקרשים קבועין בתוך האדנים, ובגוף הצלעות קבועות בתוך החוליות, In the mishkan, there are planks fixed into the ...


2

Another answer is offered by Netziv (Shemos 25:6), who says that these specific things are mentioned here because they need to be specially purchased and are very expensive: ובזה נתיישב הא שמונה הכתוב ״שמן למאור בשמים לשמן המשחה ולקטורת הסמים״ בכלל מעשה המשכן יותר מחיטים לסולת המנחות או בהמות לקרבן תמידים, וכן מפורש במעשה המשכן שעשה בצלאל את לחם הפנים, וא״...


2

Copper is a pure element (Cu). Like gold it is very soft when pure and is really only fit for jewelry and small trinkets. Copper only became useable in the ancient world for weapons and other large solid things when it was turned into a sturdier alloy. An alloy of copper and other elements is called bronze. (Hence the Bronze Age) Brass is a specific alloy of ...


2

Meor L'Afeila - Rabbeinu Nesanel ben Yeshaya Parshas Teruma says that it is a light red color. וארגמן הוא הצבע האדום הממוזג בצהיבות Mechon HaMikdash also seems to translate it as some sort of red.


2

I've noticed that a general pattern to many of the differences between Terumah and Vayakhel is that Terumah has a more precise account of the relationship between different parts or descriptions of the Mishkan. I think this indicates a difference between Hashem's understanding of the Mishkan and a human understanding. Betzalel and his workers created the ...


2

I would suggest the following Chiddush, but I welcome feedback as usual. The prohibition of removing the Badim immediately follows in Shemos 25, but not in Shemos 37. I would like to suggest that the word "Bahem" was only present in Shemos 25:14 in order to emphasize that they must be what the Aron is carried with and therefore they may never be removed. ...


2

Since the Aron was supposed to contain the luchos (whether one or both), a new one could not be made without them. Since the luchos were in the original aron, they were not available for the second temple. Had they attempted to make a new one, it would not have had any kedusha and just been an empty box. Note that the Menorah, Shulchan, and Mizbeach were ...


2

There are a few possible answers and facts here that build on each other: 1) A previous comment of Rashi just before on 75a, already spelled out the case by saying we do not learn out "from the red dyed skins of rams"..etc. because they did not need to be specifically killed by "shechitah". (Apparently they were not needed to be eaten or offered, but merely ...


2

The Greek term for Argaman seems to be porphyra, and this color was used to describe a variety of shades. see http://community.middlebury.edu/~harris/Classics/purple.html. (Note his comment on comparing the color to the sea, "eino ke'ein hayam") Argaman was probably used in the same way, referring as much to a hue or iridescence as to a specific color.


2

The Aron did not take up any room as it says Yoma 21a and Megila 10b. Likewise we find in Avos 5,5 עומדים צפופים ומשתחוים רווחים they stood in the Bais Hamikdash squashed and bowed down with space. So too with Aharon and Moshe - who were 10 Amos tall not including the Mitznefes, which made them taller - didn't suddenly bang their heads because their ...


2

A source (possibly the source for detailed symbolism) though not with the exact parallels, is quoted by R. Zedekiah (early 13th c.) in his Shibbole HaLeket (§3) in the name of a certain R. Meir, although it is found more elaborately in the Bereshit Rabbati of R. Moshe HaDarshan (ed. Albeck, p. 32). Since I can’t locate an online link, here is the text of BR: ...


1

It says in Likutei Sichos for example, parshas Terumah volume 3 section 7: "In parshas Yisro, it speaks about the giving of the Torah, where there was the accomplishment of the connection of spirituality with the physical, the combining of "upper" and "lower". And the same idea (although with a slight addition {see later}), was this also in ...


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