5

Yisro is not coming against the torah, but speaking of the practical method of governing the people. Moshe did not judge the people in that way on the instructions of Hashem, but based on his own understanding. Indeed. Yisro told Moshe to consult with Hashem and he would see that this practical advice is correct. Rashi explains Yisro 18:19 Now listen to ...


5

This is indeed another version of the Ta'am Elyon. A nice overview is given in the Likutei He'aros Mesorah, who assumes that this happened by accident: In Exodus, Chapter 20 contains 20 verses according to the Eastern tradition, but 22 verses according to the Western tradition . The Eastern tradition counts 10 verses in the Ten Decrees, counting one ...


5

Midrash Tanchuma (Parshat Vayeilech Moshe # 2) refers to it as Parshat Vayishma Yitro: וזהו תורה צוה לנו משה כמנין תורה צוה לנו משה והשנים צוה הקב"ה כמו שפרשתי בפרשת וישמע יתרו Ramban (commentary to Genesis 43:20) refers to it in the same way: ועוד לפנינו בפרשת ויגש אליו אמר לו יהודה בייא אתה מעביר עלינו שכך אמרת לנו ואשימה עיני עליו זו היא השמת עין ...


3

I think it's simply that Yisro is the first interesting word in the text. (As Al Berko wrote in his comment.) But we shouldn't underestimate how much his contribution added to the giving of the Torah. We generally discuss his suggestion to have a hierarchy of "sarim" (leaders) in terms of courts and adjudication. But they were there to answer questions in ...


3

Maybe it's to highlight the fact that he added an extra Parsha (Shmos 18:21) into the Torah, as Rashi informs us: יֶתֶר, עַל שֵׁם שֶׁיִּתֵּר פָּרָשָׁה אַחַת בַּתּוֹרָה "וְאַתָּה תֶחֱזֶה" ‏


3

Yisro's daughter Tzipora was in Egypt (as explained by the Ramban quoting Midrash Shemos Rabba here Why Moses didn't care for his sons after leaving Egypt? ) with Moshe Rabeinu when he went as an Emmisary on behalf of Hashem to let the Jewish people go. When he arrived in Egypt and was reminded of how he escaped from Pharoh, he called his son Eliezer ...


3

Midrash Shemos Rabba 4,4: ובאלה שמות רבה (ד ד), וילך משה, להיכן הלך שהלך ליטול אשתו ובניו, אמר לו יתרו להיכן אתה מוליכן, למצרים אמר לו, משהם מבקשים לצאת את מוליכן למצרים, אמר לו, למחר עתידין לצאת ולעמוד על הר סיני ולשמוע מפי הגבורה אנכי ה' אלהיך אשר הוצאתיך מארץ מצרים ובני לא ישמעו עמהם, אמר לו יתרו לך לשלום. ועל דעתם ראוי שנפרש אחרי שהסכימו בכך צוהו הקב''...


3

There are indeed 72 verses using the Ta'am Elyon split up. I counted on Mechon Mamre. That's 62 for the rest of the Parsha and 10 for the Ten Commandments. (It seems you stumbled upon a mistaken rendition of the Ta'am Elyon. Until quite recently, the two sets were always written overlaid. When various people started printing them separately, they ...


2

Artscroll (in their edition of Rashi, p. 206) translates your quote as "because he caused one more passage of the Torah to be written" and comments "He caused one more passage of the Torah to be written" does not mean that there was a change made in the Torah. It is a basic tenet of Judaism that the Torah can never be changed. Rather, this means that ...


2

Radak writes in his commentary to Genesis 15:2 that Abraham gave his servant the name Eliezer: או אפשר שהיה שמו דמשק כשבא אל אברם והוא קרא אותו אליעזר כי אליעזר לשון עברי הוא Why he specifically chose the name Eliezer may be based on the Midrash in Bereishit Rabbah Parshah 44: הוא דמשק אליעזר שבשבילו רדפתי מלכים עד דמשק ועזרני האל Here it seems that ...


2

You can read in detail about the issue in this great article. To keep it short, Shevuot 20b mentions that the two versions were said in a single utterance, which is beyond human comprehension: כדתניא זכור ושמור בדיבור אחד נאמרו, מה שאין יכול הפה לדבר, ומה שאין האוזן יכול לשמוע.‏ As it has been taught: Remember and keep were pronounced in a single ...


1

Here's an explanation you might find satisfactory: The first difference between the 2 versions is who said it - the first was said by G-d and the second by Moses and as indirect prophecy (it wasn't preceded by "וידבר הק אל משה לאמר" - he described the Decalogue in his own words. The second is to whom they were said: the first was said to the Generation of ...


1

The Zohar (vol. 2, p. 67b) states that Yisro's recognition of Hashem was a necessary prerequisite for the Torah to be given: רָזָא דְּמִלָּה, בְּשַׁעֲתָא דְּהַאי מֶלֶךְ וְהַאי כֹּהֵן אִתְכַּפְיָין, וְאִתְּבָּרוּ, כְּדֵין כָּל סִטְרִין אַחֲרָנִין אִתְכַּפְיָין, וְאוֹדָן לֵיהּ לְּקוּדְשָׁא בְּרִיךְ הוּא, כְּדֵין קוּדְשָׁא בְּרִיךְ הוּא שָׁלִיט בִּלְחוֹדוֹי ...


1

It says in Likutei Sichos for example, parshas Terumah volume 3 section 7: "In parshas Yisro, it speaks about the giving of the Torah, where there was the accomplishment of the connection of spirituality with the physical, the combining of "upper" and "lower". And the same idea (although with a slight addition {see later}), was this also in ...


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