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The Mishna does sometimes include extra details in stories. DoubleAA points us at Ketubbot 102b מעשה היה ושחטוהו ערב הפסח even though it doesn't really matter that it was on Erev Pesach. Brachot 2a includes the fact that Rabban Gamliel's sons were returning from a wedding, even though their obligation in Shema would be the same regardless of what they were ...


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The Bible reports when the Philistine woman Delilah sheared Samson’s hair, his source of strength, while Samson was asleep. Actually, Samson’s strength was determined by his observance of the mandates placed by angels, this includes the prohibition of cutting hair. However, Samson knew Delilah would cut his hair since she attempted to dilute his powers ...


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Ralbag explains that growing his hair physically contributed to his strength, but God also granted him additional strength on account of him being a nazirite. He proves this from the fact that when Samson cut his hair he lost his strength immediately – had the strength been solely from growing his hair it would have dissipated over time: ועם שבזה הענין ...


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It is not that the power is in the hair itself, however, he was granted the power as long as he kept the vow of the nezirus. Letting his hair be cut, caused him to break the vow. It was breaking the vow that caused him to lose his power. Shoftim 13:5 Because you shall conceive, and bear a son; and a razor shall not come upon his head, for a Nazirite to ...


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There is nothing in the Nazirite vow which gives one special physical strength, and a non-Jew does not become a Nazirite. https://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/287358/jewish/The-Nazir-and-the-Nazirite-Vow.htm Male or female Jews can become nazirites, but non-Jews cannot. For more details, the source of this rule and the talmudic logic behind it,...


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