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26 votes

Why does Torah consider Bats as birds?

Rabbi Dr. Natan Slifkin, director of The Biblical Museum of Natural History in Beit Shemesh has an article on this in his Rationalist Judaism blog, here. The paragraph that probably answers your ...
Danny Schoemann's user avatar
20 votes

Why does Torah consider Bats as birds?

The Passuk (Vayikra 11,13) uses the phrase ואת אלה תשקצו מן העוף לא יאכלו when describing all birds bats and insects The word עוף essentially means "a being that flies" This is proven from Tehilim ...
user15464's user avatar
  • 11.5k
16 votes

Are dik-diks kosher animals?

The animal is part of the antelope family and has split hooves and chewes the cud. I would always consult a rabbi, as this answer is not a halachic dictation. Based on the information in your link ...
RonP's user avatar
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16 votes
Accepted

Why would muscovy duck be treif?

The kosher status of birds differs from that of animals and fish, in that there are no biblically based physical indicators and thus today the determination is made based on tradition (mesorah). Rabbi ...
Ari Zivotofsky's user avatar
12 votes

I'd love to but Hashem doesn't let

The Rambam in Shemoneh Perakim, ch. 6, discusses the preferable attitude towards avoiding aveiros, and references this midrash. After citing sentiments of the Nevi'im, such as (Mishlei 21:10) "נֶפֶשׁ ...
Y     e     z's user avatar
9 votes

Source that tzaar baalei chayyim only applies to kosher animals?

This is incorrect. Examples given include loading and unloading a donkey as we see in Tzaar Baalei Chayim Thus, the halacha applies to all animals In Shemot, we are told to help him unload: “If you ...
sabbahillel's user avatar
  • 43.2k
8 votes

Giving a ham as a present to a gentile

Most likely inadvisable; may actually depend on the terms and conditions of the company from which you're ordering. Thanks to NJM for pointing to an essay from Rabbi Moshe Dovid Lebovits of Kof-K ...
Shalom's user avatar
  • 133k
8 votes

Is it prohibited to have a painting \ sculpure of a pig or any other non kosher animal in one's home?

First, the permission to paint or sculpt is not related to whether we can eat the animal. Some animals are treated more strictly: humans ,eagle, lion and bull. There are differences between ...
kouty's user avatar
  • 22.8k
8 votes

Punishment for Eating Non-Kosher

The prescribed punishment for intentionally eating meat of a non-kosher animal (e.g. pork) is lashes. Rambam writes in Hilchot Maachalot Assurot 2:2: כל האוכל מבשר בהמה וחיה טמאה כזית לוקה מן ...
Joel K's user avatar
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8 votes
Accepted

Why don’t Sheretzs made into a Streimel convey tumah?

Once a hide is tanned, even a bit, it no longer conveys impurity (Chullin 9:2).
Double AA's user avatar
  • 99.5k
7 votes

What's a better choice: Treif meat or human flesh?

To add to mevaqesh's answer: R/Dr Alan Brill (Edah Journal, "Worlds Destroyed, Worlds Rebuilt: The Religious Thought of Rabbi Yehudah Amital") retells "two stories of moral challenges ...
Micha Berger's user avatar
  • 9,668
6 votes

What's a better choice: Treif meat or human flesh?

Rabbi Moshe Shemuel Glasner (1856-1924) writes in the introduction of his Dor HaRevi'i to Chullin Pesicha Kolleles § 2 s.v עוד משל אחת that if one has the option to consume human flesh or non-kosher ...
mevaqesh's user avatar
  • 35.7k
6 votes
Accepted

Why aren't penguins kosher as sea-dwelling creatures?

The Mishnah (Keilim 17:13) says that the creature called “dog of the sea” - which lives mainly in the sea, but will emerge onto land when escaping predators - is not considered a sea creature. so it ...
שלום's user avatar
  • 3,272
5 votes

Is this squid with scales kosher?

Nachmanides (Commentary on the Torah, Leviticus 11:9), basing himself on the Talmud, Tosefta and Targumin, explains that the qasqeseth required by the Torah refers to a scale that is separate/...
Loewian's user avatar
  • 17.8k
5 votes
Accepted

Is honeydew (secretion) kosher

OU Kosher brings the following answer to your question Both Rabbi Belsky, zt”l and Rabbi Schachter, ybc”l maintained that honeydew honey is not kosher. This is the case according to both opinions ...
mbloch's user avatar
  • 52.9k
4 votes

What's a better choice: Treif meat or human flesh?

So we will now analyze the order of which comes first human or treif animal Flesh . Rambam Hilchos maacholos asuros 2,3: האדם אע"פ שנאמר בו ויהי האדם לנפש חיה אינו מכלל מיני חיה בעלת פרסה לפיכך ...
user15464's user avatar
  • 11.5k
4 votes
Accepted

May one eat cheese that is wormy?

The Taz 89:4 explains hard cheese as both 6 months old or one that is wormy(Taz notes to be machmir for this case) ,and then would require 6 hours of waiting to eat meat. The reason why the worms in ...
sam's user avatar
  • 42.1k
3 votes

Is this squid with scales kosher?

R. Natan Slifkin: Contrary to popular belief, the Torah does not say that a sea creature has to be a fish in order to be kosher. It only speaks of “anything that has fins and scales.” And, uniquely ...
Joel K's user avatar
  • 43.7k
3 votes

Kashrut of rennet for cheese & Difference between rennet and gelatin

Your first question is a strong question which I have not found answered elsewhere on MY. This other answer to your question answers the second question but doesn't address the core issue of "how can ...
mbloch's user avatar
  • 52.9k
3 votes

Is the blood of a non-Kosher animal forbidden because of וכל דם לא תאכלו

Rambam’s source seems to be an explicit mishnah in Kereitot 5:1: דַּם שְׁחִיטָה בִּבְהֵמָה, בְּחַיָּה וּבְעוֹפוֹת, בֵּין טְמֵאִים וּבֵין טְהוֹרִים ... חַיָּבִים עָלָיו ... דַּם דָּגִים, דַּם ...
Joel K's user avatar
  • 43.7k
3 votes

Is there a list of kosher duck species?

According to the Chasam Sofer (shu"t YD 74) wild geese (ducks?) are not kosher, citing Tzemach Tzedek (Siman 29). The Star-K seems to rule in accordance with this position and will not certify ...
Naftali Tzvi's user avatar
  • 1,748
3 votes

Buying commodities of lean hogs

It would seem from the Halachic literature that the problem of selling non-kosher food or animals is only if there's a risk of eating the non-kosher things one sells. If one is a middle-man then it's ...
Danny Schoemann's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Are cicadas kosher?

Good question, but no. Leviticus 11:22 allows only four species of locust. No other insects are kosher. Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan (who was also a scientist) translated them as follows: "the red locust, ...
Shalom's user avatar
  • 133k
3 votes
Accepted

What is the kosher status of quail and pheasant and other similar birds? How do they differ from turkey?

Unlike the turkey which is a North American bird and whose path to becoming kosher is a great story of its own, OU writes there was a tradition to eat certain types of quail (it was eaten by the ...
mbloch's user avatar
  • 52.9k
2 votes

Food that became prohibited because of a fly, then was separated into 3 new parts, nullified?

If the fly is still intact and there's no way of locating it e.g the soup had loads of poppy seeds floating around, then Shulchan oruch Yoreh Dea siman 100 would apply: Seif 1: בריה דהיינו כגון נמלה ...
user15464's user avatar
  • 11.5k
2 votes

Why does Hashem allow Noah et al to eat *all* animals?

Ralbag in his commentary there explains why Noah and his descendants only got partial laws: והנה הספיקו אלו המצות לבני נח לתקון קבוציהם לפי שכבר ידע השם יתע' שלא יאות בהם בכללם שיקבלו מהשלמות יותר ...
Alex's user avatar
  • 49.5k
2 votes

Salmons and eels touching in the fish shop, is the salmon still ok to purchase?

The answer I just looked up on kashrut.com is that its ok if the juices from non kosher fish get on kosher fish. Just wash it off with water at home. Buying a whole fish and doing the necessary ...
gamliela's user avatar
  • 194
2 votes

Why would the blue-footed booby be treif?

First off, let me say that you have purposed an excellent question. See this fine article. The quotation below is taken from it. The Torah, in Parshas Shmini, when informing us of the kashrus ...
ezra's user avatar
  • 18.7k
2 votes

Giving a ham as a present to a gentile

Rabbi Lebovitz explains, Food items which are forbidden to do business with on a d’oraisa level (like ham is forbidden in the torah) may not be given to a non-Jew as a present. The reason is ...
NJM's user avatar
  • 14.3k

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