12

Yes there are many differences. Jews are allowed to eat pieces taken from the animal immediately after shechita is performed, even while the animal is still moving מפרכס (blood must still be removed -- which is harder to do compared to regular meat, because it was taken alive-ish). Shechita kills the animal, even if it is still convulsing. (Simla Chadasha ...


8

I saw this discussed in Ateres Shmuel (by Rav Mordechai Rosenbaum) to Kesubos 15b ד"ה אם רוב עכו"ם . The gemarra there says an abandoned child that is found in a city of mostly non Jews is treated as a non Jew, to the extent that we can directly feed him non kosher food (Rashi). The Ateres Shmuel asks why didn't Rashi just say the child can feed ...


8

The religious significance in wearing a prayer shawl lies specifically in the tzitzit fringes themselves. Technically any garment of four corners can be used as a prayer shawl, so long as it has the tzitziyot on them. As for a non-Jew wearing tzitzit, there is nothing offensive or wrong with your wearing tzitzit so long as you are aware that you do so on a ...


8

Writing as a ben Noach, there is no definitive answer on what we do; only what we can't do(save setting up a court). Bnei Noach can do whatever they want as long as they don't transgress the seven. Brit Noach is a covenant of wild freedom, basically. For the details of the seven, I go by the Rambam, Hilchot Melachim Ch. 8-10. Since Brit Noach allows so much ...


8

Basing himself on Maimonides' ruling in Hilkhot Melakhim (8:10), "וכן צוה משה רבינו מפי הגבורה לכוף את כל באי העולם לקבל מצות שנצטוו בני נח" , the Lubavitcher Rebbe argued that it is incumbent upon each Jew to persuade the gentiles into observance of the seven Noahide laws. See Ha-Pardes vol. 59:9 (1985), pp. 7-11. Michael J. Broyde, “The Obligation of Jews ...


7

Your first question should be asked of somone who is an expert in animal slaughter such as the OU or the STAR-K (Baltimore Vaad Hakashrus) who can tell you if the 'humane' practices required by the FDA ensure that the meat is not 'living' when it is being cut up originally. It could be a matter of how long after the slaughter they wait to actually cut it ...


7

There are a number of Rabbis, mostly Chabad, involved in teaching Bnei Noach and answering their halachic questions. One of the more prominent ones is Rabbi Yaakov Rogalsky, co-author of Path of the Righteous Gentile. Another is Rabbi Chaim Richman.


7

This is debated by the Gemara (Avodah Zarah 64b). The Rambam rules that it is forbidden to drink the wine of a ger toshav, but it is permitted to derive benefit from it. This is the ruling of the Shulchan Aruch as well, regarding all non-idolatrous gentiles (Yoreh De'ah 124:6).


5

According to Sefer Sheva Mitzvot Hashem on the subject, to study the two Torah parashios (bereshis and Noah) are basically related to Noahide Laws in general. See there on Yesodos ha-emunah, perek 5:3 (rough translation below): It is permitted for a gentile to read the Tanakh, even with traditional expositions of the pshat in order to correctly ...


5

While R. Elijah Benamozegh was apparently somewhat controversial in his day, he is hardly a "unquotable" figure: R. David Zvi Hoffmann and R. Mendel Kasher quote him in their work repeatedly, his work בשבילי המוסר was published by Mossad Harav Kook, and he is included in R. Avraham Bick-Shauli's anthology of Jewish thought. R. Yoel Schwartz (of Meah Shearim) ...


5

The logic of the description in The Tenets of Reform Judaism cited by @ARK96 would seem to imply that it is not a valid source for Noachides. The reason would be that Reform Judaism differs from the other major movements in that it views both the Oral and Written laws as a product of human hands Reform Judaism demands that Jews confront the claims ...


4

i would like to add another point, the Lubavitcher Rebbe also said that the reason this was not a common practice throughout the ages was because of jewish persecution. and that many halchic rulings were based on that, or coming in that spirit. however today when we are in a "malchus shel chessed", different times call for different measures. see http://...


4

The answer to this question depends on whether non-Jews have the obligation of לפני עיוור לא תתן מכשול (the prohibition of placing a stumbling block before the blind). I address this question in this answer. In summary, the prohibition of lifnei iver--even according to the more stringent opinion--only applies to non-Jews for halachot that they are obligated ...


4

Rambam Hilchos Melachim 8:11 writes in accordance with your first option. כל המקבל שבע מצות ונזהר לעשותן הרי זה מחסידי אומות העולם. ויש לו חלק לעולם הבא. והוא שיקבל אותן ויעשה אותן מפני שצוה בהן הקב"ה בתורה והודיענו על ידי משה רבינו שבני נח מקודם נצטוו בהן. אבל אם עשאן מפני הכרע הדעת אין זה גר תושב ואינו מחסידי אומות העולם ולא מחכמיהם Anyone who ...


4

Yes, they are punishable for violating any of these seven mitzvos; none of them are more or less severe than the others. The punishment for each of them is decapitation (Rambam, Hilchos Melachim 9:14). No warning is needed, but there needs to be at least one male witness and at least one male judge (ibid.). The judge can be either a Jew or a non-Jew (ibid. ...


4

There's a dispute in Sanhedrin exactly which relationships are forbidden to Benei Noach. Sanhedrin 58b brings the following statement of Rav Hunah: אמר רב הונא כותי מותר בבתו Rav Huna says: A gentile is permitted to marry his daughter. Rashi there explains that this statement is according to all opinions. The Ein Mishpat there cites the Rambam (Hilchos ...


3

According to Sefer Sheva Mitsvos Hashem vol I, Perek 3 (which deals with the prohibition of creating a new religion) they are forbidden both to add or subtract. The "adding laws scenario" would imply, of course, one to know exactly which laws are derivations or subdivisions of its own legislation and not merely additions to a particular law instead.


3

Rambam says in Melachim uMilchamot - Chapter 8 (11) Anyone who accepts upon himself the fulfillment of these seven mitzvot and is precise in their observance is considered one of 'the pious among the gentiles' and will merit a share in the world to come. This applies only when he accepts them and fulfills them because the Holy One, blessed be ...


3

The Rambam states in הלכות מלכים הלכה יא כל המקבל שבע מצות בני נח ונזהר לעשותן הרי זה מחסידי עומות העולם. ויש לו חלק עולם הבא. והוא שיקבל אותן ויעשה אותן מפני שצוה בהן הקב"ה בתורה והודיענו על ידי משה רבינו שבני נח מקודם נצטוו בהן. אבל אם עשען מפני הכרע הדעת אין זה גר תושב ואיו מחסידי עומות העולם ולא מחכמיהם. Melachim uMilchamot 8:11 translates this ...


3

I'm not sure if you really need to source disapproval of R. Benamozegh specifically, because mainstream Orthodoxy doesn't consider him worth talking about (as you've discovered). Almost all of his unique viewpoints are considered heresy; just pick up any Chareidi-published book on the Principles of Faith. It would take a long time to list all of the places ...


3

In the beginning of cheilek we are told a Jew who believes in techiyas hameisim but does not believe that it is hinted to in the Torah, does not rise from the dead when it happens. Rashi explains who needs him and his beleifs. Meaning, as far as just payback from Hashem goes, you get what you give. The Rambam explains that a good nonbeliever jew gets his ...


3

The answer depends on your own desires and feelings, on your external circumstances, and on what eventually happens. If believe in Judaism but do not feel a longing to be study the entire Torah (Written and Oral and, more broadly, the various commentaries since), be bound by and in practice actually fulfill all the mitzvot that apply to you, and to become ...


3

Rabbi Meir is talking about the merit of non jews studying Torah, meaning, the Sheva Mitzvot bnei Noach. The conclusion of that is in the continuation of Gemara in Sanhedrin 59a which you quote: התם בשבע מצות דידהו There (in the baraita) [the reference is to] their Sheva Mitzvot. R. Yaakov b. R. Abba Mari Anatoli (13th century) in his Malmad haTalmidim (...


2

It's fine to be a Jew at heart. This is similar to saying, "I would love to have more money!" This is not the same as investing in a business or in a stock, because those require actions. No one will pay you dividends for a stock you wish you had. If you can write a question like you did, then you can certainly understand the implication in the above example ...


2

actually belief in G-d is part of those 7 commandments. here are the 7 listed and defined (copied and pasted from chabad.org) These are the Seven Noahide Laws, as enumerated in the Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin 56a: 1:carry out justice - An imperative to pursue and enforce social justice, and a prohibition of any miscarriage of justice. 2:no blasphemy - ...


2

Based on this responsa, under the heading טענה ראשונה - הריגת גוי המפר אחת משבע מצוות בני נח it seems that most early Poskim hold that a Jew is not allowed to kill a non-Jew who transgressed one of the Noachide Laws. Specifically: The Bet Yosef (יורה דעה, סי' קנח) apparently allows it. The following Rishonim seem to forbid it: Rashi (עבודה זרה יג ע"ב, ד"...


2

I see that there are resources on the Internet which are specially for Noahides. I suggest you look here 1, forbidden meat and here 2, humane-slaughter information and the forum. Source 2 has “Recommended practice” (source: Dr. Temple Grandin) which states that Cardiac arrest stunning is more effective than conventional electric stunning. This may give a ...


2

Noach as a direct descendant of Adam was a member of the Human Race. At that time, people were divided into families and the concept of race had not yet been set up. The dispersion of the human race into different national groups did not occur until the Tower of Babel (in 1996 after creation, 300 years after the flood). Until then the human race was divided ...


2

As explained in The Meaning and Significance of Zera Avraham we can see the following: The Gemarah itself expresses this distinction as well. In Meseches Sanhedrin (59b), the Gemarah derives that the mitzvah of bris milah applies only to the descendants of Yitzchak, but not to the descendants of Yishmael, from the possuk: "Va'ata es brisi tishmor, ...


2

Avodah Zara 2b Seems that nowadays they're not punished דתני רב יוסף (חבקוק ג, ו) עמד וימודד ארץ ראה ויתר גוים מאי ראה ראה ז' מצות שקבלו עליהן בני נח ולא קיימום כיון שלא קיימום עמד והתירן להן As Rav Yosef teaches: “He stands, and shakes the earth, He sees, and makes the nations tremble” (Habakkuk 3:6). What did God see? He saw the seven mitzvot that the ...


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