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7

I've heard that after the sin of the Golden Calf, the Clouds of Glory were taken away. After Yom Kippur, Moshe told the Jews to start donating for the Mishkan. On Sukkos, all the necessary materials were obtained, and the Clouds of Glory returned.


7

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 428:2) informs us that under the current fixed calendar, Rosh Chodesh Nissan will only fall on either Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday, or Saturday. So there can be weeks of 7, 5, 3, or 1 day respectively.


5

In OC 471 sk 12, the Mishna Berurah mentions that certain types of matza which we are only machmir to treat as chametz (eg matza that folded over itself in the oven) are forbidden to be eaten on Erev Pesach as they are actually kosher matza according to the basic law. The assumption of this point is that had they actually been chametz, they would have been ...


5

To quote myself: The Mishna Berura (OC 471 sk 10) points out that one may eat Matza Ashira (eg. Egg Matza) on Erev Pesach because one cannot fulfill his obligation to eat matza on seder night with it. Seemingly the only things that are forbidden to eat are those with which one can fulfill his obligation to eat matza.


5

Nissan starts without Tachnun because it is the time when the Mishkan was inaugurated - that is the first 12 days. Then the 13th is the Isru Chag of those 12 days (The Tzemach Tzedek quoting the Maharil), and then there is no Tachnun on the 14th because the Korban Pesach was brought, and then Pesach. So there is no opportunity to say Tachanun until the ...


4

There are several new years. (What!?) There is a new year for the world, a new year for the Jewish people, a new year for the trees, etc. Nissan is the first month because it's the new year for the Jewish people, as it's the month the Children of Israel left Egypt. (Throughout the Tanach, whenever the "first month" is mentioned, they are speaking of the ...


3

The OP asks about attending the siyum and only eating later at a different place and time? The Minchas Yitzchak (vol.9:45) and Rav Elyashav (I heard this from Rav Smith) both say (as do others) that the simchah of the siyum is what releases the fast. Therefore, you may eat later and elsewhere. One idea for this is the Gemara (Shabbos 118) that says when ...


2

The basis of the prohibition of eating matzah on erev Pesach (which was later expanded to longer periods before Pesach) may be found in Yerushalmi Pesachim 68b: אמר רבי לוי האוכל מצה בערב הפסח כבא על ארוסתו בבית חמיו והבא על ארוסתו בבית חמיו לוקה 'Rabbi Levi said: One who eats matzah on erev Pesach is like one who has intercourse with his betrothed ...


2

A lot more sources posted at Dose of Halacha According to some poskim (Halachos Ketanos 2:28; Kaf Hachaim OC 226:1) the beracha should only be recited in the month of Nissan, though most poskim (Ritva, Rosh Hashana 11a; Mishna Berura 226:1; Aruch Hashulchan OC 226:1; Tzitz Eliezer 12:20:3) write that one should say it whenever when one first sees the ...


2

The main things done for a yahrtzeit are: Getting Maftir on the Shabbos before Getting an Aliya to the torah Davening from the Amud Learning mishnayos l'ilui nishmas the niftar Lighting a yahrtziet candle Saying Kaddish Going to the kever and reciting certain pirkei Tehilim Reciting Kel Maleh Rachamim Fasting Of all the above listed items, the only ones ...


2

According to chabad.org "A further reason why we recall the miracle on Shabbat rather than on the tenth of the month is that, forty years later, Miriam died on that day and the well which accompanied the Children of Israel and provided them with water in the wilderness, disappeared. When the anniversary of Miriam's death fails on a weekday, some observe it ...


2

In the sidur Bes Yaakov (Emden) it indicates that on the first of Nisan 7:1–17 is said; then each paragraph on its day through the eleventh; on the twelfth, 7:78–89 is said; and on the thirteenth, 8:1–4. [On the fourteenth, nothing is.]


2

My son is the gabbai of our shul and he followed the minhag of our shul by announcing that he would be doing Kail Malei for each person who needed it at Mincha of Shabbos Mevorchim. Everyone who needed it came up at Mincha to have it done. Our shul has three mincha minyonim on Shabbos (after Daylight Savings Time starts), 2 P.M., 5:30 P.M. and a later mincha ...


2

While it is true that Pharoah later regretted letting the Hebrews leave on the 15th of Nissan, this was indeed the day that the exile of Egypt ended, and that seems to be what the seder night commemorates, i.e. the Exodus. Indeed, the final destruction of the subjugation of the Hebrews to the Egyptians is also commemorated on the 21st of Nissan. As such, ...


2

As I explain in my answer the Jews were still scheduled to be murdered (without any penalty) on 13 Adar. Thus, the final redemption did not occur until after the fighting was over, Thus we celebrate the day after the fighting, especially since the Jews had no casualties.


2

wiki If a firstborn attending a siyum does not hear the completion of the tractate, or if he does not understand what he hears, or if he is in the shiva period of mourning and is thus forbidden from listening to the Torah material being taught, some authorities rule that subsequent eating would not qualify as a seudat mitzvah and he would therefore be ...


1

When I look at the translations of Lev 23 (10) I get no impression that there is a day referred to as Reishis Ketzir. See Chabad Speak to the children of Israel and say to them: When you come to the Land which I am giving you, and you reap its harvest, you shall bring to the kohen an omer of the beginning of your reaping. And Sefaria Speak to the ...


1

This site has it as 21 Nissan http://www.torahtots.com/timecapsule/thismonth/nisan.htm This site discusses whether it was 7 or 8 days from the Exodus (in Nissan) http://astrotorah.weeklyshtikle.com/2010/06/yam-suf-7-or-8-days-from-exodus.html Chabad.org also says 21 Nissan https://www.chabad.org/calendar/view/day.asp?tdate=4/26/2019


1

I am not sure if these are the two cycles to which you refer, but Rav Aharon Feldman shared a beautiful thought about the two cycles 1) Pesach, Shavuos, and Sukkos. 2) Rosh Hashona, Yom Kippur, Sukkos. Pesach is when the Jewish people were appointed by G-d as messenger. Shavuos is when we fulfilled our shlichus by receiving the Torah. And Sukkos is when ...


1

I found this on Plantvillage.org A few tree fruits require individual male and female trees; in other words female trees have only female flowers and bear fruit while male trees only have male flowers that produce pollen. Based on this, perhaps the Nusach of the Bracha is in the female form as there are some male trees that do not produce fruit on ...


1

Yes, he does need to fast. The main part of the Mitzvah is partaking of the meal. As a matter of fact, one could even eat of the meal and be a part of the Mitzvah without having heard the Siyum part. Source: The announcement made by the Rav of the Shul I go to every year for the Siyum.


1

The Rav of our shul spoke about this when discussing our shul minhag of not saying tachanun until Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan. Note that this is our shul minhag as other shuls in the community start tachanun after Isru Chag (or maybe on Isru Chag, I am not sure). The first part of the month continues tachanun because of the inyan of teshuvah and din. After Succos,...


1

There is a mashal that I am giving from memory. A king was warned that the queen would have a daughter who would die unless the first man that she saw would be at her wedding. He built a castle and the queen gave birth to the daughter there. The castle was staffed only with women and the queen often visited, telling the king how beautiful and accomplished ...


1

There are various "degrees" of "mourning". Generally, the most noticeable change is refraining from hearing music, which, BTW, is not a minhag mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch. It developed years later and has become a common minhag. (After the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this halacha.) Generally, the strict ...


1

Taame Haminhagim, footnote 70 to section 597 (page 249), says: In the book Maase Rav of the gaon of Vilna, of blessed memory, item 185, the author writes that [the Vilna gaon] tried, on the night after [Pesach], to taste chametz, and also did not eat, after Pesach, matza one could fulfill the obligation [of matza] with, in order to distinguish performance ...


1

Found it thanks to DoubleAA. The Rama 296:2 writes that is a custom to use beer on motzai pesach. However, on a regular motzai Shabbas he writes that pagum (someone drank from it) wine is better than beer.


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