Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
31

There is a tradition, recorded in various sources, that the prophet Ovadiah was an Edomite convert. This tradition is born of the fact that there is nothing within his short (one chapter) oracle that concerns Judeans or Israelites; the entire thing is an oracle about the Edomites instead. Sources: Sanhedrin 39b; Tanchuma, Tazria 8. See also Rashi and ...


22

The Tosefta (Sotah 13:4) writes: משמתו נביאים האחרונים חגי זכריה ומלאכי פסקה רוח הקודש מישראל Once the last prophets -- Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi -- died, the prophetic spirit ceased in Israel. Additionally, the Talmud (Bava Batra 14b) writes: וחגי זכריה ומלאכי סוף נביאים הוו Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi were the end of the prophets. These ...


20

The last of the true prophets (nevi'im) were indeed Chaggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. The Talmud (Bava Batra 12a) cites: R. Abdimi from Haifa said: Since the day when the Temple was destroyed, prophecy has been taken from the prophets and given to the wise. i.e. the wise can predict the future using their wisdom, but not through nevua - prophecy. (The ...


16

The Rambam (Teshuvah 9:2) says he will be a prophet almost as great as Mosheh Rabbeinu.


15

The answer is no. In Yehoshua 23:6, Yehoshua says to the people: וַחֲזַקְתֶּם מְאֹד--לִשְׁמֹר וְלַעֲשׂוֹת, אֵת כָּל-הַכָּתוּב בְּסֵפֶר תּוֹרַת מֹשֶׁה: לְבִלְתִּי סוּר-מִמֶּנּוּ, יָמִין וּשְׂמֹאול Be very strong to protect and do everything that is written in Moshe's Torah. Do not deviate from it to the right or to the left. In Deuteronomy 4:...


15

Unfortunately, indeed we do not have prophets today, and Chazal say that the last prophets were Hagai, Zecharia and Malachi. Rashi's momentous perush on most of the Bible and most of the gemara speak for themselves, however here are a few quotes (loose translations by me, except for the last Rashi) about his special work (this list can go on forever): The ...


14

In general, it seems the prophet would fall into a prophetic state, so it would be clear that it wasn't just a random voice speaking to him. See, for example, Berishis 15 where God appears to Avraham first in "a vision", and then in "a deep sleep... a dread, a great darkness". However, it seems that sometimes Nevuah sounded just like a person's voice, and ...


14

Whether or not David was a navi seems be an age-old discussion among Jewish authorities. On the one hand, there seem to be many futuristic concepts throughout Tehillim, especially about the destruction of the Temple and the eventual redemption. Assuming that David was the author of at least most of the psalms would imply that he had at least some form of ...


14

According to R. Yehudah Halevi, a convert cannot be a prophet. The question on R. Yehudah Halevi's view is that Chazal say Ovadiah was a convert. This question, which was raised by the commentators on the Kuzari, is addressed by R. Yitzchak Sheilat who suggests that R. Yehudah Halevi's view depends on a possible dispute in the Gemara about whether Ovadiah ...


13

The Ibn Ezra (in his introduction to Malachi) writes that Malachi was the last prophet. The Rambam (Maimonides) in Melachim 11:1 implies that the Mashiach (messiah) will be a prophet (since he refers to the "other prophets"). (I think both of them agree, actually, just that Malachi was the last prophet until Mashiach.)


12

This is discussed by Abarbanel in his commentary to Rambam's Moreh Nevuchim (II:32). In his interpretation of R' Yochanan, he denies that R' Yochanan is referring to prophecy at all when he says "God causes his divine presence to rest...". God resting his divine presence on someone is different from His granting someone prophecy. (What exactly "resting His ...


12

Maybe you are thinking of Deuteronomy 34:10: "And there hath not arisen a prophet since in Israel like unto Moses" (OJPS). However, he was certainly not the last prophet; in fact the previous verse refers to Joshua being a prophet. Similarly, there are tons of prophets after Moses later in the Tanach. The verse in Deuteronomy simply means that Moshe was the ...


11

The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l has a different take on it. In his talk of Shabbos Parshas Vayeishev 5734 (Sichos Kodesh 5734 1:201-202), he explains that Yosef told over these dreams precisely because he hoped to use them to defuse his brothers' jealousy toward him. Previous dreams recorded in the Torah were basically meant to be taken at face value. For ...


11

In otzros hatorah page 263 on "vayiftach hashem es pi haton" rabenu bechayeh is quoted asking that Bilam should have been amazed but he was not. He should have marveled at this wonder. However because of his cruelty and evil nature and desire to go curse the Jews, he answered the donkey's question. It continues that from here you can understand why people ...


11

See the Medrash Raba on Shemos (Exodus) פרשה ג that states that (at least initially, at the burning bush) Hashem sounded just like Moshe's father Amrom when He spoke to him. אָמַר רַבִּי יְהוֹשֻׁעַ הַכֹּהֵן בַּר נְחֶמְיָה בְּשָׁעָה שֶׁנִּגְלָה הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא עַל משֶׁה טִירוֹן הָיָה משֶׁה לַנְּבוּאָה, ‏אָמַר הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא "אִם ...


10

The Rambam (Hilchos Teshuva 9:2:) writes that Moshaich will be a prophet: [These changes will come about] because the king who will arise from David's descendants will be a greater master of knowledge than Solomon and a great prophet, close to the level of Moses, our teacher. See also Melachim uMilchamot 12:3, where he writes that Moshaich will have "...


10

I think that, as far as 'what Gd wants from us', we have all we need from the prophets. We have the whole story of the world, from its creation through Messianic times, foretold in broad strokes, (why broad strokes). We also have all of the laws and traditions of our people that make up Jewish life, from the Pentateuch, and to a lesser degree from the other ...


10

Moses was involved in calling down fire from Heaven during the plague of hail in Egypt. Exodus 9:23-24 : (See the entire chapter for more details of the story.) "So Moses stretched forth his staff heavenward, and the L-rd gave forth thunder and hail, and fire came down to the earth, and the L-rd rained down hail upon the land of Egypt." "And there was hail,...


9

Yalkut Shimoni on Balak Tanchuma on Balak Midrash Rabah on Balak The gemaras mentioned in Toldos Aharon on Balak For a collection of all midrashim, you can look at R' Menachem Kasher's Torah Shleimah


9

To posit some sort of "prophetic perfect tense" or the like is entirely superfluous. I am confident that one is unable to grammatically distinguish between regular and "prophetic" usage. However we do find examples where a prophet will speak from a point of view in which a future event is seen as having transpired, see Numbers 24:17 for example. This is ...


9

Basically the answer would be the same as an answer to a question how do we distinguish reality from a dream. The realness of a prophecy would be overwhelming. Rabeinu Crescas addresses this question in his book "Ohr Hashem" (Maamar 2, Rule 4, Ch. 3). וזה, שכמו שיש יתרון להרגש החוש על הרגש הדמיון, שבעבורו יודע המרגיש והוא ער, שאיננו מרגיש בדמיון לבד, ...


8

The Bavli records (Temurah 16a): [The verse states: "These are the commandments" (Leviticus 27)] These are the commandments and no prophet is allowed to innovate something from now on. That said, later authorities do have a number of interesting powers (when not claiming to be doing so under direct divine order) including directing Jews to not perform ...


8

According to Midrash Eicha Zuta, it was written by ירמיה (Jeremiah). This is also reflected in the Septuagint (aka LXX aka Targum Shivim), which opens with the line "By Jeremias, in the Captivity." This is probably the oldest tradition. According to Rashi, Midrash Tehillim (aka Midrash Secher Tov), Pesiqta Rabbatti, Ibn Ezra in his introduction to Tehillim,...


8

Perhaps you wouldn't know, without someone to educate you. Ramchal, Derech Hashem, 3:4:3: הנה אפשר שיגיע גילוי ממנו ית' אל אדם והוא לא יכיר בו כמו שיכיר הנביא אלא יחשבהו בא מן המורגשות עד שיגבר עליו השפע הנבואיי ואז יכיר הענין כמות שהוא באמת. ומן המין הזה היתה קריאת ה' לשמואל שלא התנבא מתחלה ולא שפע עליו השפע אלא שנגלה עליו קול כקול מורגש ולא השיג בזה ...


8

There are a couple sources that indicate that Yishmael was a tzaddik at certain points in his life. Rashi to Breishit 25:17 notes that the the word ויגוע is only used by tzaddikim, and is used here to refer to Yishmael at the end of his life. ויגוע: לא נאמרה גויעה אלא בצדיקים:‏ Also, Rashi on 21:17 quotes a midrash where the angels are trying to ...


8

Midrash Tehilim 18:29 (in the name of R. Luliani) says that Hashem spoke with Moshe with the voice of Moshe himself: רבי לוליאני בשם רבי ישמעאל אמר בנוהג שבעולם הרב אומר והתלמיד עונה. אבל הקב"ה אינו כן (שם יט יט) משה ידבר והאלקים יעננו בקול. הוי וענותך תרבני Seems that the any other characteristics mentioned when applied to G-d's voice deppends on the ...


8

The Yerushalmi (Eiruvin 5:1, 31a) states that Elijah was טירונין לנביאים. The Korban Ha-Eidah defines this as גדול שבנביאים, and cites the Aruch who explains that this means he was the authority of the prophets (ענין שררה--see also here). [The P'nei Moshe, however, seems to understand the word as related to "tyro," i.e., a beginner.] It would seem that R. ...


7

http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=47079&st=&pgnum=567 When Nimrod started doing Avoda Zara, the nation of Ashur had no interest in idolatry. The nation of Ashur left their homes and established a new city "Ninve". In that merit Hashem sent Yona to Ninve to tell them to do Teshuva. (Imrei Chein)


7

Unsurprisingly, it is a machlokes--the Turei Even in Megillah (5a, 5b, 19b) holds that we treat it like a de'oraisa, and there is some support for his view in the Meiri (19b)--but since following his principle answers questions of rishonim like Tosfos and the Ran, apparently they did not think it was true. [Unless you say that they agree to the principle, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible