8

It's so one hand doesn't touch the other when passing between them. If an unwashed hand touches a washed hand while wet, the washed hand needs to start over (Shulchan Arukh OC 162:4; there are various details there about when exactly this rule applies, but the cups are designed to just avoid any issue).


4

The Machatzitz Hashekel Orach Chaim 4,1:3 quotes the Bach from Tolaas Yaakov in the name of the Zohar that one shouldn't walk 4 cubits after waking up in the morning without washing ones hands Netilas Yodayim. So a bowl with a cup next to one's bed is the solution. But the Mordechai (Rishon) seems to be lenient that one can walk till the sink to wash ones ...


3

(h/t to DoubleAA for linking this answer) The mishna in Ḥagiga 2:6 says: ‮6 הַטּוֹבֵל לְחֻלִּין וְהֻחְזַק לְחֻלִּין, אָסוּר לְמַעֲשֵׂר. טָבַל לְמַעֲשֵׂר וְהֻחְזַק לְמַעֲשֵׂר, אָסוּר לִתְרוּמָה. טָבַל לִתְרוּמָה, וְהֻחְזַק לִתְרוּמָה, אָסוּר לְקֹדֶשׁ. טָבַל לְקֹדֶשׁ וְהֻחְזַק לְקֹדֶשׁ, אָסוּר לְחַטָּאת. טָבַל לְחָמוּר, מֻתָּר לְקַל. טָבַל וְלֹא הֻחְזַק, ...


3

The Shulchan Aruch 4,18 says one must wash ones hand after going to the toilet, the Mishna Brura seif 40 explains that even if one merely enters the toilet he must wash his hands because of the רוח רעה the metaphysical contamination of his hands and the Kaf Hachaim adds ideally one should wash 3 times each hand after going to the toilet as this Ruach Raah is ...


2

The shu”a says (orach Chaim siman ד, seif ב): ידקדק לערות עליהם מים ג' פעמים להעביר רוח רעה ששורה עליהן: (when washing negel vasser) one should be careful to pour on them (each hand) three times, to get rid of the “bad spirit” that is upon them. We see from here that the reason for washing three times is because of the “bad spirit”. Later on the ...


1

In this day and age a person may have the tradition passed down to him that he is a Levi but we cannot be 100% certain if it is fact. There are indeed halachic rulings that acknowledge the difficulty in proving whether someone is a Levi: ma'aser rishon (the first tithe) should be given to a Levi - but since nobody can prove beyond doubt that they are a ...


1

Mishna Ketubot 2:10 אלו נאמנין להעיד בגודלן, מה שראו בקוטנן: נאמן אדם לומר, זה כתב ידו של אבא, וזה כתב ידו של רבי, וזה כתב ידו של אחי.... ושהיה איש פלוני יוצא מבית הספר לטבול לתרומתו...‏ These are trusted to testify as an adult what they saw as a child: a person is trusted to say this is my father's handwriting, and this is my teacher's ...


1

According to this answer, the reason to have a Levi washing the Kohen's hand is because there is some sort of tosefes Kedusha when washed by a Levi. As long as the person washing is a Levi, there would be no need for other Leviim to bother joining in. (This is to disprove any claim that there is a minhag or obligation for the Levitte to wash the Kohen's ...


1

Shulchan Aruch (OC 4:22) says the same (and is actually the source for the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch).


1

First of all, it is not clear one cannot wash hands in a clean modern-day bathroom (see e.g., here). But since there are opinions which require washing outside a bathroom and you ask for an option "without any halachic concerns whatsoever", I found two relevant solutions R Daniel Mann from Eretz Hemda (here, speaking of making blessing in the bathroom ...


1

It is not at all clear one needs to use a utensil to wash hands after using a bathroom. In a review of sources, R Ari Zivotofsky writes (here) Misconception: Upon exiting a bathroom, one should wash by pouring water from a keli (utensil) three times on each hand. Fact: There is an obligation to wash after using the bathroom (Shulchan Aruch OC 4:18), ...


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