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Rav Chaim Kanievsky says in his sefer "Shemos Baaretz": יש אומרים שיש לנפטר נחת רוח כשקוראין על שמו וכתבתי י"א כי באחרונים ראיתי שיש שכתבו כן ויש אומרים שזה טוב לתינוק עיין יומא ל"ח ב חזי מאי סליק ביה שנקרא בשם של רשע ובשם מרן החזו"א אמרו כי כאשר קורין שם ע"ש הנפטר הוא טובה לנפטר וכשקורין שם מפרשת השבוע הוא טובה לתינוק There are those that say that ...


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This is a source, though admittedly not an old one. The reason for this seems to be that it is a merit for a deceased person to have a descendant (or other relative) named after him or her.


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Sanhedrin 19a and Megillah 13a allude to your question. They say that a person who raises a child is like the person who bore him. Since Pharaoh's daughter Bisya raised Moshe, he is given the name that she called him. According to the Gemoro, Moshe's other names are mentioned in Divrei Hayamim 1 4:18. Moshe is the name by which G-d wants us to know him. I ...


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The name appears in 1st Chronicles 2:13 as אישי, and this was interpreted in דעת מקרא as a shorthand of אישיה - Ishyah - literally "Man of Jah". Compare this to אשבעל - Eshbaal - "Man of Baal" - 4th son of King Saul as the name appears in Chronicles (in Samuel he is called איש בושת - derogatory name to replace the word "Baal"). The Bible does not explain ...


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I'd sooner suspect that the correct interpretation of ישי - Jesse is "יש שי" meaning "there is a gift", for example, describing the birth of the child - similar to by Leah's naming of her son Issachar - יש שכר" = יששכר" meaning "there is a reward".


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Some midrashim often fill in the names of minor characters. One prominent example is Sefer Hayashar. Thus, all the names of the wives of Yaakov's sons are listed in chapter 45: And so in many other places. However, in the case of Tzippora's sisters, Sefer Hayashar, chapter 76 does not list it. Rather, verse 14 just describes them as the seven daughters of ...


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From here: "The Septuagint renders חַוָּה as Ζωή (Zo-ay or Zoe -- literally meaning "life" חיּה ). But the name became Ἕυα (Evah or Eve) in other Greek translations. The Tyndale uses Heua, which is related to Eua -- where we get Eve. Eue or Euan in Greek could either be a simple mis-transliteration, or perhaps the Eu- prefix could hint at the Greek ...


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