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10

Rabbi Ribiat (The 39 Melochos) defines Muktza Machmas Chesron Kis as Items or utensils that one would generally not handle at any time because of their fragility or great value. Items that (because they are fragile or valuable) would not be used for anything other than their specific non-permissible uses, and are not left "lying around" between ...


9

I have heard that Rabbi Avraham Yosef Shlita has said in a Shiur that it is not Muktze, since this is the way people eat it.


9

Shulchan Aruch Harav implies that to be muktzeh machmas chesron kis an object must also be "melachto l'issur" See here


8

Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (Meoray Eish and Minchas Shlomo 14) sides that technically as far as the laws of Muktzah are concerned it is permitted. However in a footnote he writes "All what I have written is only a discussion and not to be relied on, for all of Israel refrained all these years from moving an electric light on Shabbos and it appears as uvdin ...


8

The Aruch Hashulchan (308:3-5) quotes Tosafos in Bava Kama who says that it was initially only a temporary enactment: בימי נחמיה בן חכליה שהיו פרוצים בחילול שבתות מהזמן שהיו בבבל, עמד הוא ועזרא וחגי זכריה ומלאכי ואנשי כנסת הגדולה וגזרו על דורם עוד חומרות, ולא התירו רק ג' כלים. ולא היתה גזירות קבועות לדורות, וכן כתבו מפורש רבותינו בעלי התוספות בבבא קמא (צ"ד: ...


8

1. Ba'al HaMaor (Shabbat, Perek Kirah) שכל איסור והתר שמטלטל האיסור מצד ההיתר נקרא טלטול מן הצד Every case of something forbidden [to move] and something permitted where he moves the forbidden thing by way of the permitted thing, is called tiltul min hatzad. The above is my translation; my sense is that Ba'al HaMaor translated min hatzad as 'by way ...


7

From a piece by Rabbi Gil Student about robots on shabbos: R. Shlomo Zalman Auerbach, according to one report, considered thought that directs a forbidden labor, such as via machines that read brain waves, to be forbidden (Me’orei Eish Ha-Shalem 10:13 pp. 765-766; pp. 893-895).


7

In lieu of an authoritative source which directly addresses this question I will offer the following hypothesis: It seems to me that the status of a "כלי שמלאכתו לפיקוח נפש" (a utensil used for cases of pikuach nefesh) is dependent, in part, to the disagreement whether cases of Pikuach nefesh means Shabbos is הותרה (the action is permitted) or whether ...


7

Hinting to a non jew to help you (without telling them explicitly) could do the trick. Before you find someone to remove the battery place a chair underneath ceiling where the smoke alarm is. Although it could be considered dangerous to have a non-functioning smoke alarm over shabbat, it may be a temporary solution before you can replace the battery. If its ...


6

I would like to add that the mishna brura in 'סימן שח' סעיף קטן יב says that one should not use an item that is a kli shemelachto lissur if a kli that is muttar is available. So this question can only be relevant if one doesn't have a watch.


6

The gemara (Shabbos 47a) explicitly permits reassembling tools that are easily and intentionally taken apart and reassembled as part of their normal use (such as fold-out beds; see also Rambam Hilchos Shabbos 22:26). Also, even a kli shemlachto l'issur (utensil devoted to purposes forbidden on Sabbath) such as a screwdriver, is allowed to be used l'tzorech ...


6

In this situation the application of graf shel rei (bedpan) would apply. The Shulchan Aruch Orach Chayim 308:35 allows one to move a graf shel rei out of sight or smell . This is a special halacha which allows one to move something which one would usually not be allowed to move since it has no use, but since it is something which is disgusting and unsightly ...


5

I had thought the answer was "absolutely yes" (i.e., you cannot pet even your own dog on Shabbos), but I checked two of my Shabbos seforim and the Internet and found a bit of nuance. Volume 2, Part V of The Concise Code of Jewish Law: Compiled from the Kitzur Shulhan Aruch and Traditional Sources by Rabbi Gersion Appel says this: "All animals including ...


5

A basis is a basis only if its owner put something muktze on it on purpose. (Usually.) So bugs wouldn't count. Source: Mishna B'rura 309:13 (and there in the Shulchan Aruch).


5

If the charger has an indicator light it would obviously be forbidden as unplugging would extinguish it. Even if not, phone chargers utilize electricity even when the phone is not plugged in. Consequently unplugging would interrupt the flow of electricity and would most probably be forbidden on Shabbos under the general minhag/uvdin dechol prohibition of ...


5

Shulcan Aruch HaRav 638:12 All the above [leniencies] apply [only] to the decoration of the sukkah, but not to the branches used for the actual s'chach. A stipulation to make use of them is never effective, even if the sukkah collapses during the eight days of the festival, for the prohibition against [using] this is of Scriptural origin, as stated above. ...


5

I've never done this before (that I recall), but I have just found what I consider to be the definitive answer to my own question. In this Shi'ur on the subject, it is clear that: A. Muktzeh MeḤamath Ḥisaron Kis is not defined in the way many might think it is. These are the different keilim which are chisaron kis: • Keilim (used for an issur) one is ...


5

In terms of moving the object, you should be fine as it is 'kilachar yad' (moving in a abnormal way). In terms of the drawer, if the muktza thing was the only or most important thing in the drawer it becomes a basis for the muktza item and is muktza as well. If there were other things in the drawer of higher importance than the muktza does not dominate and ...


5

In the sefer Rishumei Aahron(Rav Aahron Felder) chelek 2 pg 27 he brings from Rav Moshe that it is mutar to move a lamp(with a cord) on Shabbas lzorech gufo and mimkomo.


5

They are correct. Any device which is specially used for making noise is muktzah. See the Ramma in siman 338 siff two with Shaar Hatzion #4. This is further explained in Shmiras Shabbos Kehilchasa chapter 28 paragraph 34 as being muktzah even when not producing a musical sound. He classifies them as a kli shemilachto l'issur which would mean they are ...


4

Roughly, muktze things are those that one can't or won't use on Shabas. There are several broad categories of this: if a particular object doesn't fall into one of these, it's not muktze. Valuable or fragile. If something is particularly valuable, or particularly fragile, so that handling it will ruin it, and it's not going to be used on Shabas, then it's ...


4

R. Menashe Klein writes in Mishneh Halachos 11:304 that one is allowed to turn off the alarm on a mechanical alarm clock on Shabbos, even while the alarm is sounding. He writes that this is not a problem of "extinguishing", rather it is merely preventing the alarm from ringing more. (In 13:49 he makes clear he is talking only about mechanical alarm clocks ...


4

This short article addresses the general problem of bells on Shabbath, and yes they are prohibited for adults to use. However, this answer addresses toys that would otherwise be Muktzeh and explains that, if they are essentially children's toys, they are not Muktzeh for adults. I should add, though, that I've seen in the Sefer Shemirath Shabbath ...


4

I'm not observant, but I live in a NY suburb and the tragic loss of seven children and the anguish of their father while their mother and an eighth child struggle for their lives has been the lead story on the news since Saturday morning. According to news reports, the home had no functioning smoke detectors. Apparently the fire was started by a hot plate ...


4

Someone I know, who knows halacha, suggested to me tentatively that a smoke detector is movable (it is a keli shem'lachto l'heter or, at worst, a keli shem'lachto l'isur, still movable under the circumstances) and that one could remove it from the wall (if it's not screwed in, as many are not) and hide it in a room where it will not be heard. He was ...


4

The Gemora (Beitza 2b) explains that since Yom Tov in general is more lax than Shabbos, they were more stringent about mutkzah in order that people should not disregard it. See Shulchan Aruch Harav (OC 495:13) for the various opinions l'halacha.


4

It seems From the Igros Moshe OC 5:22:21 that pets are different and are not like other animals which are muktzah see the tshuvah inside it is very short. It is worth noting that the word pets in the teshuva was added on during editing. The reason for the edit to the teshuva is from stance that Rav Moshe changed his opinion on the matter and was more ...


4

Let's assume we're not dealing with wrapping paper. (E.g. put it in a nice gift bag instead.) And other muktza-type issues have been addressed (there was the non-Jewish guest who brought cut flowers, and the hostess asked her nicely to set them down on the countertop as you can't put them in water on shabbos!) Similarly, if the gift was outside the ...


4

Money is not muktzah because it is legal tender - it is muktzah because it has no intrinsic use (See Mishna Berura 310:24). Money fits into the broader category of anything which is not a כלי, a vessel, which is not allowed to be carried on Shabbos (Rema O.C. 308:7). This would seemingly include your coin, which has no intrinsic use. However, even ...


4

On Yom Kippur, there is a special rule concerning meal preparation. But apart from this all is identical to Shabbat. Megila mishna 1, 5: אֵין בֵּין שַׁבָּת לְיוֹם הַכִּפּוּרִים אֶלָּא שֶׁזֶּה זְדוֹנוֹ בִּידֵי אָדָם וְזֶה זְדוֹנוֹ בְּכָרֵת : ‏ There is no difference between sabbath and the day of atonement save only that the deliberate violation of ...


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