6

R David Brofsky in his Hilkhot Avelut p. 192 quotes R Yosef Blau (Memories of a Giant) as explaining R Yosef Soloveitchik was puzzled why there were 12 months of aveilut for a parent who had lived a long full life compared to the one of a child, far more devastating, which lasts only 30 days. R Blau gives a number of answers that he heard from the ...


4

The simple answer is that Mordechai was obeying a command from a king. The general rule is Dina D'malchusa Dina, which obligates Jews to obey the laws of the land they live in. Here the king commanded that Mordechai be rewarded, so he accepted the reward. Esther was not giving Mordechai a command as queen when she sent him clothes, so he did not have to ...


4

While not a halachic source, per se, the Gemara in Yevamos 46b discusses the Tevilah and Milah as being prerequisites to being "נכנס תחת כנפי השכינה". Considering the text of the Kel Malei (המצא מנוחה נכונה תחת כנפי השכינה) it stands to reason that one cannot recite this tefillah for non-Jews, who have not performed Tevilah and Milah (two ...


4

Friedman and Yehuda's The Art of Jewish Pastoral Counseling , p. 96, addresses something to this effect. (While the book aims for an ecumenical pastoral voice, the footnotes always mention Orthodox halacha.) The halachos of shiva still apply, but it doesn't need to be observed the common way. They suggest that the mourner mentally frame it as "grieving for ...


3

Rav Asher Weiss ruled (listen here) that it's permissible. His reasoning was that if anything, it generates some sadness. You long to be there in person by watching. He felt it's not considered being there by halachic definition. He said it wasn't a mitzvah to attend, but it's legitimate. In some instances he would recommend it. I'm sure we could find ...


2

In his recent and excellent book Hilkhot Avelut, R David Brofsky writes (p. 114, in the section Mourning for abusive or estranged relatives) While mourning might seem to be the most natural reaction to the death of a close relative, at times, a person may wish not to mourn, either because their relation to the deceased was strictly biological, or due ...


2

The Lechem shamayim that you quote seemingly answers your question. His discussion is about who should initiate the nechama during the shiva. i.e. when a person goes to be Menachem avel, should he start speaking or should he wait for the avel to start? He says that during the shiva we should wait for the avel to indicate that he wants to start talking. ...


1

You are asking whether a Jewish son should mourn his righteous non-Jewish father to whom he owes gratefulness for having raised him and supported his Jewish growth. It is clear that there is no halakhic obligation to mourn for a non-Jew, at the same time certain mourning rites might be appropriate. R David Brofsky in his book Hilkhot Avelut (p. 109) writes ...


1

The Gra on Megilas Eshter 5:8 explains that the reason Esther requested a second wine party before she revealed her request to Achasvarosh was that she was afraid Hashem would not agree with her asking Achasvarosh to help. She was stalling to see if Hashem would send her a sign, which He did in the form of Haman leading Mordechai on the king's horse. I think ...


1

The poskim - see for instance Rambam Hilchos Tefillin 2(11) - bring a source (Yerushalmi last perek of Eiruvin - Kesef Mishnah) that Hillel (some say Shammai) used his grandfather's tefillin without needing to check them. That is part of a discussion there whether tefillin need checking in general, or how often. I don't know that it had anything to do with ...


1

There's plenty of Sephardic Halacha on Halachipedia.


1

The Pnei Baruch brings down that an ovel should ideally not leave the shiva house during the week of the shiva even for a dvar mitzvah. He brings the Terumas HaDeshen 290 where he notes that the concern is that the ovel may forget that he is in mourning whilst he is outside of the shiva environment. However that being said, he says here (letter zayin) that ...


1

Nitei Gavriel Aveilus-1 108:1 says that an Aveil during the Shiva is not supposed to sit on a regular chair. Sources are Shach 387:1, Chochmas Adam 165:17, Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 211:1. 108:4 he mentions in the name of the Aruch HaShulchan that one who is weak, elderly, a pregnant lady or a nursing lady may sit on a regular chair. I am not aware of any ...


1

It appears from Chachmas Adam 153 with the paragraph starting with the words "מי שמת בתפיסה ולא ניתן לקבורה" that when the family can not bury the body... if the relatives give up on burying the deceased for whatever reason, the aveylus begins. it's possible to have implicit "giving up of hope" and then aveylus begins. if they can not ...


1

Nitei Gavriel Aveilus1 85:11:14 brings in the name of the Brisker Rav that just going to visit the Aveil, even if nothing is said, is considered Nichum Aveilim.


1

It seems to me that "אבלי ציון וירושלים" are those who are in mourning of Tsion and Jerusalem - i.e. those who are suffering from the destruction of the Beit Hamikdash and the Galut, so it doesn't change anything if the bereaved, a fortiori the dead, is Jew or not. However there is allway the possibility to say as the Sefaradim are doing: "מן ...


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