10

First of all, I have to correct a common misconception in your question: that one must say Amen in order to fulfill one's obligation in the blessing. This is only true if the one saying the blessing is not fulfilling his obligation then as well. In the vast majority of cases where the one saying the blessing is fulfilling his obligation with you, you can ...


6

The barebone Halacha is in Yoreh De'ah 228 - סימן רכח - דיני התרת נדרים - where it says that all that the 3 people need to say is מֻתָּר לָךְ - preferably thrice. So I'm not sure what the others were saying but as long as they said מֻתָּר לָךְ (or similar, in any language) even once, the hataras nedarim is valid. My guess: They either say it often and ...


6

In general, If there is a halachic doubt as to whether to say a bracha it is better to answer Amen to someone else's bracha then to say it yourself. This way you avoid the possibility of making a bracha levatala. This is done Shavuos morning: someone who slept will be motzi those who stayed awake with birchos hatorah, elokai netzor and ha'maavir shaina. (...


6

As mentioned in the comments, the Mishnah is just talking about one who reads the megillah. Someone who is falling asleep while listening will not be able to hear every word. The Shulchan Aruch is clear on this: קראה מתנמנם, הואיל ולא נרדם בשינה, יצא. אבל אם שמעה מתנמנם, לא יצא.‏ This still doesn't answer the question of how much focus you need to be ...


4

AhS OH 213:6 And thus is the halachah and the widespread custom that one does not discharge another's obligation in any [brachah], and each makes his own brachah, since even for "Hamotzi" and birkas ha-mazon, there are few in our time [who follow the practice of] one being motzi another, and all the more so for other things. He goes on to cover be-di-...


4

The Yalkut Yosef (Shabbat 296:13) holds that women are equally obligated for the mitzvah of havdalah as men are, and can therefore say all of the blessings and drink from the wine to fulfill the mitzvah for themselves. In the footnote for this halacha, R. Yosef adds that this is like the law for kiddush (as hazoriz stressed). Although the Yalkut Yosef does ...


4

I attended a halacha shiur when I was in yeshiva that addressed this issue. I believe that the posek that my rav was quoting was Rav Ovadiah Yosef zt"l; however, unfortunately, I lost my notes from that shiur, so I cannot confirm that this is correct. He said that, in general, one should not hear kiddush from someone who is mechalel shabbat; however, if a ...


3

I think @Scimonster is misunderstanding. Shulchan Aruk Ha Rav (SAHR) 190/5 says you have to drink from the cup of blessing: שולחן ערוך הרב אורח חיים סימן קצ סעיף ה ...אף על פי שמצוה מן המובחר שכל המסובים יטעמו מכוס של ברכה And later ibid he says that if you are not drinking from the main cup, and you have your own cup in front of you - These cups become a ...


3

Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 271:14 says that it's a worthy practice (mitzvah min hamuvchar) for everyone to have some wine at kiddush. ... וּמִכָּל מָקוֹם מִצְוָה מִן הַמֻּבְחָר שֶׁיִּטְעֲמוּ כֻּלָּם. ... ibid:16 and :17 together make it clear that each person is allowed to drink from their own cup, without even requiring the leader to pour some of his ...


3

It is based on the difference between a tefillah and a bracha. The difference is that one can be yotzi when someone recites a bracha (as with hamotzi) but must recite a tefila personally (as with shmona esrai) unless with a minyan and in extraordinary circumstances (which is the basis of chazaras Hashatz) We see at Kollel Shaarei Horaah HaRav Shmuel ...


3

Although in Hilchos Sefiras Ha'Omer we find that one makes a bracha based on a sfek sfaka (Mishne Berura 489:38), in general one may not rely on a sfek sfakah to make a bracha (Mishne Berura 215:20). Rav S.Z. Auerbach (Halichos Shlomo, Pesach 11, note 24) explains that with Sefiras Ha'Omer nearly all Poskim agree that one makes a bracha even if he forgot to ...


3

Mishna Berura covers this exact scenario regarding havadalah in O.C. 296:8 s.k. 36. He says someone who has already made havdalah, or already heard havdalah, should not make it again on behalf of ladies unless there is at least a child there to listen (seemingly from the standpoint of chinuk), because one opinion holds that women aren't obligated in havdalah ...


3

We're discussing making an eruv techum. That type says "my home vis-a-vis where I can walk on shabbos isn't here, it's some place east of here where I dropped off some matza." That gives you plenty of walking space to the east, but then limits your walking distance to the west more so than had you made no eruv. As making such an eruv limits you in some ways, ...


3

The following is from Mishnah Demai 4:2. The translation is mine, following Bartenura. To keep things straight I’m referring to the people in question as Reuven and Shimon instead of “him” and “him.” הַמַּדִּיר אֶת חֲבֵרוֹ שֶׁיֹּאכַל אֶצְלוֹ, וְהוּא אֵינוֹ מַאֲמִינוֹ עַל הַמַּעַשְׂרוֹת, אוֹכֵל עִמּוֹ בַּשַּׁבָּת הָרִאשׁוֹנָה, וְאַף עַל פִּי שֶׁאֵינוֹ ...


2

Shulchan Aruch HaRav Hilchos Talmud Torah 3:12 says in part: וכל אדם צריך ליזהר להוציא בשפתיו ולהשמיע לאזניו כל מה שלומד בין במקרא משנה ותלמוד אלא אם כן בשעת עיון להבין דבר מתוך דבר וכל מה שלומד בהרהור לבד ואפשר לו להוציא בשפתיו ואינו מוציא אינו יוצא בלימוד זה ידי חובת מצות ולמדתם אותם And every person has to be careful to say the words with his lips and ...


2

R Braun (from the Crown Heights Beis Din) says that one does not fulfill the obligation to learn torah by listening to tapes.


2

Short answer: They may want to rely on the brocha of the master of the house on Shabbos in order to be included in his lechem mishna, although this may not be necessary, Long Answer: There are two types of brochos: 1) Birkos Hamitzvos; recited (usually) before performing a mitzva 2) Birkos Hanehenin; recited before and after having pleasure from something (...


2

Seemingly, it does not work. The Rema writes in O.C. 209:2: ואם היו אחרים שותים גם כן ויין לפניהם ודעתו גם כן על יין שהיה סבור שבכוסו יין ובירך בורא פרי הגפן ונמצא אחר כך שבכוסו מים או שכר כשחוזר ושותה אחר כך יין אין צריך לחזור ולברך ויוצא בברכה שבירך על כוסו אף על פי שהיתה בטעות דהא דעתו היה לשתות גם כן שאר יין גם הוציא האחרים ששותין שם ולכן ברכתו ברכה If ...


2

Is havdalah the same? Must one hear havdalah made by one who is obligated in havdalah? Generally, yes. However, a minor who has not yet said/heard any form of havdala is considered obligated by the rabbis to do so, as is a man who has already said/heard havdala without a cup of wine or the like, so the former person can say it for the latter. Sh'miras ...


2

Yes, you may. See Shulchan Aruch siman 273 siff 4 'One may make kidush for others even though he is not eating with them, because for them it is kidush in the place they are eating. And even though the blessing on wine cannot normally be made for others if he is not drinking along with them, since this borei pro hagafen is necessary for kidush, it has the ...


1

Halichos Shlomo on Tefila quotes Reb Shlomo Zalman Auerbach as saying it works. See there 22:11.


1

To the best of my knowledge, even having the voicebox removed, a person can whisper and to hear himself whisper, which is more than enough make him Yotze for himself. Note, that for Mitzvos that require an action, like putting Teffilin or lighting Channuka candles, the reciting of the Berocho is not Meakev. Only for Mitzvos, where the saying IS the Mitzvah, ...


1

This is an attempt to answer following my lecture of the question. Following Rabenu Tam and RI (1), Shomea Keone is a an expression which has almost a literal sense. If you use "the shomea keone din" when you are in middle of a passage in which you cannot interrupt, the result of shomea keone is that you made an interruption despite your silence. So, the ...


1

I was told by a Rav of my community that we could rely on him making it for us. He said that in general this depends on the community.


1

The laws are brought in O Ch 146 (2) MB [8] and [14]. MB[8] allows one to learn quietly and to do “shnayim mikro v'echod targum” during the communal Torah reading as long as there are ten people who are paying attention to the reading. So under those circumstances it is “just a good thing to do” to listen and certainly not a sin to “study the commentaries”...


1

The gemara in succah 27b says that one does not have to own the succah to fulfill his obligation as the passuk says כל האזרח בישראל ישבו בסוכות With chanuka candles, there must be candle(s) lit for each household. This is the meaning of נר איש וביתו (shabbos 21b). When candles are lit for a household, all who are associated fulfill their obligation. A ...


1

This is discussed in Shulchan Aruch 213:3 it seems one has to,hear every word and the motzei has to have the yotzei in mind.The Mishna Brurah seems to say the same,but the Shar Hatziyon 20 brings that missing some word one can still yotzei bdeieved,but not miss the ikar of the bracha ,like Baruch atah... It is best to see the halachas inside and see how your ...


1

I've heard of a case where somebody in a coma was aware of things happening around him, but couldn't respond in any way. This person eventually recovered and thanked the chaplain for sending someone to read the Megillah for him on Purim. Other people saying the viduy probably does nothing by itself, but if the patient can hear and say it together with them ...


1

The Ben Ish Chai Writes in Tetzaveh Hilchos Purim 3: אות ג קראה מתנמנם הואיל ולא נרדם בשינה יצא אבל השומע אם מתנמנם לא יצא וצריך להזהר בד"ז שהוא מצוי תמיד דאלו השומעים יתנמנמו, ולכתחילה אם ראו את הקורא שקרא איזה פסוקים מתנמנם מכריחין אותתו שיחזור ויקראנה, דלא אמרינן קראה מתנמנם יצא אלא בדיעבד היכא דסיים קריאת המגילה כולה: If one is dozing off ...


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