37

The Mishna Brura OC 549 sk 3 says to continue fasting if you accidentally ate. In OC 568 sk 3 he says you can still say Aneinu at Mincha if it is a public fast day (as opposed to a personal one). In OC 568 sk 8 he says that you do not need to fast again on a different day for accidental eating on the public fasts as well as any personal fast that has a ...


18

The luchot are a 1 amah cube of sapphire (6x6x6 tefachim) (Baba Basra 14a) 3x6x6 tefachim individually (Baba Basra 14a) The writing filled each side ("tradition". I think I saw this in a Gemara too) There are more words in the first 5 commandments, so the letters were a smaller size to fit.(Mabit) The letters were carved straight through the luchot. (Shmot ...


17

Indeed, the Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l (sicha of Shabbos Parshas Ki Tisa 5741 secs. 55-57) called for them to always be depicted as square, in keeping with the Gemara you mentioned. (And Chabad publications long before that, as far back as 1942 at least, followed the same convention.) He states that shape with rounded tops was popularized by non-Jewish printers....


15

This idea, that it's based on a mistaken expansion of 'בשב (meaning 'בשמואל ב) to mean בשבת, comes from R. Baruch Epstein's Mekor Baruch. However, it is demonstrably untrue. The custom of alternating between מגדיל on weekdays and מגדיל on Shabbos is mentioned by Avudraham, who lived in the 14th century. (He doesn't mention the custom of doing so on Yom Tov ...


15

Mishna Berura on SA OC 104 sk 2: ‏ (ב) בתפלתו ואפילו במקום הפסד ממון אין לו להפסיק. כתב הח"א כלל כ"ה סעיף ט' העומד בתפלה ונסתפק באיזה דין איך יתפלל כגון ששכח איזה דבר בתפלה מותר לילך ממקומו למקום מיוחד ולעיין שם בספר ואם מותר לשאול הדין צ"ע ונ"ל ‏דמותר (עד כאן לשונו של החיי אדם):‏ The Chaye Adam wrote (klal 25, paragraph 9): One who ...


14

Mishna in Makoth 2:7 וְכֹהֵן גָּדוֹל שֶׁהָרַג , אֵינוֹ יוֹצֵא מִשָּׁם לְעוֹלָם A Cohen Gadol who kills goes to the Ir Miklat forever. They would have to appoint another one, to do the Avoda on Yom Kippour, as the first one loses his job as Kohen Gadol, as the Rambam הלכות רוצח ושמירת נפש at (7:14) says about all those sentenced to Ir Miklat, after they ...


12

(Source: this article on Torah.org) If the one who made the mistake is a Jew: Absolutely yes, you must return it. If the one who made the mistake is a non-Jew: there's lots of discussion, and it appears it's not so clear. But remember: doing so anyways will create a Kiddush Hashem (and is probably the right thing to do). To quote a relevant story retold ...


11

Tzitz Eliezer 12:38:2 concludes that there is no connection of Shemiras Shabbos with Havdala. Therefore even a Mechalel Shabbos can and should make Havdala.


11

Klilos Chasanim - page 79 in the name of Mesechtas Kallah Rabsi 1:1, Shaalos U'Teshuvos Peer Hador 9, Igros HaRam 23, Tanya Rabsai 91, Beer Haitaiv 62:3, Knesses Hagedola 9:3, Sidur Bais Oved says that if one skipped a Bracha of the Sheva Brachos you just say the skipped Bracha at that point as the order is not Meakaiv.


11

Rema ( OC 127:2): The Rema says that the custom is to say Sim Shalom during Shacharis and any other Tefillah that is fitting to have a Birkas Cohanim i.e. Mussaf (of Shabbos Rosh Codesh or Chag), and the Minchah of a Fast Day. Biur Halacha: a) The Minhag according to the Arizal (Chasidim) is to say Sim Shalom all the times. According to the ...


11

Rav Eliezer Melamed says that if the meat meal is finished and it is a matter of waiting the prescribed time (6 hours) then one should taste the hershey bar (or ice cream in his example) and rely on the Rishonim that say you don't have to wait rather than make a Beracha for no reason. This does not apply when one is in middle of a meat meal, as there is no ...


10

Rav Ovadia Yosef has a teshuva (Yabia Omer OC 7:54) on the former question (making up for a missed N'ila) dated 11 Tishrei 5748. He quotes Tosfot (Brachot 26a sv Iba'y) who gives two reasons that there is no tashlumin for a missed Musaf: because you can't say the verses related to the korbanot on the wrong day, and because Musaf was only established to take ...


10

R' Moshe Isserles, in Darchei Moshe 281 (in the middle of the paragraph), says one does not go back if they left out Nishmas. ועוד תקנו לומר נשמת ובמקהלות. ונראה דבכל זה אם לא אמר אין מחזירין אותו ויש לאמרו בקול נעים.‏ They also decreed that נשמת and ובמקהלות should be said. It appears that if they were skipped we do no make him go back. One ...


9

The Chinuch (Mitzvah 380) says that celebrating Pesach is so important because it showed the whole world that G-d is in control and powerful, and has the power to renew/create the world ex nihilo. G-d gave us Pesach to celebrate this. Since this lesson is so important, if one missed the opportunity G-d gave him another opportunity to celebrate this.


9

If you last ate meat at 1PM, and you normally wait 6 hours, then you can eat dairy at 7PM. It makes no difference what you've done in between. If you ate something you shouldn't have earlier, we don't penalize, but neither do we say you can eat whatever you want. Rinsing your mouth would probably be advisable, but not required -- nothing about "prohibited ...


9

Source: The Weekly Halacha Discussion Per Igros Moshe Orach Chaim 2:68, and Shmiras Shabbos K'Hilchoso 31:1 a non Jew may open the fridge for you due to Psik Reishei. Closing the fridge will cause the light to go off and is therefore prohibited. In a case where that it is a "Hefsed Meruba" large loss if the fridge remains open you are allowed to get a non ...


9

Rabbi Yair Hoffman has an analysis in the 5 Towns Jewish Times here (hat-tip to VIN for pointing me to it): The article views the question primarily around the issue of Onaah which it defines as 16.7% above or below market value (and possibly just a pricing mistake regardless). If that issue applied, then the sale would be invalid. The conclusion of the ...


8

In terms of deriving benefit from the actions done by a Jew on Shabbat the Shulchan Aruch (OC 318:1 and Mishna Berurah and Biur Halacha there) distinguish between a number of cases: If a biblical prohibition was violated purposefully (deoraita bemeizid) then no one can derive benefit from it for the rest of shabbat, and the violator himself cannot derive ...


8

I don't know of any prayers for such cases (other than ones regarding the lack of Temple services), there are many cases where one might be inclined to use something else instead (like using a lemon instead of an Esrog). In certain cases, it seems like it is better to 'fake it', so to speak, so as to do something even if it isn't the mitzvah, while in other ...


8

"Purification?" No. (And this kind of thinking has unfortunately lead to OCD in some people.) Technically, if I eat a non-kosher-slaughtered chicken, that renders me "ritually impure", and I can't enter the Temple until I do a ritual bath and wait until nightfall; but those laws are generally moot with regards to the world in which we live today. Eating ...


8

The Mishna Berurah at the end of siman 282 brings the Darkei Moshe that one does not go back if he skipped Nishmas, but is allowed to say it after Shmonah Esrei if he wants. In the Biur Halacha he says if one remembers that he skipped it before he says Baruch atah Hashem Kel Melech etc, he should go back and say it in order.


8

The Be'er Hetev that you quote says that if Saturday night is before the third of the month, Kiddush Levana should be pushed off to the next Saturday night because it will still be before the 11th of the month (and we don't usually push off Kiddush Levana to Saturday night if it will be after the 11th of the month for fear of a few days of clouds). But he ...


7

Something that might bear on this is in Proverbs (26:4-5): "Do not answer a fool according to his folly, lest even you become like him. Answer a fool according to his folly, lest he be wise in his sight." Noting the obvious contradiction, the Talmud (Shabbos 30b) points out that the first statement is referring to "worldly matters," the second to Torah ...


7

To add a source to Shalom's answer: In The Kosher Kitchen, the author writes that it is a common misconception, but eating dairy after meat does not "break" the required waiting time (of whatever that person holds - e.g. 6 hours). The full amount of time must still elapse before eating more dairy.


7

I always learned that yes people mistook it saying Shmuel Bet (22:51) instead of Tehillim (18:51) (the pasuk appears twice, with this small change) and started saying it on Shabbat. However I found this source which says that the study of Ketuvim was forbidden on Shabbat and therefore the Shmuel verse had to be recited instead of the Tehillim verse, and ...


7

Shemiras Shabbos Kehilchoso (Edition published in 5770) Ch 10 (16) says that the food in the fridge is not forbidden to eat but you have to ask a shaaloh about closing the fridge. In note 48, he discusses the issues involved in closing the fridge.


7

Kaf HaChaim in siman 89 #8 writes in the name of דע׳ק If one forgets and starts to eat cheese during the six hours, he may finish and he does not need to stop. He also does not need to fast because of this mistake, being that there is no issue of eating issur here, it is merely a safeguard. Chacham Ovadia Yosef in his commentary on the Ben Ish Chai called ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch writes (OC 215:2) that one should not respond amen to a bracha recited by an adult Jew if שינה ממטבע הברכות he changed the way the bracha was coined. The Mishna Berura there notes that this is due to the fact that if he changed it too much that he would not fulfill his obligation, it is then a bracha levatala to which one is forbidden to ...


7

Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim 104:5–6 reads: If he paused [even silently —MB] [amid of sh'mone esre enough time] to finish the entire [sh'mone esre], he goes back to the start [of sh'mone esre]; otherwise, he goes back to the start of the b'racha he paused in. But if he stopped in [one of] the first three [b'rachos], he goes back to the start; [in one of] ...


7

I'd like to answer along two dimensions, one about capital punishment and one more broad. First, it is possible for the conditions to be met under which capital punishment can apply. Tractate Sanhedrin in the talmud discusses in great detail the relevant laws. We know that sentences of capital punishment were carried out in the past. They were rare, with ...


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