16

You are right. There is a Shita of the Meiri Bais HaBechira in Megila that says that on Parshas Shekalim you should only take out one Sefer Torah. I imagine that the reason the Shulchan Aruch mentions that we use two Sefer Torahs is because of Lo Pelug.


13

Sefer HaToda'ah (The Book of Our Heritage) says that taking out multiple scrolls would seem unnecessary when the second portion is in close proximity to the first. Never-the-less, he says that the custom is to take out multiple Torahs.


10

Rashi in Pesachim 56a writes that Sefer HaRefuos was hidden because their hearts were not humbled over their illness but were, rather, healed immediately. Rambam in Peirush Hamishna (Pesachim 4:10) rejects this approach arguing that just as one may not hold back food from the hungry, so too one may not withhold healing from the ill. Instead, Rambam writes ...


9

I thought of two possible answers, and am happy to see that they are both supported by Mefarshim here: Because we were just released from being slaves in Egypt: התחיל המשפט הראשון בעבד עברי, מפני שיש בשילוח העבד בשנה השביעית זכר ליציאת מצרים הנזכר בדבור הראשון, כמו שאמר בו: וזכרת כי עבד היית בארץ מצרים ויפדך י״י אלהיך על כן אנכי מצוך את הדבר הזה היום (...


8

Apparently although the Mechilta understood the prohibition to be kidnapping it still recognizes the literal meaning of theft. This is implied by this mechilta and also somewhat implied by this mechilta.


7

Abarbanel explains (in my own loose translation): …and so gave another rule related to Sukos, saying "You shall not boil a kid in its mother's milk".… It seems to me… that idolators would do this when they got together: that is, they'd boil kids in milk when they harvested grain, thinking that they would thereby appeal to their ...


7

The entire point of reading Parashat Shekalim is to "announce" that Adar/Nissan are on the way, and as a reminder of the באחד באדר, משמעין על השקלים. As the Meiri Bais HaBechira in Megila (on the 12th line) says: והוצאת הספר נותנת היכר לכל על ענין הפרשה - Taking out [the 2nd] Sefer Torah creates an awareness for everybody about the [added] Parsha. I.e.: ...


7

The Sheiltot (R. Achai Gaon, 8th c.) says that although a parent can forgo his honor, he cannot forgo the prohibition against striking and cursing. שאלתות (פ׳ משפטים סוף סא): האב שמחל על כבודו, כבודו מחול, ה״מ כבודו, אבל הכאתו וקללתו, לא. The Minchat Chinuch (R. Joseph Babad, 19th c.), on the other hand, holds that a father can forgo the prohibition against ...


7

Both Rav Hirsch and the Netziv point out the word change and explain that Salma signifies a more dignified form of clothing. Rav Hirsch connected it to Tzelem as in Tzelem Elokim. Whereas Simla is simply clothing to cover ones nakedness.


7

Based on Tanchuma, Rashi claims that by gazing at the throne of Hashem, they sinned, but due to the solemn atmosphere of the covenant, their death sentence was suspended until they brought the alien fire (Vayikra 10:1–2). Regarding why their two other brothers didn't go, the Artscroll Chumash brings the following explanation: Tur comments that God ...


7

Indeed, the classic Jewish understanding of this verse is that "Yatza [Yasa] Yeladeha" means the incitement of a miscarriage, which is only liable to a fine, not the death penalty. This is evident from the Talmud in Kesubos 29b, that learns from this verse, the concept of "Kim Lei Bederaba Minei" - when a person is faced which multiple punishments for a ...


6

The Malbim explains simply that אם means it's a possiblity and might not happen. Maybe you won't have any money to lend or nobody will need a loan.


5

As Rashi explains in ברכות on 10b and in פסחים on 56a: שגנז ספר רפואות לפי שלא היה לבם נכנע על חולים אלא מתרפאין מיד People would not take the illness as a stimulus to do Teshuva, rather they would immediately look up the cure - and lose the divinely-sent lesson of the illness.


5

Good question. A freed slave did not go to another master. He obtained the status of a full-fledged Jew. (In fact, many of the laws pertaining to converts in the Talmud are actually phrased as "converts and freed slaves.")


5

The Mechilta has a special Drasha to include a tumtum and androgen. אין לי אלא בן גמור ובת גמורה טומטום ואנדרוגינוס מניין ת׳ל או בן יגח או בת יגח. The Torah Temimah on the passuk #232 explains that the word או connotes a situation of uncertainty. יתכן דדריש או בן או בת אף כזה שהוא ספק בן או בת דהיינו טומטום ואנדרוגינוס.


5

This passage speaks of a case where men fighting negligently [due to their cations this is not considered an accident] caused a woman to have a miscarriage. Despite the death of the baby, the punishment is a fine, rather than a punishment for killing. They would be liable for additional damages if the woman was hurt. If the baby was born and lived but was ...


5

Rambam (based on Kiddushin 25a) writes (Avadim 5:4 (English)): כיצד בראשי אברים: המכה את עבדו בכוונה, וחיסרו אחד מעשרים וארבעה אברים שאינן חוזרין--יצא לחירות, וצריך גט שיחרור. אם כן למה לא נאמר בתורה אלא "שן" (שמות כא,כז) ו"עין" (שמות כא,כו), לדון מהן: מה שן ועין, מומין שבגלוי ואינן חוזרין--אף כל מום שבגלוי שאינו חוזר, יצא העבד בו לחירות.‏ How is ...


5

Rambam ends his Laws of the Murderer and Preservation of Life actually saying it's not about the donkey -- it's about this guy might get stuck on the road at night and it would be dangerous for him. As someone being stuck on the highway could also be in danger, I would think it's very much within the spirit of the law: ואף על פי שעדיין לא עשה תשובה--אם ...


4

The gemara in Yevamos 49b asks a similar contradiction between that verse and the description of Yeshayahu (6:1) in which he states that he saw Hashem. The gemara says that this is no contradiction because Moshe had a clear lens through which he saw Hashem whereas Yeshayahu's was unclear. This is understood to mean that since Moshe's perception was so clear ...


4

Malbim clearly says it refers to a miscarriage ("ויצאו ילדיה ולא יהיה אסון אין לפרש דוקא ילדיה הרבים דסתם הרה אין מפלת רק ולד אחד"). I haven't had a chance to check other commentaries, but I've always understood it to refer to a miscarriage. However, as avi notes, the translation is simply "and her children came out" with no medical explanation given.


4

See אמת ליעקב by Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetsky who explains that this has to do with the teachings Yeshiva of Ever (Eber) whose students were unaffiliated by family or origin, only by their actions and beliefs, like a slave who is unaffiliated in his low stature. The term Yisroel denotes an exalted person and all people who bear that name are related by ...


4

I am going to point to a different mitzvah - Ben sorer umoreh requires that both parents willingly transport the child to Beis Din for both the initial warning and the final judgement. If either relents or refuses, the child cannot be punished. No such dispensation is provided for in the case of cursing or hitting your parents. @Shokhet notes that the ...


4

As you mentioned, "רפואה" can mean both things: healing an existing disease, or preventing a future one. Rashi himself asks your question. He brings the midrash, which reads the passuk as "I will put none of the sicknesses upon thee... (yet if I will, it will be as though I didn't), for I am the LORD that healeth thee." The Siftei Chachamim explain that ...


4

The Maharal in Gur Aryeh explains that the use of אם which connotes רשות as explained in Rashi quoted above by the OP, is meant to signify how one is meant to do charity. Meaning that although it is an obligation to give charity, nonetheless the Torah uses this pharesology of אם to tell us that when one does charity, his giving should not be done out of "...


4

1. Why is a slave sold for six years? Because the Torah decided so. Maybe because 6 years is a full cycle - as we see that the agricultural cycle is 6 years and in the 7th year everything stops for a year (Shmitta). Note that the slave's 6 years and the Shmitta cycles are independent. A slave works during Shmitta if it's within his 6 years.Source הלכות ...


4

No, there are not. Yovel had ceased to be operative centuries earlier and the rules of Jewish slaves became inoperative with it (Rambam, Avadim 1:10). The institution of a Hebrew maid-servant and that of a Hebrew servant is not practiced except in the time when the Jubilee year is observed. This applies both to a Hebrew servant who sells himself, and ...


4

As I answered here: Rather than command us to put witches to death (just like any other death penalty in the Pentateuch) the bible here instructs others (perhaps the courts) to not let any witches live, which seems to be a simple translation of this verse from Hebrew to english. Rashbam notes that this must be a specific instruction given to others ...


3

Ba'al Ha Turim quotes a midrash, saying that Gd knew that Israel would sin and cause His Providence to depart. This would leave them vulnerable to the feral beasts of the field if they conquered the land too quickly. So future sins would keep Gd from preventing the animals from overrunning the land.


3

God is not physical and nobody can actually see him. Ideas such as "seeing God" are only in the Torah so that we can relate to what actually happened to some extent (Rambam Yesodei Torah Ch. 1). In each context, we have to understand what this "seeing" is referring to. This is the way I understand the difference: Mishpatim- Seeing God represents seeing the ...


3

The term used for a Tzaddik who suffers is "Tzaddik V'Ra Lo", literally (perhaps) "A Righteous one and bad is his". The Talmud uses the term to describe one who is righteous, but has bad things happen to him, i.e. "the righteous man who suffers". The Zohar reads it as the righteous one who has bad, i.e. one who still has some vestiges of his evil ...


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