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14

All three books (Iyov Mishlei and Tehillim) are written in a complex poetic style. The separate trop represents the shift from prose to poetry and may have been sung in a more songful manner than the regular prose trop. A proof to this distinction lies in Iyov, whose first, second and final chapters are written in prose and have regular trop. EDIT: The ...


12

There are many interpretations. Here are a few. Rashi connects the previous verse of making "beautiful bedspreads for herself; fine linen and purple wool are her raiment" with the this verse: ניכר הוא בין חביריו מפני מלבושיו שהם נאים He is recognizable among his peers because of his garments, which are beautiful. The verse is not out of place, ...


9

רמ"א, תורת העולה, ח"א פרק ו The Rema in תורת העולה, ח"א פרק ו says וכבר כתב חכם אחד שלא טעם טעם שמחה מי שלא טעם התרת הספיקות השכליות and a wise man said that someone who has not tasted the resolution of (intellectual?) doubt has not tasted joy, in connection with שמחת בית השואבה ! Metzudat David is from “18th century David Altschuler” and the ...


8

The Pele Yoetz answers this question by saying that if one can get a beautiful wife and she is also fearing of God then that is the best combination. I think he says the reason is that a pretty wife will help her husband from sinning. The rule of שקר החן is for someone who cannot find any God fearing wife except a non-pretty one, in that case we say שקר החן....


8

See the Otzer Dinim U'Minhagim quoted in this answer, discussing Shir HaShirim. Quoting Minhagei Yeshurun, one of the answers is that Friday night is the time of intimacy between a man and wife.


8

According to this website, the custom in the Jewish Tunisian community is to recite the "Eishet Chayil", after the reading of "Shir Hashirim" (Song of Songs) and in the Djerba community to recite it during the weeks of Sefirat HaOmer. [In many Sefardic communities, "Shir Hashirim" is recited weekly, after "Kabbalat Shabbat", before "Arvit". Some of the ...


7

I heard from Rav Yehoshua Neuwirth ZTL (author of Shmiras Shabbos Khilchoso), who ran one of the largest loan gemachs in Israel, that the second part of the passuk explains the first part. He explained (based on experience) as follows: Many people, when asked to sign as an arev (Guarantor ) for a loan for someone, especially for a friend, will not hesitate ...


6

The verse says, "עם שונים אל תתערב" - "Do not associate with שונים". The simplest translation of the term is "those who change (or differ)." The Targum translates the term as "שטיי", fools or madmen. (Targum uses the same term earlier (Proverbs 8:5) when translating the term כסילים.) The commentaries understand this in a number of ways. Most understand it ...


5

To add to Avrohom Yitzchok's answer: The B'nei Yissaschar (Sivan 5:13; cf. Kisleiv 3:19) attributes this statement to the Rambam: ואמר הרמב"ם מי שלא טעם טעם התרת הספיקות (בתורה) לא טעם שמחה מימיו Translation: And the Rambam said, "Whoever has not tasted the taste of resolving doubts (in Torah), has not tasted joy all his days." I don't know where in ...


5

Indeed, in a number of places here in Israel, Tehillim are read publicly on a daily basis from Tehillim scrolls written on parchment. According to many authorities, there is also a special bracha that is to be recited prior to reading material from Ketuvim out of a parchment scroll: ברוך אתה ה' א-להינו מלך העולם אשר קדשנו במצותיו וציונו לקרוא בכתבי הקודש (...


5

R. Dovber of Lubavitch writes (quoting his father, R. Shneur Zalman of Liadi) that these "dualists" are האנשים המפרידים ומחלקים ביראת השם ויראת המלך "those people who draw a distinction and division between fear of G-d and fear of the king" - which, as he goes on to explain, is incorrect: an earthly king's majesty is a reflection and outflow of the ...


4

In the Zohar it gives two related interpretations of this verse. First, the context it places this in is that this is a reference to The Jewish People as the Eishes Chayil. Within that, her husband is a reference to Hashem. Known in the gates, the Zohar then gives two ways to understand. One is שערים related to the word השערה - estimation. We can't truly ...


4

The Targum on Mishlei 2:4 translates תחפשנה as sitzb'yah - desire, suggesting that the analogy in Mishlei emphasizes that you should be highly motivated and driven. By contrast, yaga'ti seems to by definition refer to the actual work that someone retrospectively put in to acquire Torah. Note, however, that the Malbim (Mishlei, 2:4) distinguishes between ...


4

As LazerA points out very nicely, the word in question does not necessarily mean "Dualist" However, if you are reading the verse with that translation, then the following would be the answer to your question. 1) Dualist is a person who believes that there are two forces in the world, the Good and the Bad and that they are independent of each other. This ...


3

The logic would appear to be that "wisdom" as something that exists within the universe and is knowable by human beings has to be a creation of Hashem. Since Hashem is outside the universe and basically not understandable and knowable by human beings, then "wisdom" as something within the universe has to be created just as the sun, the moon, the stars and ...


3

Rabbi Levi Yitzchok Raskin in his notes (397) on the Baal Hatanya's Siddur, writes that these verses are out of order. He cites the Siddur of Rabbi Jacob Emden which does have the verses in the order of how they appear in Mishlei. He then cites the Shaar Hakolel, 22:7, (by Rabbi Abraham David ben Judah Leib Lavut, explains the reasons of the Baal Hatanya's ...


3

Try to follow the "rythm" of the whole pasuk: Chen and Yofi (if they come by themselves) in a women are either hevel or sheker (need some translation help with the nuances) but in contrast stands the woman who has Yirat Hashem. SHE will be praised. By saying Isha Yirat Hashem we understand that Chen and Yofi are connected to the Yisha. Now we need the SHE.


3

Rashi (31:31). He says that you can explain it as a mashal. He then starts explaining each pasuk once again.If you follow his commentary he explains how the text can be explained either as speaking of the Torah or about those that are asukim (involved) with the Torah.


3

As noted by @DannySchoemann, Ralbag writes in his commentary to Proverbs (24:16) that in this context, seven simply means many: הצדיק יפול פעמים רבות ויקום בכל פעם ופעם The righteous person will fall down many times, and get up every time. This seems to be the implication of Ibn Ezra (there) as well. This is also stated by R. Sa'adya Gaon in his ...


3

There's a Gemara about the Kohen who described the size of his sacrificial bread in terms of "a lizard's tail." That was considered uncouth, as lizards aren't kosher. So we may prefer to compare people to kosher animals. Grasshoppers -- well technically they're white locusts --are the smallest kosher animal you'd encounter on land.


3

The biblical commentator Rashi begins Proverbs 8 by explaining that the word "chochma"/"wisdom" in verse 1, "Will not wisdom call out, and understanding give forth its voice?" is referring to the Torah: Will not wisdom call out: Does not the Torah announce for you the things mentioned below in this section? All the statements below are made by the ...


3

While many of the European commentaries (e.g. Rashi, Ralbag, Metzudos, Malbim) and even recent translations do indeed seem to translate the verse as you have cited, the Talmud in Taanith 7b seems to interpret it with the opposite meaning: אמר רבי שמעון בן פזי: אין הגשמים נעצרין אלא בשביל מספרי לשון הרע שנאמר רוח צפון תחולל גשם ופנים נזעמים לשון סתר ...


3

According to the Etymological Dictionary of Biblical Hebrew, page 110. All brackets containing words are my expansion of their abbreviations; brackets containing ellipsis are skipping the examples provided, as they are irrelevant to the question. Italics are from the quote itself. ירא: fear; call to constant attention [explanation/commentary]: 1: ...


2

There is a story printed in Rabbi Zevin's Sippurei Chassidim (translated by Artscroll as "A Treasury of Chassidic Tales"). I haven't read it in a while, so I don't remember all the details, but here's what I do remember: The son of one of the Rebbeim (it might have been Ger or Belz) became Rebbe when his predecessor passed away. Some of the Chassidim were ...


2

See Mishna and Gemara in Taanit 26a, 31a ומה היו אומרות בחור שא נא עיניך וראה מה אתה בורר לך אל תתן עיניך בנוי תן עיניך במשפחה (משלי לא) שקר החן והבל היופי אשה יראת ה' היא תתהלל DO NOT SET THINE EYES ON BEAUTY BUT SET THINE EYES ON [GOOD] FAMILY. GRACE IS DECEITFUL, AND BEAUTY IS VAIN; BUT A WOMAN THAT FEARETH THE LORD, SHE SHALL BE PRAISED. ...


2

This is an answer based on my own interpretation of Aishes Chayil, so take it for what it's worth. I am a woman. I have always felt that Aishes Chayil was deliberately written with women as the intended audience. (Not saying it was or it wasn't actually written for women, just that it reads that way in a certain sense.) What I mean is that it focuses on ...


2

Malbim (ביאור המילות) writes on your first cited verse (Tehillim 105:45): ישמרו, ינצרו. הנוצר גדול מן השומר, והתורות צריכים שמירה יתירה יותר כי הם כוללות גם עקרי האמונה והלמודים "נצר" is a greater degree of "guarding" than "שמר;" because the תורות need to be guarded more because they also contain the main tenets of our faith and learning. (my ...


2

Proverbs 8:1-3 clearly states that what is coming afterwards (including 22-31) is the voice of wisdom and understanding, so it is not a statement about Moshiach, but rather a statement about the value of wisdom. The two Hebrew words for wisdom and understanding are Chochmah and Binah. This question explores the difference.


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