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R Shlomo Aviner answers your question (here) citing R Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (Shut Minchat Shlomo, last responsum in vol. 1) who writes that One is obligated to recite four blessings when the Messiah arrives: "Baruch…Chacham Ha-Razim – Blessed are You…Knowers of secrets" which is recited when seeing 600,000 Jews together and certainly at least ...


10

The first individual to know of the Messiah was Adam HaRishon. This is stated explicitly in Sanhedrin 38b in the name of Reish Lakish, by Yose ben Chalafta in Seder Olam Rabbah 30 and Rabbi Yehuda bar Simon in Bereshit Rabbah 24:2 which teach that Adam was shown all the righteous, each generation and its Sages and those who would teach and explain the Torah. ...


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According to the Arizal (cited, e.g. here), the name אדם - Adam, includes the acronym: א=אדם; ד= דוד; מ=משיח (or, speculatively perhaps מנחם=מ), representing his three gilgulim. This is understood to mean that Adam's potential role in history, upon failing by the original sin, was taken over historically by David. Upon David's failure, the role passes onto ...


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Chazal often took pesukim out of context to teach lessons homiletically; this is an example of that. Does this mean that they maintained that Isaiah 53 speaks of the Messiah? Simply not. Actually each school is choosing a name for the Messiah resembling in sound and meaning the name of that school or its head (see Rashi). One passage on Sotah 14a ...


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The verse says וַאֲנַ֣חְנוּ חֲשַׁבְנֻ֔הוּ נָג֛וּעַ, "and we considered him 'afflicted'," which the Talmud considers to a name of Moshiah. That didn't mean that the person described in the passage actually is the messaiah; his death proves that he is not. It just means that the people being spoken for in the prophecy thought that he would be the messaiah as ...


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