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The Rema in Yoreh Deah 363:1 writes: יש נוהגין לתת מעפר א"י בקבר (א"ז) (ויש למנהג זה על מה שיסמוכו) (מדרש תנחומא פ' ויחי) Some have the custom to place some earth from the Land of Israel in the grave (Refer to the Or Zaruah) (and this custom has a basis - see Midrash Tanchuma Parshas Vayechi) The Midrash writes over there a reference to the fact ...


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The History: According to Chabapedia (in Hebrew), the flag was first printed in the Hebrew year 5755 (1994-1995) by Yaakov Ben Ari of Tzfat, Israel. The general design of the flag seems to have originated in flags printed by the World Chabad Center in the 770 for Simchat Torah of 5753 (1992) on which was printed "Yechi Hamelech" (Long Live The King)...


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B"H The question of "reform jews" being heretic would be no different from a specific Jew being heretic (choss vishawloym), there are rules for determining who is considered such, if those rules and conditions are not fulfilled, regardless of whether the Jew identifies as "reform" (whatever exactly that would imply) or not doesn't ...


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You can read the book in its entirety here on the Internet Archive. You basically create an account for free and then you can borrow it like you would with an online library. Alternatively, a lot of it is accessible on Google Books here.


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The Rambam himself addresses this in that very same epistle (speaking about R' Saadiah Gaon's prediction), after quoting the same Gemara he references in Mishneh Torah: ואנו דנין את רב סעדיה לכף זכות ונאמר שמא מה שהביאו לעניין זה ואע"פ שהיה יודע שהתורה אסרה זה לפי שהיו בני דורו בעלי סברות רבות נשחתות וכמעט שתאבד תורת ה' לולי הוא ע"ה לפי שהוא גלה ...


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Really interesting thread. I think it does illustrate at least one reason why Chabad is "controversial": You can see from the comments that Chabad people have their traditions about the attitudes of the rest of the Orthodox world, and the rest of the Orthodox world sees those traditions as being inaccurate, out of touch. "Everyone else ...


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In Sha'ar Hasimchah of Orchot Tzadikim it states: הבטחון השביעי שיבטח על המלך מלכי המלכים המושל על כל ברוך הוא שיביא בימיו תשועה לישראל ויכונן ירושלים ויבנה בית המקדש בימיו The seventh trust is that he should trust of the king of kings who rules over all, blessed be He, that He will bring in his days salvation to Israel, and establish Jerusalem, and build ...


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The issue is adressed directly in the end of the tractate Eiruvin: תָּנוּ רַבָּנַן: הַכֹּל נִכְנָסִין בַּהֵיכָל לִבְנוֹת לְתַקֵּן וּלְהוֹצִיא אֶת הַטּוּמְאָה, וּמִצְוָה בְּכֹהֲנִים. אִם אֵין שָׁם כֹּהֲנִים — נִכְנָסִין לְוִיִּם, אֵין שָׁם לְוִיִּם — נִכְנָסִין יִשְׂרְאֵלִים. וְאִידֵּי וְאִידֵּי, טְהוֹרִין — אִין, טְמֵאִין — לָא. אָמַר רַב הוּנָא: רַב ...


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The questioner is correct, there is no explicit commandment in the Bible/Torah to believe in a Messiah. And if someone bases religious requirements as: statements or commandments within the Torah/Bible; then there is no "need" to believe in a Messiah. The Torah has no outright mentions of a Messiah, and while others mention a "hint" of ...


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The Torah does include a reference to the Messiah, when Balaam [the Gentile prophet] says: [I] heard the words of God, and know the knowledge of the most High, [and] saw the vision of the Almighty... A star shall shoot forth out of Jacob, and a scepter shall rise out of Israel… A ruler shall come out of Jacob... [Numbers 24:12-19] This passage is ...


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The Ibn Ezra sees the two groups to be different: כימי צאתך - והטעם: כימי צאת אבותיך מארץ מצרים "like the days of your fathers' leaving Egypt" vs "הטעם עמי, כאשר הזכיר עמך." Speaking of the nation as a singular (as it is introduced in the previous verse, "רְעֵ֧ה עַמְּךָ֣"). The Malbim actually sees the second half as a statement ...


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The text of Micha is referencing all the plagues which took place over an extended period of time, and which were part of the leaving. The Midrash says, "כמו שהביא במצרים עשר מכות שנאמר כימי צאתך מארץ מצרים אראנו נפלאות (מיכה ז טו)"


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It is referring to the miracles that occurred over the entire process of leaving Egypt, from the plagues to the splitting of the sea. These took place over many days.


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The Yaabetz there points out that there were others who entered Gan Eden while alive but later were sent out, Adam and his sons and an Ammora רב"א. We could say similarly that Moshiach is now in Gan Eden and will soon be sent out to reign in this world.


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The verses describe the Mashiach coming before God for an audience. What happens after that audience is not written in the text, nor why he came for an audience in the first place. The sages explain that post-the-audience, the Mashiach will come to redeem the Nation of Israel. Rabbi Yesha'ayahu of Trani in his commentary on Daniel, fills in the other gap and ...


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Rabbi Moses of Coucy, in his magnum opus, the SeMaG (Sefer Mitzvot Gadol) (end of introduction to the positive commandments) posits, that until Elijah the prophet appears, there will not be ANY other prophet. ואחר פטירת משה רבינו עמדו נביאים לישראל . . , ועל ידי כך אמרו הגוים כי הנביאים נתנבאו בתורה חדשה שלהם, לכך שלח להם הקב"ה ביד מלאכי, שהוא אחרון ...


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In Guide for the Perplexed 2:36 Rambam writes: The same circumstance, prevalence of sadness and dulness, was undoubtedly the direct cause of the interruption of prophecy during the exile: for can there be any greater misfortune for man than this: to be a slave bought for money in the service of ignorant and voluptuous masters, and powerless against them as ...


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Rabbi Avi Kahana from Machon Hamikdash says in note 52 that what the Rambam writes in Para Aduma 3:4 that Moshiach will make the tenth Para Aduma has no source in Chazal, and is not in the Mishna Para 3:5. ומה שכתב הרמב"ם שפרה אדומה יעשה משיח, אין לכך מקור בדברי חז"ל, וגם לא במשנה פרה ג, ה. הרמב"ם לא כתב כן כהלכה פסוקה, אלא מתוך אמונה, כי ...


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The passage in Sanhedrin 98b,can't be taken as one of the claimed proofs that in the Jewish tradition ,exits an individual messianic interpretation,of Isaiah 53. from Wikipedia "Isaiah 53": "Sanhedrin 98b in the Babylonian Talmud speculates rather ironically about the undisclosed name of the unrevealed Jewish Messiah to come, so as to say it ...


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Malachi 3:6 כִּי אֲנִי יְהֹוָה לֹא שָׁנִיתִי וְאַתֶּם בְּנֵי־יַעֲקֹב לֹא כְלִיתֶם For I am the Lord, I do not change; therefore you sons of Jacob are not consumed. (Soncino translation) In particular see Malbim’s commentary there, where this verse is specifically a reference to not reneging on the covenant and therefore not destroying Israel: כי אני ה׳ לא ...


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One of the answers above mentioned Rabbi David Berger; here is his well-known article: https://www.tabletmag.com/sections/news/articles/berger-rebbe-messiah. In it he presents a lot of the evidence discussed above, and also clarifies some of the evidence that was left out by people on various sides. He is a very un-sympathetic narrator - as he makes clear.


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Before World War Two, Rav Elchonon Wasserman wrote an entire sefer titled Ikvesa D'Meshicha which you may find particularly helpful in developing a clearer picture of the definition of the 'footsteps of Mashiach'. Some of the primary points he makes include the rapid acceleration of global changes due to the relatively short time left in the master plan ...


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