15

The man isn't Jewish in this case, so he has no obligation whatsoever in marrying a Jewish woman. It is forbidden for the Jewish woman to marry this man because he is not a Jew. If the man truly feels a connection with Judaism he should convert.


13

If you know for a fact that she was Jewish, then you are 100% Jewish. No conversion is needed. Mazal Tov, and Enjoy! :)


13

According to the Kahati comment on that Mishnah, it should be read A ger brings but does not read ... If [he is not a ger but only] his mother is Jewish he brings and says ... Kahati explains that this is put in because we might think that a person whose father is not a Jew but whose mother is a Jew would not be able to say the pasuk because the term ...


6

This is a very complicated issue. I'll start with the point of if Mr. X himself says he is Jewish. The Talmud in Pesachim 3b has the story of a non-Jew who was given to eat from the Korban Pesach when he said he was Jewish. Tosefos there writes (s.v. ואנא): מכאן אין ראיה שנאמין לכל הבא לפנינו ואומר ישראל אני דשאני הכא דרוב ישראל היו ואזלינן בתר רובא אך ...


6

A giyur lechumra is usually intended for someone who's already fully observing Judaism. The execution is the same -- circumcision or drawing blood for men; declaration of mitzva acceptance and immersion in a mikva witnessed by three rabbis. If someone's already keeping everything but for instance oops, found out they were adopted, then the rabbis assume the ...


6

I have met people that this occurred to and the problem is often the proof of the family status. That is, unless there is absolute proof (on a halachik - legal - basis), many people in this circumstance will "convert out of doubt". If the original Jewish mother was too long ago (as in centuries), it is possible that one of the intervening generations may not ...


5

The system of matrilineal descent began with the giving of the Torah at Sinai. Prior to that, Jewishness was a matter of tribal identity, therefore patrilineal. (And people could be kicked out of the tribe, as Esav was.) We believe that post-Sinai, any women who came from outside of the Jewish people went through a conversion. You say We have no proof that ...


5

Samaritans, much like Jews, are an isolated and endogamous community who remained in a single region for much of their existence. So while empires came and went and conquered the region, intermixed with the locals to a certain extent, expelled, and resettled different people and themselves, the Samaritans remained in their "habitat" and continued practicing ...


3

I think it's possible that the final part is about someone who was born Jewish. That reading is supported by the way the Mishna elsewhere speaks about the child of a Jewish mother being Jewish, and I don't think that disputes about this are recorded. The quote you gave is about converts... but the second half is also about which groups of people say what in ...


3

Indeed, one is considered Jewish if one's mother is Jewish or if one converts in accordance with Halakhah (Jewish law). See this answer and the "introductory article" cited below for more information. If your maternal grandmother's maternal grandmother was Jewish, that means: Your maternal's grandmother mother was Jewish Your maternal grandmother is Jewish ...


3

Regardless of how he considers himself, he is not Jewish. Subsequently, it is not just not encouraged, but forbidden for him to marry a Jewess.


2

This is likely not the answer you're looking for, but this is the best I could figure out. The first common maternal ancestor for the Shevatim was either Shem's wife, or more likely Na'amah b' Lamech. According to meforshim on Bereishit 4:22 she became Noach's wife and was the mother of Shem, Cham, and Japhet.


2

in regard to aliya, touching wine, and counting for minyan one can rely on chazka that if someone was assumed a Jew he is. when it comes to marriage so long as there is no reason to suspect one can rely on chazka and does not need to research there yichus. Should there be a reason to suspect otherwise, you must trace back until there is no more reason for ...


2

This is a great question by the opening commenter, the answer is that Ezra is right IN A WAY, but the Samaritans are 100% related to the " ORIGINAL Male Jews". Looking at the ancient Samaritans gives us a great look at how the ancient Hebrews physically looked. Here are some remarkable facts about the Samaritans They hardly ever intermarried according ...


2

From the intro to chapter 5 in זרע ישראל by Rav Amsalem, he describes Zera Yisrael as: ויש להם לרוב צד יהדות ברור, שאביהם או סבם או סבתם וכדומה היו יהודים שנשאו נכריות So he does include a Jewish grandparent in his definition. In almost every example after that, the book seems to uses the case of a Jewish father, but it seems that Rav Amsalem views it ...


1

Given the long non-observant ancestry, I think serious questions could be raised as to the authenticity of that person's Jewish lineage. In short, I think a Rav would need to be consulted.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible