9

The gemara on Yoma 26a explains that there was just one lottery that covered both services: א"ר יוחנן אין מפייסין על תמיד של בין הערבים אלא כהן שזכה בו בשחרית זוכה בו ערבית Rabbi Yoḥanan said: They did not hold a separate lottery for the slaughtering and sacrifice of the daily afternoon offering. Rather, the same priest who won a particular ...


9

In Guide for the Perplexed 3:46 Rambam writes: The goat [of the Day of Atonement] that was sent [into the wilderness] (Lev. xvi. 20, seq.) served as an atonement for all serious transgressions more than any other sin-offering of the congregation. As it thus seemed to carry off all sins, it was not accepted as an ordinary sacrifice to be slaughtered, burnt,...


6

The Yerusalmi Yuma [6/3] writes that from the word איש עתי [in the singular form] we understand that the goat cannot be sent with two people.


6

The Sefer HaChinuch explains (§95) that the two goats of Yom Kippur are symbolic for the choice presented to a sinner – the goat for Hashem representing one who repents, and the goat for Azazel representing one who doesn’t. ובקרבן עזאזל שנשלח חי אל מקום החרבן והכליון נאמר בפשט הענין לבל ידמה החוטא הגמור שאחר שתקבל נפשו ענש על חטאים, התשוב לעמוד במקום ...


6

Bartenura in Yoma explains (based on the gemara to this mishnah) that ‘light’ commandments here means all positive mitzvot as well as negative mitzvot which are able to be subsequently ‘fixed’ (lav hanitak le’asei). ‘Severe’ transgressions includes the bulk of negative mitzvot (and within that set the gemara differentiates further depending on certain ...


5

When I'm sick during the winter (happens a lot unfortunately), I daven vasikin at home. I use the myzmanim + cell phone clock method, but also have a window nearby with the shades open. I've noticed that there's a substantial variation in the amount of light at sunrise, depending on the weather. If it's cloudy, it can be pretty dark outside, even when the ...


5

Nice question. To me it seems that to begin with, the whole concept of having a system wherein people compete to "win" a mitzva opportunity is a tricky matter. If indeed everyone's intention is pure about it, i.e. all participants genuinely want to fulfill Hashem's mitzvah for it's sake, and competing is but a means to express that desire, then fine. But ...


5

The Ritva asks this very question on Yuma daf 2a and answers it. לפיכך בשעת שריפתה היו נוגעין בו כדי לטמאו: ואף על גב דטומאה זו אינה אלא מדרבנן הא אית בה הכירא לצדוקין שיודעין היו דלדידן טהרת הקדש טומאה היא לפרה וכיון שרואין שאנו מצריכין אותו טבילה בלא הערב שמש הא איכא הכירא Even though this tumah was only Rabbinical, since the tzidukim knew that ...


4

Rashi (ibid) clearly distinguishes between the whitening of sin and the commandment of the goat. This strongly implies that while the two may be correlated, they are ultimately independent and one does not necessarily cause the other. In other words, The whitening of sin was not necessarily always the direct result of the goat's death. Likewise, the ...


4

Adapting from here: Panim Yafos (by the Baal Hahaflaah) and Pnei Dovid (by the Chida): to teach us that (according to Tosafos) even with arayos, where there's no maaseh, יהרג ואל יעבור doesn't apply. Meshech Chochmah: to teach us that (according to the Shach's understanding of the Rambam) יהרג ואל יעבור doesn't apply to אביזרייהו דעריות, which is the ...


4

In the course of a wide-ranging teshuvah about pikuach nefesh on Shabbos, the Tzitz Eliezer quotes several explanations: (from Kapei Aharon) According to one view (R' Shimon ben Menasya), it might be permissible to violate Shabbos for pikuach nefesh only if the person will thereby be able to keep future Shabbosos, but not for חיי שעה, if they're anyway ...


4

Perhaps an answer: There is punishment for the sin, which is for the rebellion against G-d. This is immediately shielded by repentance. Then, there is the process of complete atonement, which is more of a refinement or educational processes. This may require suffering to complete. Yet, this suffering is not a punishment. For example, when the Jewish ...


3

Ramban writes about this in his commentary to Vayikra 16:8. Rather than translate the whole piece, I will link to this summary and analysis by R. Ezra Bick. Some key quotes: The Ramban begins by explaining that azazel refers to some sort of evil power (as opposed to the explanation of Rashi that it means a "hard and rocky place"). He first cites the Ibn ...


3

It would seem that the key is the Gemara (Yoma 70a) on this Mishnah. Most of these quotes can be found on Sefaria, and for the one that can’t, I’ve provided a link to HebrewBooks. הרואה כהן גדול כו' לא מפני שאינו רשאי פשיטא מהו דתימא כדריש לקיש דאמר ריש לקיש אין מעבירין על המצות ומאי מצוה (משלי יד, כח) ברב עם הדרת מלך קמ"ל “One who sees the High ...


3

The simple sense would be as the Rambam describes it (Hilchos Teshuva 7:3) ואלו העוונות, קשים מאותן שיש בהן מעשה, שבזמן שאדם נשקע באלו, קשה הוא לפרוש These sins [anger, hatred, jealousy, etc. as enumerated there and "similar to them"] are more difficult than sins of action, because when a person is buried in them, it is hard[er] to separate. In ...


3

Art Scroll Talmud Yomah 54b1 note 9 explains that the even shesiyay is symbolic of the purpose of the world and the ideal on which it is founded (Meiri). Notes 10, 12, and 25 cite Rashi, that it was created first and the clods of earth were added to it to expand the creation until the entire world (and universe of matter) came into being. That is, this ...


3

The Gemoro (Yoma 22a) answers your question: והא מעיקרא מאי טעמא לא תקינו לה רבנן פייסא? מעיקרא סבור כיון דעבודת לילה היא לא חשיבא להו ולא אתו. כיון דחזו דקאתו ואתו לידי סכנה תקינו לה פייסא. ‏ Asks the Gemoro: So why didn't they do Pias originally (for who would do Trumas Hadeshen)? Answers the Gemoro: Originally they assumed that since it was a ...


3

Look further the gemara: בראשונה היו קושרין לשון של זהורית על פתח אולם מבפנים וכיון שהגיע שעיר למדבר היה מלבין וידעו שנעשית מצותו Originally they used to tie the thread of crimson wool to the entrance of the Ulam within, and as soon as the he-goat reached the wilderness, it turned white. Then they knew that the commandment concerning it had ...


3

The actual language there in Yoma 75 is, "The righteous, it fell by the door of their houses." That would be a good sign it was for them. Either way, I don't know if there was a concept of "his" or "someone else's" until one picked it up. It was there for the taking; you'd walk until you found some to gather; you'd gather until your measure was filled. The ...


2

Rashash and Sfas Emes answer the qustion of the Bach and explain that when Rashi says that (as he explained earlier) there was an commandment to put two blocks of wood on the altar in the morning and the afternoon, he meant that in the time of Shimon Hatzadick, there was no need to put any other wood on the altar. This is one of the miracles that continued ...


2

The idea is discussed in hatorah.net There under קיב ע"א, he notes that Talmidei Chachomim only took their shoes off on Friday night. He records Yoma 78b and says (my translation of an extract) it can be explained through Rav Nachman bar Yitzchok's maamar in Gittin 57b on the possuk (כי עליך הורגנו כל היום" (תהלים מד"  which he says refers ...


2

This is definitely not a strange read of the pshat of the Megillah... In terms of the reading of Rava in this way, Shlal David (Esther 4:5) understands it to be so (Hebrew follows, emphasis mine): ויש לדקדק, מה ראה רבא על ככה דכנסת ישראל היו מתרעמים על דוד ועל מרדכי, ולא דרש לזכות כמו אידך אמוראי. ונראה דרבא לשיטתו אזיל, דהתוספות בשבת דף ע"ב [ע"ב ד"ה ...


2

The source for the pictures that are giving us trouble here is the Rambam at the end of meseches Midos in Peirush HaMishmayos. He draws (the original manuscript is extant) the Lishkas Hagazis entirely in the Ezras Yisroel, along the east wall in the north, (unlike the drawings presented in the question and original answer,) and he specifies the width of the ...


2

R. Yeshaya di Trani explains in Tosafot Rid (there) that קשו doesn't mean worse. Rather it means that thinking about sin causes more lust for the sin than committing the sin itself. As noted by R. Nahum Ash in his notes to Hilkhot Ishut (15:3), Rashi (there) too doesn't understand that it means that thoughts of sin are worse. Rather he seems to say that the ...


2

This article (Hebrew) discusses what seems to be a difference of opinion between the various piyyutim, namely whether the various lotteries discussed in Yoma Chapter 2 in fact took place on Yom Kippur, or only during the rest of the year.


1

Perhaps mentioning Moshe Rabainu arouses his merit or kvyachol reminds HKBH of his tefilos after the chet haeigel?


1

According to the the explanation of the Sulam on the Zohar the smoke rising in a straight pillar allowed the Kohen to apprehend some sort of mystical vision. בקטרת ההיא, כשהיה עולה העשן כעמוד, היה רואה הכהן אותיות של סוד השם הקדוש פורחות באויר ועולות למעלה כעמוד, לאחר כך, כמה מרכבות קדושות מסבבות אותה מכל הצדדים, עד שעולה באורה ושמחה ומשמח למי שמשמח, ...


1

In the case of Yom Kippur, since the prooftexts are from divrei kabbalah as opposed to divrei Torah, many consider the four which are in addition to eating to to be asmachta rather than a true derasha. (See here.) They are then either derabbanan, or else the Torah left it up to the Sages to define what the inuyim were. As @DoubleAA writes, the quote from ...


1

This is the true answer (that brings us back to my puzzling): This is the Tifferes Isroel's plan drawn to scale (on the bottom) found at the end of Mishnah in Midos: (If you look at the wall, the bricks are 5x10 Amas to scale). From this plan we can learn that (according to him) the Lishka was about 25 Amas (12 meters) long, while the left part of it was ...


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