9

Actually, a list isn't hard to compile at all- it was already done by the mishna! Meseches Ediyus, chapter 4, gives a list of 'leniencies of Beis Shammai'.


9

There are two different types of gzeirah shava specific words were part of the mesorah but the pesukim used and / or the actual item that was derived from the gzeirah shava may not have been part of the mesorah. The content of the limud was part of the mesorah but not the words used in the gzeirah shava. Halichos Olam Shaar 4. See also Ramban sefer ...


8

For the first one: there's an Aramaic term עללתא, meaning "crop" or "harvest" (see Talmud, Nedarim 55a, and Targum Onkelos to Vayikra 25:3). Could be that the Akkadian cognate, if there is one, had an aleph instead of an ayin. (In fact, according to Wikipedia, Akkadian lacked an ayin sound.) For the second: the Aramaic word for "spy&...


7

Rosh Hashanah 16a: Rav Yosef said: Like whom do we hold that we pray nowadays for the sick and ailing? Like whom? Like Rabbi Yosi! [who says that "a person is judged every day"] And if you'd rather, I'll answer per Rabbi Yitzchak, who said that "crying out is good for a person, whether before or after the verdict." Trans. mine, except ...


6

It does occur sometimes in Midrashei Halacha. See for example Bava Kamma 10b: תשלומי נזק מלמד שהבעלים מטפלין בנבילה מנא הני מילי אמר ר' אמי דאמר קרא (ויקרא כד, יח) מכה נפש בהמה ישלמנה אל תקרי ישלמנה אלא ישלימנה ‘“To compensate for damage" imports that the owners [plaintiffs] have to retain the carcass as part payment’. What is the authority for this ...


5

Yes! we definitely find this name in other Rabbinic literature. See Sanhedrin 94a. Yerushalmi Sheviis chapter 6. Yitzchak Meitlis in the appendix to his book Excavating the Bible writes that this refers to Africa as the same story is found in the works of Procopius (Byzantine historian) where it is related that the Canaanites were afraid of Joshua Bin Nun (...


5

I once asked a rebbi of mine this very question, in a different context. The Gemara in Kiddushin 14b discusses a Gezerah Shavah using the word שכיר, a word that is found a number of times in the sections of the Torah that deal with slaves/servants. Tosofos there, s. v. מוכר, takes the liberty of applying this Gezerah Shavah to other instances of the word in ...


5

It seems that these hagahot were written mostly by a number of Tosafists, though I don't know who added them to the Shas/connected them to the Tosfot in R"H1. From what I can tell, they don't appear in this 15th-16th century manuscript of the Tosfot of R"H (and other masechtot), though I may be wrong, as it's hard to read2. The one at 11b appears ...


5

The Rambam in Hilchos Kiddush Hachodesh Perek 2, leaves out the option of Meizid, however Tosfos on 22B clearly says that he had the words included in the Gemarah. The Yaavitz in his commentary to Rosh Hashana cites his commentary on Avos 3:13, where he qualifies that there's no disagreement between them. Tosfos' meizid means with a reason but it's called ...


4

Gemara Rosh Hashana 17b עיני ה' אלהיך בה עתים לטובה עתים לרעה עתים לטובה כיצד הרי שהיו ישראל רשעים גמורין בראש השנה ופסקו להם גשמים מועטים לסוף חזרו בהן להוסיף עליהן אי אפשר שכבר נגזרה גזרה אלא הקב"ה מורידן בזמנן על הארץ הצריכה להן הכל לפי הארץ עתים לרעה כיצד הרי שהיו ישראל צדיקים גמורין בר"ה ופסקו עליהן גשמים מרובין לסוף חזרו בהן לפחות מהן אי ...


4

See this article by Rabbi Frand, where he discusses the related question of why it is that we do not always see the recital of the 13 middot actually being effective in practice. He quotes two basic approaches: The Reishis Chochmah explains that the gemara referred to in the question is not actually talking about reciting the 13 Middos, but emulating them. ...


4

You ask a fantastic question! The book Sichas Malachei Hashores was written by Rav Tzadok HaKohen of Lublin, where he expounds sources in the Bavli, Midrash, Zohar, and Yerushalmi pertaining to the practice of angels and their relationship to man. In the section on Yerushalmi he tackles this Yerushalmi. In creation we see that when everything was called ...


3

Since the question can be answered with mostly opinion based statements, I hope you would forgive me if I could not cite halakhah for all my claims. I dare to give an answer due to my (limited) experience as a chazan. First, the purpose of different piyutim should be considered. Our sages of blessed memory composed these religious poems in order to increase ...


3

Try beforehand reading through all the davening in English (or any language you understand), so you get an idea what is really being said. This will show you that what is being said itself can be used as a springboard for thought and reflection, and that you may even be anticipating certain passages. Also, that it is not chock full of words, rather all the ...


3

A potential answer is as follows: R. Yehoshua is not adducing a formal proof when he quotes the verse לבשו כרים הצאן. It is simply an additional support. He is saying that I said that creation was in Nissan and you said that creation was in Tishrei, and it makes more sense for it to have been in Nissan because Nissan is around the mating time and Tishrei is ...


3

In Kuntres Umayon, it speaks about that on Rosh Hashana, it can be decreed, for example, that they'll be a lot of rain, and if later you're not deserving, you'll get the rain in the wrong place, or vice versa.


3

Rambam hilchot "kiddush hachodeh" chapter 5, halachot 8-11 states that: a) The distance the messengers reached were different every year (depending on political borders, weather, and number of shabbas/holidays in which they couldn't travel). Note that the maximum distance is 10 days journey (excluding shabbas/holidays). Basically, there were places that ...


3

There were, indeed, four woman (the fourth being Rivka). Only the first three were "remembered" on Rosh Hashona. Hence, the Artsroll is correct when referring to the historical fact that four women were baren. However the piyut intended to invoke the merit of which they were remembered on Rosh Hashona, and hence only mentioned those that were remembered. (...


3

According to the Benei Yehoyada, "יעשו לפני כסדר הזה -- let them act before Me in accordance with this order" is not about prayer. (Contrary to the included explanation by Rav Edin Steinzaltz shlit"a.) Rather, Hashem Himself listed 13 aspects of His Compassion and told us that if we ever sin, emulating them -- actually being compassionate ...


2

I think we may have a different reading of this. See be'er hetev #2 on the page you linked -- "one need not add any of the daytime to the fast"; the fast starts exactly at sunset. When Tisha B'Av is a Saturday night, we stop eating at sunset because maybe the fast has already begun; but don't do work until the stars come out, as then we're certain Shabbos ...


2

The omer count is 49 days (seven complete weeks) after the bringing of the omer. Thus, Shavuos is one day of the week later than the "shabbos" which begins the omer period. That is day 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, 43, 50 (Shavuos) of the omer are all on the same day of the week. Since the baisusim force the first day of the omer to be on the day that follows the ...


2

Rosh HaShannah is called the birthday of the world. (HaYom haras olam...see machzor mussaf) However, the pinnacle of creation is Adam, the first man. Therefore, Rosh HaShannah is the birthday of Adam. (the world's birthday is represented by Adam's birthday.) The first three words of the pasuk (HaYotzer yachad libam...)can be translated: "The One who forms ...


2

The Alshikh (B'midbar 14:20) says that he heard in the name of the Sefer Livnat HaSapir that the intent of the Gemara is not that one recite the attributes, but rather to perform them ourselves. The same author, R. Avraham Saba writes this in his Tsror HaMor (Parashat Ki Tisa s.v. Vayered Hashem): אנו רואים הרבה פעמים בעונותינו שאנו מעוטפים בטלית ואין ...


2

It seems clear that the Sefer HaIkkarim (4:36) understood it literally. He writes that since God lasts infinitely, it is appropriate that one who sins against him be punished infinitely as well. And he notes that the passage in Rosh Hashana is consistent with this: אחר שהיתה כונתו לזלזל בכבודו של מלך ראוי שיהיה נענש כפי כונתו לא כפי הפעל המגיע ממנו בלבד, ...


2

As we learn in the first Bartenura of the first Mishna in Rosh Hashana, the Rosh Hashana for kings is on Rosh Hashana! The exception being for Jewish kings, and the reason is that we learn from a verse (in Melachim-1:6) that we count their reign using the Exodus-calendar, which starts in Nissan. אַרְבָּעָה רָאשֵׁי שָׁנִים הֵן. לַמְּלָכִים. מַלְכֵי ...


2

According to Mishneh Torah Erechin V'Charamin 6:1, הקדש goes to the Temple treasury by default, but חרם goes to the Kohanim by default unless the person consecrating it specifies that it is to go to the temple treasury. This is based on Numbers 18:14 which gives "All cherem in Israel" to the Kohanim.


2

This question is based on a misunderstanding of the gemara. The assertion here isn't that there is a 6-hour time difference between Eretz Yisrael and Bavel. Rather, the case refers back to the previous discussion in the gemara about determining whether the molad occurred before or after midday. First, some background. As we've already learned on this daf, ...


2

I think there are a few factors that significantly mitigate the magnitude of the problem: As indicated in comments by DoubleAA, most of Israel's major fruit crops' harvest seasons are not in Shevat-time. See, for example, this contemporary calendar, which lists months between June and October for figs, pomegranates, olives, and dates. (It says "year-round" ...


1

Rabbeinu Chananel provided the following interpretation/explanation: צוה למלאך להתעטף כש”ץ היורד לפני התיבה והראהו למשה ואמר ליה כל זה שישראל חוטאים לפני. עשה לפני כסדר הזה ואני מוחל להם. Translation: He commanded to an angel to cover himself like a prayer leader who descends before the prayer stand and showed Moses and said to him: all this is for if ...


1

Sefer HaChinuch 307 refers to what he wrote in 302 (regarding the Omer): It is from the roots of the commandment [that it is] in order that we contemplate, through [this] deed, the great kindness that God, blessed be He, does for His creatures, to renew the grain each year for [our] nourishment. Therefore it is fitting for us that we should sacrifice to ...


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