10

TLDR: The Talmud's preferred plant for Maror is lettuce-like and leafy. In cold climates people started using horseradish root because it was still too cold to grow leafy plants at Pesach time, and if you put together the right combination of opinions you can construct an argument that horseradish root fulfills the Mitzva. The argument isn't particularly ...


7

This question can be addressed by noting that there is a dispute among the rishonim whether Korech should get dipped at all. See Tur O.C. 475 with commentaries, and Shulchan Aruch there with commentaries. The opinion that states that Korech is not dipped says that there are only supposed to be two dippings. R. David Halevi Segal explains (Turei Zahav O.C. ...


7

The Talmud (Shabbat 91a) discusses the minimum measurement of food that must be carried between domains on Shabbat in order to be obligated in punishment. The minimum shiur depends on what the intended use of the object is. A kegrogeret (the size of a dried fig, which is greater than or equal to a kezayit) is the minimum amount of food when the food is ...


6

The problem is not making a hefsek between המוציא and eating korech, because there isn't a problem to speak after the beracha rishona once you have already eaten. The Shulchan Aruch says not to make a hefsek between על אכילת מצה and על אכילת מרור and eating korech because they are blessings on the commandment of eating matsa and maror, and according to Hilel'...


6

The Chabad custom (Sefer Haminhagim Chabad, Haggada im Likkutey Tammim Uminhagim, see also Aruch Hashulchan 473:14) is to use a combination of ground horseradish and Romaine lettuce. We put the ground horseradish inside the lettuce and dip that into the charoses. Shulchan Aruch (473:5) rules that one may combine the different types of Maror, and this custom ...


5

There is a כלל in the Talmud, כל הראוי לבילה, בילה מעכבת בו, כל שאין ראוי לבילה, בילה מעכבת בו. I.e. if there is an action required to be done (as part of a chain of actions), as long as one is able to do so, one does not need to actually do it. But if it cannot be done, the entire chain of actions is invalidated. The Gemara above speaks of a קרבן מנחה, ...


5

The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains in his Haggada (Likkutey Taamim Uminhagim): The verse regarding the original Korban Pesach (Shemos 12:8) - "ואכלו את הבשר גו' ומצות על מרורים יאכלוהו" (They shall eat the flesh, roasted over the fire, and unleavened cakes; with bitter herbs they shall eat it) would seem to come as a counter-proof to Hillel's opinion that one ...


4

In old manuscripts of the Mishna (and in the Rambam's Haggada), the questions are actually phrased "על שם מה" not "על שום מה". Thus the "reasons" we are giving are based on the names. (See, for instance, the commentary in this Haggada.) "Sabba, why do we eat this thing called Pesach?" "Well, it's because God skipped (Pasach) over our houses when he killed ...


4

We do not count the korech part as a dipping in the sense that we mean for karpas and Maror. It is a זכר למקדש כהלל and a way of accomodating both views as to how the matza and maror must be eaten. Since only one of the methods is correct, we are still only dipping two times. Alternatively, on a child's level, I would expect him to notice the dipping as ...


4

Horseradish has the weight of Ashkenazic tradition behind it, but botanists would tell you the Gemara seemed to have intended members of the lettuce/endive/chicory/dandelion family. Rabbi Hershel Welcher, head of the Vaad of Queens, told me he uses "lettuce, plus a little horseradish for tradition's sake. (That's "sake"-rhymes-with-bake, not rice-wine.) ...


3

The Magen Avraham was bothered by this (OC 475:2) and suggests that there is no need to say Shehakol since you can rely on the opinions that Hamotzi covers it. He further suggests that even Shehakol is unnecessary since it's like a spice that no one ever eats alone (cf. OC 202:16). (According to this one could eat plenty of food at Karpas and say Borei ...


3

I am not sure I would agree with the premise of the question, that the reason to mention these (two of) three things because (for Pesach) the Torah says the Lord will see the blood and not smite and because (for Matza) that it is evidence. Rather, the most immediate cause of Rabban Gamliel's opinion is the word Zeh, within the command to relate the story of ...


3

Let us ask another question to help address this one: The question about the dipping is asked long before the Maror and Korech are dipped. So how is a child supposed to know to ask about why we have two dippings, if thus far there has only been one? This question is resolved by what Tosafos writes (Pesachim 114a) about the removal of the table. הביאו ...


3

Rambam Hilchos Chanuka 3:5: ולמה מברכין על יום טוב שני, והם לא תיקנוהו אלא מפני הספק--כדי שלא יזלזלו בו. Why do we make a blessing on the second day of Yom Tov, as it was only established as a safek? In order that people do not come to disrespect the day If Yom Tov sheni was dealt with differently, in ways that treat it on a lower level due to it's ...


3

No, it can not be used because if it's in vinegar for longer than 24 hours it's considered cooked. And even less than that is not good since the surface is "cooked". Buy Mason Jars - they are airtight and excellent for this. Walmart/Target/etc sell them by the case and they are pretty cheap - about $1 per jar.


2

Keep in air-tight container and keep in refridgerator.


2

We use unground horseradish. If you can't handle the gases in it, let it sit out for a few hours. Or wrap it in foil right after cutting for the full effect. We also use romain lettuce bases (not the leaf, the base of the plant) for those who don't want the horseradish (or as a supplement for those who can't eat a ke-zait of it).


1

I have seen in a number of hagados that one cannot fully appreciate the maror that he has gone through until after he has entered the salvation sent by Hashem and is looking back. Matza symbolizing the slavery, lechem oni and the freedom thus needs to come first before we can look back and try to understand what we have gone through. This is why Rabban ...


1

There is a simple explanation. Rava, who holds on 115b that you can swallow matzah whole (presumably because you don't need to taste it) argues with Ravina's ruling on 115a that the taste of the maror would nullify the taste of the matzah if they're eaten together. His very next words in Pesachim 115b after your quote are: בלע מצה ומרור ידי מצה יצא ידי ...


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