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Some commentators say that Zerubbabel was supposed to be king (such as Ibn Ezra, see e.g. his commentary to 4:14). Zerubbabel is never explicitly called a king, but he was from the royal family (1 Chronicles 3:19), and also served as governor (פֶּחָה) of Judea (Haggai 1:1). Zerubbabel was the one who built the Temple (he participates in the building in Ezra,...


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This is unsourced. The reason why horses and gold aren’t given a set amount is that different kings have needs for different amounts of each depending on the circumstances. For example, during a time of war, a king would need more gold to pay soldiers and more horses for them to ride on than in a time of peace. Therefore the Rambam said that a king can’t ...


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While not explicitly addressing your scenario, the Rambam Hilchos Melachim 2:6 writes about how a king should behave and generally conduct himself: כְּדֶרֶךְ שֶׁחָלַק לוֹ הַכָּתוּב הַכָּבוֹד הַגָּדוֹל. וְחִיֵּב הַכּל בִּכְבוֹדוֹ. כָּךְ צִוָּהוּ לִהְיוֹת לִבּוֹ בְּקִרְבּוֹ שָׁפָל וְחָלָל שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (תהילים קט כב) "וְלִבִּי חָלַל בְּקִרְבִּי". וְלֹא ...


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In this answer a man with amputated legs above the knee cannot do Chalitza and would normally have to do Yibbum whether sefaradi or ashkenazi. Seridei Eish III 49 quoting Or zarua 665. So if this amputee is also forbidden by a Negative commandment to marry this woman in these cases: a Petzua Daka - he has crushed genitals and cannot marry a Yisraelis (...


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The Gemara addresses this in 19b, and Rashi there explains the mishna; he says the issue here is that yibbum and chalitzah both clash with the obligation of a king's honor. Chalitza -- to have him summoned before the court and for someone to spit in front of him; yibbum (this is cool!) -- for him to say "I'm filling in for my dead brother" ... the king ...


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